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The June/July 2016 Esquire has an article on Westermann and Le Coq Rico. It includes "his" recipe for roast chicken, which is pretty standard, but adds under "Chef's trick" instruction to poach the chicken over very low flame (below a boil) in homemade chicken broth for 30 to 40 minutes, then roast as usual, reducing roasting time by at least 30%. Advice to toss picked carcass back in the cooking liquid for soup base.

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The June/July 2016 Esquire has an article on Westermann and Le Coq Rico. It includes "his" recipe for roast chicken, which is pretty standard, but adds under "Chef's trick" instruction to poach the chicken over very low flame (below a boil) in homemade chicken broth for 30 to 40 minutes, then roast as usual, reducing roasting time by at least 30%. Advice to toss picked carcass back in the cooking liquid for soup base.

when describing the cooking process the host mentioned that the chicken was poached for many hours in the jus before roasting. sort of sounds like sous vide but the end result doesn't make me hate on that.

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Yeah, that's what was coming up for me. Thanks!

Avoiding a direct quote, the description I gave above of his poaching technique is complete. There is no more in the article.

 

Roasting procedure: Source the oldest bird you can. Rub inside of bird with 1/8 cup butter, then salt and pepper. Rub outside with 1/8 cup butter. Brush outside with 1/4 cup olive oil. Place chicken on its side and roast for 20 minutes in oven preheated to 400, frequently basting with pan juices. Turn onto its other side and roast for another 20 minutes, continuing to baste. Turn breast side up for additional 30 minutes, and of course, more basting. Remove from oven, check for doneness (clear juices), wrap in aluminum foil and rest bird on new pan. Roasting time: 1 hour, 20 minutes. (my note: which does not add up unless you include resting time)

 

Reduce oven temp to 350. Pour off half grease in pan. Replace pan in oven and let jus brown but not blacken. Add 1/4 cup water and scrape up fond.

 

Cut up bird and serve with reduced jus.

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I have a feeling it's old French, but again--I can't remember why I think I know that.

 

A lecturer at my college who was a great cook recommended removing the bones from the bird, poaching the bones, re-inserting them, then roasting it.

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One of the more difficult tasks I ever encountered - boning a chicken (forget about a quail) while keeping said chicken in one piece. Fortunately, only had to do that a couple of times.

i've done the boned chicken that you stuff with pate and sew back into its original shape. what a freaking nightmare

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