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Cooking very aged beef?


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Lock the food safety guy in a room and take them out of the fridge long enough before cooking so they're really close to room temp. Cook a bit less than you usually do as lower moisture content offers a more "cooked" texture.

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The room temperature thing?

 

Bullshit - at least according to the authority:

 

The Takeaway: Don't bother letting your steaks rest at room temperature. Rather, dry them very thoroughly on paper towels before searing. Or better yet, salt them and let them rest uncovered on a rack in the fridge for a night or two, so that their surface moisture can evaporate.

 

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p.s. yes of course you want a dry surface and hopefully you fridge dry with salt that you then wipe off with the liquid, but you want both the temperature gradient AND the temperature increase. (if you just want the increase then sure, toss it in a bag and send it swimming)

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Don't shoot me; I'm only the messenger.

 

Sometimes I like a steak cooked to 130°F thorughout; as you mentioned, there's only one way to accomplish that.

 

Other times, I prefer medium rare, with a gradient.

 

But I'd be surprised if major steak-cooking restaurants are leaving their steaks out at room temp for any lenght of time. I wound venture a guess that when a steak is ordered, it's pulled out of the low boy, salted, and fired.

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I agree with Orik 100%. Let that meat sit out until room temp. Cold raw meat just has less flavor than warm meat.

Don't shoot me; I'm only the messenger.

 

Sometimes I like a steak cooked to 130°F thorughout; as you mentioned, there's only one way to accomplish that.

 

Other times, I prefer medium rare, with a gradient.

 

 

An alternative is to flash SEAR it on both sides stovetop, tuck in 350 oven for, say, 7-10 minutes depending on thickness (everything depends on thickness), checking with instant read thermometer. I pull out at 125, and let rest for at least 15 minutes.

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i left a steak in my car last night in a cooler, the cooler had no ice in it or ice pack,., I felt it this morning and it was cold to the touch... I will let you know if I die or not..

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Remember - I'm just the messenger...

 

Chef Michael Lomonaco, former head chef at Windows on the World in the World Trade Center and current head chef at Porter House New York and Center Bar knocks down these myths.

Myth 1: Bring the Steak to Room Temperature Before Cooking it

"I like to cook my steak cold, right out of the refrigerator. You want your grill to be searing hot and the steak to hit it icy cold." This helps control the cooking temperature of the steak, said Lomonaco. "When you cook with a room temperature steak, it cooks much faster. Cooking with cold steaks allows you to control the temperature more, resulting in a perfectly cooked steak."

 

 

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i left a steak in my car last night in a cooler, the cooler had no ice in it or ice pack,., I felt it this morning and it was cold to the touch... I will let you know if I die or not..

Food safety rules make sense, They protect us from the dimwits and dingbats in restaurant and home kitchens. Better have a rule that protects everyone than teach the actual danger points at which food has been mishandled.

 

re JtF's quote, I, too, have been recently reading recs to cook meat straight from the fridge. A different technique that obviously works for some who understand how to work it. I hang by the rule taught me years ago by a retired pro tennis champion who failed trying to sell me his line. He acknowledged that I had made the right decision, telling me, "Never quit a winning ballgame."

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But I'd be surprised if major steak-cooking restaurants are leaving their steaks out at room temp for any lenght of time. I wound venture a guess that when a steak is ordered, it's pulled out of the low boy, salted, and fired.

 

Yup, then sometimes served sliced sitting in very hot suet on a very hot plate. Or as Wilf says, sometimes with a cold center.

 

But at home you can do better in the cold center front without resorting to suet baths.

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