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Hunterdon County Inns


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Here is an overview of Inns in Hunterdon County. This is a very special area on NJ, with interesting River towns with boutique shopping and above average dining. Not all of these Inns still function for boarding, but bed and breakfasts abound in the area. Perryville Inn is still on my list to try, and I have not been to Ryland Inn in the last 12 months, but the others have been visited a minimum of 3 times each in the last 2 years.

 

1795, Perryville Inn- the oldest of the lot, I’ve heard that its very traditional, and yet a few reviews say its something very special.

 

1805, Frenchtown Inn- Frenchtown is a funky little town with a few bakeries, a few great interior design stores, and its closest to the Ship Inn ( 61 Bridge Street, Milford- a British pub with simply wonderful hand draught beers…eat first, terrible food) this Inn is starting to show some wear and tear…bathrooms, chair coverings..looks dingy and sometimes unclean. ( not to be confused with shabby chic) Food is standard, well prepared if uninspiring. Service is local, acceptable. Wine list is just ok,,not very diverse, well priced. Has a great authentic bar, and then one larger and I think one or maybe two smaller DR’s.

 

1860 , Stockton Inn- IMHO, one of the best in the lot. Has shown great improvement in the last year. This is the hotel referred to in the song

â€There’s a Small Hotel (w/ a wishing well) †in the 1937 B’way Rodgers and Hart Show, Babes in Arms. Well priced wine list, heavier on CA wines. Lovely outdoor seating. Service is a bit local, but above average. Each visit in the last 24 months was better than the last..and a new menu that began in Jan was interesting, food was a notch above what I expected. . A series of smaller DR’s, with murals and fireplaces, no room seating more than 20.

 

1734, Sergeantsville Inn- A catacomb of a place, probably the prettiest Inn of the bunch. Or at least the most authentic. Has an interesting game menu, which makes winter visits preferred. the kitchen does not seem to have a deft hand with seafood…or at least in what I’ve sampled. A wine list with some well priced choices, but in general tends to be overpriced for the area. ( note: close to maresca’s , NJâ€s most wonderful butcher shop)

 

1811-Harvest Moon..this has been updated, exterior is beautiful but the interior doesn’t have the integrity of an old Inn…I love the bar menu, and Stanley Novak, a River Café alumni, keeps up with the trends, is great at braises and stews…again, a wonderful Winter place with fireplaces and warm atmosphere..but the piano player is too loud, and slightly annoying. Has been known to take requests and play Disney songs ad nauseum.

 

1810 Ryland Inn- one of NJ’s most acclaimed restaurants, now has a more casual bistor area. Chef Shelton used to push the envelope, with some of the most wonderful food in NJ. I personally feel he’s become complacent, and is not breaking NEW GROUND. Yes, the place is still pretty as can be ( but needing paint and sprucing up) and the service is some of the best in central NJ, and the food is as good as any of the best in NJ…but I’ve always looked to be inspired, and my last few visits have just left me satiated.

1867- Lambertville Station- tends to get a bit touristy, but has great game dinners. Downstairs bar is non smoking,and serves pretty good sandwiches. Around the corner on Union St. is the Inn at the Hawke, with Dead Guy and Otter Creek on Tap, and hand cut chips served with vinegar, and great bar food.

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1795, Perryville Inn- the oldest of the lot, I’ve heard that its very traditional, and yet a few reviews say its something very special.

 

Kim thanks for your comments on the Perryville Inn, and welcome to mouthfuls. Dee and I have been there three times, and have enjoyed the warm fireplaces, and pleasant service. I believe each room has a fireplace

 

The food isn't especially cutting edge, but it's good, and reasonably priced. There's usually game on the menu. One drawback, for me at least, is the low ceilings in the colonial era rooms. This increases the noise level to a roar when the place is filled.

 

Friday night tends to draw a bar crowd, which can generate both noise and smoke for diners in the adjacent rooms

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  • 4 years later...

Nice writeup in the Ledger about the Frenchtown Inn, Segeantsville Inn and Maresca Butchers, and several places in Lambertville.

 

Before you see the general store, S. Maresca & Sons (609-397-3543) is on your right. Brothers Emil and Joe Maresca have been cutting meat, smoking sausage and making their own pate for more than 50 years. They took over the business from their father Otto, who also knew his way around a butcher block, a roll of brown paper and a spool of string.

 

It's still done the same way today, and to watch the Maresca brothers butcher a leg of lamb is like witnessing a lost art. People come from all over for fresh-cut meat, and a few months ago, the brothers decided to share their shop with Pat Bradley and Chris O'Leary, local sisters who bake delicious treats daily. They call themselves "Annie's Ice Box," and while you're waiting for your roast to be wrapped, pick up a fresh peach pie, some lemon squares or signature carrot cake for dessert.

 

 

Delaware River towns

If you take the opposite fork out of Stockton, you'll follow the curve of the Delaware and eventually drive right into Frenchtown, a lovely town along the river that's also filled with galleries and shops. The Frenchtown Inn (908-996-3300) was built in 1805, and chef/owner Andrew Tomko has lovingly restored the property. There's a grill room menu and a dining room menu, and while it's all exceptional, I'm partial to the grill room's plate of country, garlic sausage and poultry pates, accompanied by game liver mousse. It comes with toasted croustades, Cumberland sauce and whole grain mustard. If you appreciate pates and terrines, make sure you try this dish.
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  • 1 year later...

Frenchtown Inn is reviewed in the Star-Ledger

 

The Frenchtown Inn has it all: captivating food, caring service, a lovely atmosphere, even peace and quiet. Want more? If it’s a nice day, dine on the porch and watch life go lazily by in a serene town on the Delaware River.

 

The handsome, white-columned inn has been a local landmark since 1805. Inside, brick walls hosting wine bottle displays add rustic flair, contrasting with the sophistication of white tablecloths, candles under hurricane lamps, fresh flowers and crystal chandeliers. It all sets the scene for a special culinary production.

 

 

Review

 

Entrees are well-composed. Even one of the least expensive, the roast organic breast of chicken ($24), gets a flourish, served over a fricassee of spinach, mushrooms and crabmeat in a white wine sauce that elevates this basic poultry.

 

The most expensive entree, roast rack of Australia lamb ($35), is a little less frilly, accompanied by mushroom risotto and baby vegetables in a port wine jus.

 

I wanted the fanciest dish I could find, and the roast Magret duck breast with quail perched next to it fit the bill. Quite a bargain at $25, it featured an apple/apricot stuffing and orange tarragon sweet potato puree, the multiplicity of flavors playing into each other without being forced.

 

Another example of ingenuity is the salmon wrapped in Napa cabbage and French brick leaves ($24). (They left the bricks on the walls; in this case, it refers to pastry.) A tingly Dijon beurre blanc sets up the fish for appreciation, while asparagus and garlic whipped potatoes are the finishing touches.

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  • 1 year later...

Nice write up on Lilly's Meals in Stockton. Formerly Meil's, the establishment has kept many of the old traits but now accepts credit cards.

 

 

Homey favorites that will be recognized by Meil’s regulars include the very filling corn fritters with raspberry mayo ($9), potato pancakes ($9) that are a meal in themselves when combined with sour cream and applesauce (or salmon, $13), and house-made marshmallows to dress up the cocoa.

Portions are large, making the place a real value. Kids can scribble with thoughtfully provided crayons on the paper overlaying the brown tablecloths, or play with the mismatched salt and pepper shakers.


Though there’s plenty they can eat, such as the Little Chicken Pot Pie ($7) with homemade noodles, much of the food has welcome additions that lift it well beyond the ordinary. Crisp eggplant fries ($7) are meltingly soft inside and can be dipped in a whipped potato garlic aioli; an enormous roasted beet salad ($12) has a scattering of cashews over dates and roasted sweet potato, with goat cheese crostini on the side to ease the sweetness; grilled chicken breast ($22) is paired with locally made artisanal sausage.

There are just five entrees on the menu (more are available as specials), with a huge grilled ribeye ($30) the most expensive item. It’s quite the main course with a pile of french fries and vegetables (unfortunately, our sauteed broccoli was barely cooked). Parchment-baked organic Scottish salmon ($25) isn’t overdressed, but gets touched up just enough with herb butter and lemon, atop a pile of vegetables.

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/dining/index.ssf/2013/02/post_16.html

 

Lilly’s Meals, Bridge and North Main streets, Stockton. (609) 397-8033, lillysgourmet.com.

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Interesting, Paul. I gather this is the same Lilly that operates Lilly's in Lambertville, a place I like a lot. Stockton is a dreamy little village, but I don't venture out there until late-April, when it is glorious out in Hunterdon.

 

I do miss Atrio in Stockton, had several good meals there in the past-- is anything in that space by the bridge?

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  • 6 months later...

The Munchmobile visited Lilly's, and cited its french fries as one of their favorite items. That and the Tullamore burger. Several other items were sub-par, however.

 

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/dining/index.ssf/2013/08/Munchmobile_rides_off_into_sunset_last_trip_of_the_summer_uncovers_scenic_savory_surprises.html#incart_river

 

 

Tullamore Farms is a local (Stockton area) beef farm. It's highly regarded in the trade, from what I understand. Their natural, local beef is in the favor of the Princeton farm to market restaurants, among others. It was featured in a recent issue of Edible Jersey magazine.

 

http://tullamorefarms.com/products.html

 

 

I have plans to get down to the area for an overnight sometime soon. Dinner at the Pass in Rosemont, probably stay over in Lambertville or New Hope. Stop by the PA State Liquor Store over in New Hope.

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The Munchmobile visited Lilly's, and cited its french fries as one of their favorite items. That and the Tullamore burger. Several other items were sub-par, however.

 

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/dining/index.ssf/2013/08/Munchmobile_rides_off_into_sunset_last_trip_of_the_summer_uncovers_scenic_savory_surprises.html#incart_river

 

 

Tullamore Farms is a local (Stockton area) beef farm. It's highly regarded in the trade, from what I understand. Their natural, local beef is in the favor of the Princeton farm to market restaurants, among others. It was featured in a recent issue of Edible Jersey magazine.

 

http://tullamorefarms.com/products.html

 

 

I have plans to get down to the area for an overnight sometime soon. Dinner at the Pass in Rosemont, probably stay over in Lambertville or New Hope. Stop by the PA State Liquor Store over in New Hope.

Info on The Pass in Rosemont here: http://njmonthly.com/blogs/tablehopwithRosie/2013/9/4/restaurant-news.html#read_more

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Sergeantsville Inn received a three star rating from the Star Ledger, with a good narrative. A goose special is pretty unusual.

 

 

A pan-roasted goose special ($28) was updated from its Charles Dickens persona with cherry-brandy sauce and wild rice. Its cousin on the regular lineup, pan-roasted pheasant ($28), has a more woodsy nature, complemented by wild mushroom risotto and a well-tailored Chardonnay/shallot pan gravy, all very subtle.

Talk to people who frequent the inn and they’ll probably tell you the signature tomato bisque ($6.50) is their fave. It’s comforting and slightly creamy, with a squiggle of crème fraîche on top.

 

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/dining/index.ssf/2013/09/sergeantsville_inn_has_historic_charm_and_charming_food.html

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