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i do want to spend the money--saving up. how would you say it compares to places of similar ambition/price in nyc?

I'm not sure how to answer that question. We had a very good meal. It was expensive, but I didn't think unreasonably so.

let me ask it another way: do you think that restaurant/meal would sit comfortably alongside restaurants like it in new york? or do you think it is very good...for boulder? none of this will impact my decision to eat there. but since you do eat out a lot at fancy'ish places in nyc i'm interested in how you'd evaluate it in a broader context.

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Mongo-

Two suggestions for sticking your toe in the water at Frasca. As Olivette suggests, eating at the bar. We have spent several evenings in the fine company of Steve and Nick, the bartenders at Frasca, sitting at the bar where, for two, we order one appetizer, one salad and one main course -- the kitchen beautifully splits each selection (no extra charge) and we sometimes order a dessert. The other option is to go on selected Monday nights when they are doing a $29 prix fixe three course meal with choice of two dishes at each stage of the meal and matching wine pairings if one is so inclined.

I, for one, find Frasca to be the best "fine dining" in Boulder, and on a par with some great restaurants in other major cities such as San Fran, where I have spent more time recently eating than in my home town of NYC -- but I am changing that with a long weekend in Feb. to my roots along with the omnivore gourmet 12 year old son.

One place we want to try and have not gone yet, Proto's pizza in N. Boulder. One place we have been told to avoid (along with the Bombay Bistro) is Aqua Pazza.

Another place we want to try is Khow Thai on Broadway. Anyone?

As to moving here, all I can say is that I skied all weekend in Vail and tomorrow, January 20, it will be 70 degrees in Boulder and in the twenties in Chicago and maybe a little higher in NYC . . 'nough said.

 

As Buckeroo Bonzai says "wherever you go, there you are"

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on the other hand, between boulder, denver and aurora we can get everything we need for our indian and korean cooking needs

 

Mongo, I'm interested in this. Do you find Indian and/or Korean grocery stores? I don't think of Colorado as a place where first generation immigrants or Asian descent go to live! One of the things I love about being in a huge metropolitan center is that I can find obscure (well, to the asian cultures they're everyday items) things and continue to make very ethnic things for dinner that I grew up with.

 

While I'm no Mongo, I might be able to offer additional insight into the personality of boulder. Where do you live now? What are some other places you've lived and traveled and enjoyed? What is important to you in life? What are you looking for in a city?

 

Many years ago, I moved from my hometown of New York City to Jackson, Wyoming. From there, in 1983 I migrated to Colorado , and in 1988 finally settled in Boulder. In the mid '90s, I moved to one of the burgeoning boulder burbs, Lafayette. (Lafayette is about 7 miles east of Boulder.)

 

FML, I am really sort of a contradiction of a person. I grew up in Chicago and then went to Tokyo to work for several years, moved to New York for some time, and am now living in London. While I love the cosmopolitan nature and the way I can learn about many cultures in big cities (Tokyo and NY are my favorites) I also love small communities. My family is originally from Hawaii and that community and tie to nature sensibility is also important to me. My family used to ski in breckenridge/frisco every year and this is the first time I'd been back in almost ten years and remembered how much that area feels like home to me.

 

I read a few articles about Boulder. It struck me as being outdoorsy, liberal, nature loving, and a few articles were about the organic food scene in the town (were they exaggerating? Is there a good farmer's market?). Plus the fact that I'd be a pretty happy chick if I could go snowboarding half of the year! It probably won't happen for many years, we're tied to London for the near future but its funny how much my husband and I have been talking about Boulder for the future when I haven't even been there yet.

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There was a substantial Vietnamese community in Denver at one point. Is there still? Any good restaurants to recommend?

 

I was very disappointed in the dining options around Carbondale/Basalt on my last trip. (My dad, bless him, refuses to go into Aspen.) The best restaurant experience I've had there (not counting breakfast at Bernard's or Smithy's :rolleyes:) was at Six89, and that was so-so. This may be due in part to my stepmom's restaurant choices - I love her, but she has execrable taste in food. My siblings and I made a pact that next time we'll stay in and cook.

 

I miss the mountains.

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I read a few articles about Boulder. It struck me as being outdoorsy, liberal, nature loving, and a few articles were about the organic food scene in the town (were they exaggerating? Is there a good farmer's market?). Plus the fact that I'd be a pretty happy chick if I could go snowboarding half of the year! It probably won't happen for many years, we're tied to London for the near future but its funny how much my husband and I have been talking about Boulder for the future when I haven't even been there yet.

Boulder Farmers Market. And yes, you pinpointed Boulder well with "liberal, outdoorsy, and nature-loving."

 

Another thing it has going for it is that you can never get lost. The Rocky Mountains are to the west, and the flat is to the east, and that's that. (Unlike Santa Cruz, say, which has the ocean on the east, west, and south, and is the most confusing place to navigate I've ever lived in.)

 

One more little thing: many summer afternoons feature the best thunderstorms I've ever seen, Tucson notwithstanding. We lived on the first rise of the foothills (Dellwood and Third, for those who know Boulder), and could watch the storms rise in the east. It was great.

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FML, I am really sort of a contradiction of a person.  I grew up in Chicago and then went to Tokyo to work for several years, moved to New York for some time, and am now living in London.  While I love the cosmopolitan nature and the way I can learn about many cultures in big cities (Tokyo and NY are my favorites) I also love small communities.  My family is originally from Hawaii and that community and tie to nature sensibility is also important to me.  My family used to ski in breckenridge/frisco every year and this is the first time I'd been back in almost ten years and remembered how much that area feels like home to me. 

 

I read a few articles about Boulder.  It struck me as being outdoorsy, liberal, nature loving, and a few articles were about the organic food scene in the town (were they exaggerating?  Is there a good farmer's market?).  Plus the fact that I'd be a pretty happy chick if I could go snowboarding half of the year!  It probably won't happen for many years, we're tied to London for the near future but its funny how much my husband and I have been talking about Boulder for the future when I haven't even been there yet.

Akiko,

 

It's no exaggeration to call Boulder outdoorsy, liberal, and nature loving. It's that and more; it's also whacky. Names I've heard for Boulder over the years include "15 square miles surrounded by reality," "The People's Republic of Boulder" and "Tofu Town." The population includes aged (can't really still call them aging,) hippies, entrepreneurs, students, athletes in training, climbers, high tech dreamers, assorted freaks and eccentrics.

 

There is indeed a strong organic/granola crowd here. Among businesses that got their start in Boulder County are Celestial Seasonings, White Wave Soy, and Horizon Organic Dairy. There is a large vegetarian contingent, and a sizeable Buddhist bunch; besides the University of Colorado, there is Naropa University, which offers a Contemplative Education; It is the home of the Allen Ginsberg Library and the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, founded at Naropa University in 1974.

Mission Statement

The six elements of Naropa's mission are rooted in the original vision of the University's founder and its contemplative heritage.

 

History

Born in Tibet in 1940, Naropa's founder, Chögyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, was a lineage holder of both the Kagyu and Nyingma Buddhist traditions. Naropa University is based on Nalanda University, which was characterized by its joining of intellect and intuition.

 

I wouldn't call Boulder a small community though; it's not like a small mountain town. It is a small city. The tie to nature is extreme. If you enjoy playing in the mountains, there are wonderful opportunities both right here and a bit farther afield. Boulder Open Space includes the mountains at the west end of town. Rocky Mountain National Park is 45 minutes away. If you bicycle, run, hike, or climb you'll be in your element.

 

Sorry, I have to go now; I'll post this to start.

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More...

 

The closest lift served boarding/skiing, at Eldora, is a 30 minute drive up Boulder Canyon. Not world class, it's a small, low key ski area. To get to the big ski areas, you have to drive anywhere between 70 and 250 miles (often with heavy traffic in terrible conditions on I-70). There's backcountry skiing in the Indian Peaks Wilderness, just above the tiny old town of Ward, also about a half hour drive.

 

If you are addicted to fashionable shoes, you might have a problem with Boulder. It's a comfortable shoes kind of place. A typical shoe collection includes running shoes, snowshoes, downhill ski boots, telemarking boots, snow boots, hiking boots, tennis shoes, clogs, crocs, flip flops, water shoes, and a moldering old pair of Birkenstocks

 

I also lived in Chicago, while I was at law school at Northwestern, more than 30 years ago. It was living in Chicago, and liking it, that made me realize that NYC was not the only place I could imagine living. I was ready to be a ski bum, and moved to Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Now that was change. NYC is the ultimate in urban culture; Jackson is the ultimate mountain playground. When I was finally ready to leave Jackson (being 500 miles to the nearest city eventually began to get to me), Colorado was where I could have both the urban and the wilderness.

 

The city experience in Colorado is not on the level of NY or Tokyo. The urban experience is not why people live here, but there's enough of it of decent quality that I've not missed the big city life of NY. It would be foolish to move to Boulder/Denver/Ski Towns for the restaurant and food scenes, but they're good enough. Chains are here as they are everywhere, but there are far more individually, locally owned restaurants.

 

Oh yes; the weather. It's about 70º now,on January 21. The weather here is exciting, and milder than you think. People do move to Colorado for the climate.

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There was a substantial Vietnamese community in Denver at one point.  Is there still? Any good restaurants to recommend?

 

I was very disappointed in the dining options around Carbondale/Basalt on my last trip.  (My dad, bless him, refuses to go into Aspen.)  The best restaurant experience I've had there (not counting breakfast at Bernard's or Smithy's :rolleyes:) was at Six89, and that was so-so.  This may be due in part to my stepmom's restaurant choices - I love her, but she has execrable taste in food.  My siblings and I made a pact that next time we'll stay in and cook. 

 

I miss the mountains.

Hi Cathy,

 

I think we've "talked" before. Nice to see you. I grew up in NYC, and moved to Colorado. You grew up in Colorado and moved to NYC. You get to eat the rye bread I miss, I get to play in the mountains you miss.

South Federal in Denver is one of the great food strips of the country. Mongo's post gives a good brief rundown. Dalat and New Saigon can both be exquisite.

 

The mountains are here waiting for you. It is 70º today. The sky is purple blue.

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Almost, fml. These days I have to order the rye bread from Zingerman's.

 

Purple sky and 70º. Sigh.

 

Of course, tomorrow it could be -10º and blizzardy. :rolleyes:

 

 

PS I love love love Jackson Hole. Only been there in the summer, though.

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Almost, fml.  These days I have to order the rye bread from Zingerman's. 

 

Purple sky and 70º.  Sigh. 

 

Of course, tomorrow it could be -10º and blizzardy.  :rolleyes: 

 

 

PS  I love love love Jackson Hole.  Only been there in the summer, though.

No more bakery/ next to the appetizing /next to the bagel bakery niches? Order rye bread from Zingerman's? What about black and whites?

 

Summer's just a tease. Jackson's even better in the winter. Now, the Jackson of my mind is from more than 20 years ago. But I went there for what was meant to be a winter of skiing, and it ended up changing my life.

 

I served gefilte trout at my seder in jackson.

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Zabar's rye is white bread in disguise. There is still decent sour Jewish rye at Orwasher's, I believe, but by the time I schlep across town and back I might as well order Zingerman's, which was superb.

 

I haven't been on skis since...1968. :rolleyes:

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