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until such time as a rocky mountain region forum is created and this thread moved there...

 

i've been here about a year and a half. "here" being boulder. there's more good food in boulder/denver than people realize, even if very little of it is chinese. here's some of the highlights we've experienced so far:

 

1) great vietnamese food on s. federal in denver. very good dedicated pho places as well as at least two larger vietnamese cuisine restaurants: dalat and new saigon. i look forward to exploring this cuisine/street more thoroughly.

 

2) luca d'italia. a neo'ish italian place in denver. very popular, very good. i was not as enthused by family member mizuna across the corner but that was more a function of service.

 

3) a great thai restaurant in aurora (a suburb to the east) by the name of yummy yummy thai. silly name, horrible location (next to a fleabag motel) great food. better food than in most places in thaitown in los angeles. there is one chef who does all the cooking, and who grows her own ingredients etc. ask for it hot and it will blow your ears out. (this is where we ate with moby last month).

 

4) in boulder there's some very good mid-range places: for instance the full moon grill. some newer fancier places have opened in the last year (the kitchen and frasca--but living a life of genteel poverty as a humanities academic i have not yet made it to either place).

 

well, this is mostly a post designed to draw fml, and others who know the food scene much better, into posting.

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Mongo,

 

After spending the week in Breckenridge over New Year my husband and I decided that we totally love Colorado and would be happy to move there. C's office has a branch in Boulder and there was an article about Boulder recently in... was it Gourmet? Or am I completely wrong... was it Self? It was in one of the magazines I subscribe to.

 

So do you recommend it as a city?

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well it depends on what you are looking for. boulder and denver are two liberal outposts in a very conservative state. boulder is small--about 100,000 people, denver about 5-6 times as big. while there is some interesting stuff here you're not going to get the wide culinary or general arts scene here that you will in a major american metro. on the other hand this is an incredibly beautiful state--boulder is very nicely situated. it can get cold but not in the depressing midwestern or north-atlantic way. boulder in particular has crazy weather--it was freezing last week, is in the 60s today. snow doesn't stay on the ground very long. and hey, all the hippies you can shake a stick at (though why you'd want to shake sticks at them i don't know).

 

another possible issue is that the region is not very ethnically diverse. in my experience, i've been one of 1-3 non-white people in any of the pricier restaurants we've been to in the region, and one of my colleagues at the university has been pulled over more than once for "driving while black"--then again my frame of reference for these things is los angeles. on the other hand, between boulder, denver and aurora we can get everything we need for our indian and korean cooking needs--and aurora in particular has a growing asian population which may mean good things in the food scene in the next few years. there is a large hispanic population in the state, however, and it is my goal to better explore the mexican restaurant scene in denver (i.e in the mexican neighbourhoods).

 

of course, housing is much cheaper here than on the coasts. and if you're a sports fan all the major sports (and even mls) are represented.

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oh, and i forgot to add: amazing, AMAZING beer. despite being the home-region of the coors family, colorado has more microbreweries per capita than any other state (or so i'm told). boulder itself has a number of excellent microbreweries and brewpubs.

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The oddest thing I found about living in Boulder was that the university population (the students) was far more conservative than the citizens.

 

It was a great place to live, with one exception, for me. The humidity (or lack thereof) really bothered me. I itched all the time, all over. Of course, being pregant and growing a belly made it worse, but still. I found when I moved to Santa Cruz that the average 60% humidity was ideal for me.

 

The weather in Boulder is more than tolerable (if you don't mind winter cold), but don't let people fool you about the winds. Those chinooks that come down can hard. It's rare that they're strong, but boy, when they hit, well....nothing like a cartwheeling pregnant woman blowing down the street like a tumbleweed.

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I itched all the time, all over.

Maybe you're allergic to patchouli.

Honey, I moved to Santa Cruz, California. Patchouli is the state flower.

 

And look, Ma, no more scratching—except the eyes out of the patchouli-bedrenched dreadlock freaks that ask me at the farmers market: "Are you registered to vote?"

 

SINCE YOU WERE A FETUS, AND GET AWAY FROM ME WITH YOUR CLIPBOARD.

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4) in boulder there's some very good mid-range places: for instance the full moon grill. some newer fancier places have opened in the last year (the kitchen and frasca--but living a life of genteel poverty as a humanities academic i have not yet made it to either place).

I had a very good meal at Frasca in October...

 

If you don't want to spend the money for dinner there, go sit at the bar and have some small plates and a glass of wine - very pleasant. Good small plates and excellent wine list.

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until such time as a rocky mountain region forum is created and this thread moved there...

 

i've been here about a year and a half. "here" being boulder. there's more good food in boulder/denver than people realize, even if very little of it is chinese. here's some of the highlights we've experienced so far:

 

1) great vietnamese food on s. federal in denver. very good dedicated pho places as well as at least two larger vietnamese cuisine restaurants: dalat and new saigon. i look forward to exploring this cuisine/street more thoroughly.

 

2) luca d'italia. a neo'ish italian place in denver. very popular, very good. i was not as enthused by family member mizuna across the corner but that was more a function of service.

 

3) a great thai restaurant in aurora (a suburb to the east) by the name of yummy yummy thai. silly name, horrible location (next to a fleabag motel) great food. better food than in most places in thaitown in los angeles. there is one chef who does all the cooking, and who grows her own ingredients etc. ask for it hot and it will blow your ears out. (this is where we ate with moby last month).

 

4) in boulder there's some very good mid-range places: for instance the full moon grill. some newer fancier places have opened in the last year (the kitchen and frasca--but living a life of genteel poverty as a humanities academic i have not yet made it to either place).

 

well, this is mostly a post designed to draw fml, and others who know the food scene much better, into posting.

drawn like a moth to the flame...

 

And now that Colorado is in its rightful place in the southwest:

 

Moongate Asian Grill (of Denver and Boulder) has just opened in Lafayette. For all those unfamiliar with Colorado, Lafayette is part of metro Boulder. Mongo's right in saying that Boulder has 100,000 people; Boulder County is approaching 300,000.

 

More posts to follow, as I get to know this site.

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i do want to spend the money--saving up. how would you say it compares to places of similar ambition/price in nyc?

I'm not sure how to answer that question. We had a very good meal. It was not unreasonably expensive in my view. Not as expensive as what it would be in NYC, but that's to be expected, and has nothing to do with the quality/ambition of the place.

 

The menu is here:

 

http://www.frascafoodandwine.com/menu.html

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Mongo,

 

After spending the week in Breckenridge over New Year my husband and I decided that we totally love Colorado and would be happy to move there.  C's office has a branch in Boulder and there was an article about Boulder recently in... was it Gourmet?  Or am I completely wrong... was it Self?  It was in one of the magazines I subscribe to.

 

So do you recommend it as a city?

Akiko,

 

While I'm no Mongo, I might be able to offer additional insight into the personality of boulder. Where do you live now? What are some other places you've lived and traveled and enjoyed? What is important to you in life? What are you looking for in a city?

 

Many years ago, I moved from my hometown of New York City to Jackson, Wyoming. From there, in 1983 I migrated to Colorado , and in 1988 finally settled in Boulder. In the mid '90s, I moved to one of the burgeoning boulder burbs, Lafayette. (Lafayette is about 7 miles east of Boulder.)

 

So ask some questions, I get a kick out of talking about it. Boulder's an interesting place.

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