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Mr. RBI

Le Coq Rico

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Arrived at 7:00 pm Friday 3/11/16. Opened the day before. A beautiful space and very accommodating

staff.

We shared the first two courses. My wife had sautéed chicken livers, hummus & mâche, I had

The veloute of chicken, (poultry broth morsels, cream & mushrooms).

Both dishes were outstanding.

For the main course we ordered the Brune Landaise. This was a whole bird which we were told is the closest you can get to the chicken from Bresse in France. This chicken was aged 110 days. Our reaction?

Incredibly delicious. The bird came with a salad and we ordered a side of mashed potatoes which was

recommended by our server Julien. The mashed potatoes were very buttery and we enjoyed them as well.

 

When it came to dessert my wife ordered L'lle Flottante and I had the Vanilla Raspberry Vacherin

Both were fine.

 

The restaurant has a very good selection of wines by the glass as well as full bottles. As my wife doesn't

drink much ( only sweet wine) I availed myself of a very nice glass of Bordeaux for $16.00. We also shared one sweet wine, a 3 0z pour of Petit Guiraud 2011 (Sauterne) for $22.00.

An additional glass of Bordeaux and an extra double espresso were comped by the General Manager.

 

Total Cost of the meal excluding tax and tip was $223.19 and worth every cent!

The restaurant has several other whole chickens and Rohan duck may also be available.

We can't wait to return,

 

Very highly recommended!

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Aha! A sibling of Antoine Westermann's Paris chicken bistro. Special birds and a distinct cooking method in which the chicken is simmered for several hours before roasting. Thanks for the good report.

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For the record, Mr. RBI is my dh Michael. To expand a bit on what he wrote....

 

We shared our first courses. I love chicken livers. But with hummus? Well, it's an inspired combo. The liver was perfectly sautéed, and the hummus was some of the best I've ever had. I'm not the big fan of chicken soup that Michael is, but the light yet intensely flavorful velouté bowled me over.

 

The Brune Landaise was quite sizable. It arrived cut up, piping hot, and glistening. There was a small pitcher of chicken jus; however, this bird was so juicy that it hardly needed any enhancement. And about those mashed potatoes. Actually, the French "pommes purée" is a more accurate description since these potatoes were puréed to exquisite smoothness and must surely have included a massive amount of butter and cream. OMG delicious!

 

Overall, the cooking here is at an extremely high level.

 

Everyone on the staff was very cordial and welcoming. Service was flawless which was amazing considering that this was only their second day open to the public.

 

As Michael mentioned, it's an extremely attractive space. The noise level when the dining room is full (which it was by the time we left) is blessedly reasonable. In fact, the g.m. told us that they took pains to incorporate design elements to make it so. There is a bar area in the front (I don't know if they serve any food there), and in addition to the dining room (seats about 50), the open kitchen has a long counter where you can have the full menu.

 

We're thrilled to have Le Coq Rico a 10-minute walk from our apartment. It immediately goes on our regular dining rotation.

 

Website

 

I haven't put my pictures on Flickr yet. When I do, I'll post a link.

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Well then, a double welcome to Mr. RBI! You have already demonstrated exquisite taste. :D

 

Definitely a place I'm interested in trying.

 

I just have one question: I noticed those numbers (110 days; 90 days) on the menu and assumed that's the age of the chicken at slaughter. Surely not how long it is held (aged) between slaughter and cooking? Can anyone confirm or correct?

 

Actually, another question, since Roz hasn't yet posted photos: since Francis Staub is a partner, do they make liberal use of his adorable cocottes and other wares? I imagine that the presentation of dishes would be really nice if they do.

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Well then, a double welcome to Mr. RBI! You have already demonstrated exquisite taste. :D

 

Definitely a place I'm interested in trying.

 

I just have one question: I noticed those numbers (110 days; 90 days) on the menu and assumed that's the age of the chicken at slaughter. Surely not how long it is held (aged) between slaughter and cooking? Can anyone confirm or correct?

 

Actually, another question, since Roz hasn't yet posted photos: since Francis Staub is a partner, do they make liberal use of his adorable cocottes and other wares? I imagine that the presentation of dishes would be really nice if they do.

 

If you mean that he married me? Then I take that as a huge compliment! :)

 

We didn't ask what the numbered days mean, but it seems likely it's the age at slaughter.

 

Now that my photos are up, you will see that our chicken was brought to the table in a cast iron pan. Not only was the chicken piping hot (as I already mentioned), but the plates they gave us were hot as well.

 

We didn't see any "adorable" cocottes. But we did see one table being served Westermann's Baeckeoffe from what the menu describes as traditional Alsatian earthenware. It was tremendous, had a cover, and was gorgeous!

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We didn't see any "adorable" cocottes. But we did see one table being served Westermann's Baeckeoffe from what the menu describes as traditional Alsatian earthenware. It was tremendous, had a cover, and was gorgeous!

 

you just reminded me that i have a romertopf clay pot that i haven't used in ages. was this the pot for the baeckeoffe? 09OFF-master675-v2.jpg

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I just have one question: I noticed those numbers (110 days; 90 days) on the menu and assumed that's the age of the chicken at slaughter. Surely not how long it is held (aged) between slaughter and cooking? Can anyone confirm or correct?

Yes, days at slaughter.

 

These breeds take longer to reach market weights than the Perdue, et. al. birds do/ Which also means they actually develop some bone structure and musculature.

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For the record, Mr. RBI is my dh Michael. To expand a bit on what he wrote....

Come on, guys.

 

We don't want "expansions". We want vicious intersposal disagreements.

 

I mean, really.

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For the record, Mr. RBI is my dh Michael. To expand a bit on what he wrote....

Come on, guys.

 

We don't want "expansions". We want vicious intersposal disagreements.

 

I mean, really.

 

 

If it's not giving up privileged information: other than some of the Brits who no longer post and Lex+Deb, what spousal or spousal-equivalent teams are there? Or are we to count you + Liquid or you + Neocon as such?

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For the record, Mr. RBI is my dh Michael. To expand a bit on what he wrote....

Come on, guys.

 

We don't want "expansions". We want vicious intersposal disagreements.

 

I mean, really.

 

 

If it's not giving up privileged information: other than some of the Brits who no longer post and Lex+Deb, what spousal or spousal-equivalent teams are there? Or are we to count you + Liquid or you + Neocon as such?

 

 

AFAIK, you and mitchell have hit them all.

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