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What's wrong with Sous Vide here?


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Agree about meat - doesn't do anything you can't get by grilling, searing etc...

 

Rich, chefs like sous vide because it makes meat preparation easier when serving everyone in a large crowd at the same time.

 

The meat preparation is MUCH more difficult (and problematic) if "grilling, searing" for the whole preparation process.

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When used correctly, and usually with an ensuing sear, what is the big-time knock here on this Board with Sous Vide, especially when it is used for a large dinner crowd with everyone to be served all

My alternative to sous vide for eggs:  

Rich, chefs like sous vide because it makes meat preparation easier when serving everyone in a large crowd at the same time.   The meat preparation is MUCH more difficult (and problematic) if "gri

 

Agree about meat - doesn't do anything you can't get by grilling, searing etc...

 

Rich, chefs like sous vide because it makes meat preparation easier when serving everyone in a large crowd at the same time.

 

The meat preparation is MUCH more difficult (and problematic) if "grilling, searing" for the whole preparation process.

 

 

But I disagree slightly. With a sous vide steak, for example, you get the meat cooked to the same degree of doneness throughout the product. That doesn't happen with grilling. Whether or not someone wants a steak cooked to the same degree of doneness throughout is another question altogether.

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Joe, in any case, steaks can't be cooked to an individual's preference for a large crowd.

 

Having said this, I see sous vide more commonly used for large cuts of meat other than steaks. I can't recall ever seeing steaks prepared via sous vide (but maybe my memory is [once again?] failing me).

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I learned fool-proof egg poaching from a guest chef on a Martha Stewart segment. He tipped each egg into simmering acidulated water, immediately used a large spoon to roll the egg over onto itself, spooning water over it. The egg immediately forms a tight ball. Then add next egg.

 

Yes. I've done that. The egg poacher is more fool-proofer! :D

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Just as it's none of my (or anyone's) business what people do in their bedroom, the same holds true in the kitchen. In restaurants, however, I find plenty of reasons to rail against sous-vide cooking. Since no one here and elsewhere can't or won't write about aspects that go beyond the taste and texture comparisons, here are some other reasons why sous-vide cooking is not my friend.

 

Sous-vide, as it promotes the convergence between institutional and creative or personal cooking, is a crutch that makes life easier for people who hire incompetent or poorly-trained cooks-some of whom want to be about the only person in the kitchen- and otherwise maximize their revenue. As such it limits the way people make food and relegates technically-challenging, time-tested, complicated and, to a large extent, better-tasting food that is being put out of existence by its ever-growing use in restaurants.

 

Because sous-vide allows for stockpiling food, it goes hand in glove with degustation, no-choice restaurants.

 

Sous-vide is inexorably killing Romanticism. The phenomenon of a chef going to a greenmarket or a food hall and coming up with dishes “on the spot” is on the way out. So is that of a chef lording over a dish that he is cooking, looking, tweaking and tasting as it develops over a flame. (When Andrew Carmellini launched Lafayette, he said he wouldn’t use sous-vide there because it takes the love out of cooking.)

 

What may be the most distressing aspect of sous-vide to those to whom restaurant-going is meaningful is what it does for the sense of smell. Just as wine has a nose or bouquet, so does food where it plays a critical role in enjoying it. Some of my vivid culinary memories come from walking past the kitchen of a fine restaurant taking in the delightful, overwhelming appeal to my nose or the odor from a whole duck or chicken wafting across the dining room. The Internet has pages of complaints about foul smells from sous-vide users, but since I’m talking about restaurant kitchens, what I remember most about Can Roca (the #1 restaurant in the San Pellegrino Top Fifty), other than the thoroughly terrible meal was being allowed to visit their odorless kitchen.

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the brigades at a lot of the SV temples are big enough where you could cook everything a la minute and have people specialize in sides of the protein

 

"I only cook the dorsal side"

 

Yes but that would divert people from the tweezer station.

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I bought an ANOVA (because SWMBO) and have mixed feelings about it. Some things have been great some meh. The best application so far has been boneless turkey breasts. It was the juiciest I have ever cooked and made great sandwiches.

 

How long until we have ready to cook meals in the freezer isle that you just drop in the sous vide

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<snip>

 

How long until we have ready to cook meals in the freezer isle that you just drop in the sous vide

 

Are you too young to remember boil-in bags? Lucky you.

 

The only thing like that my mother used to by was creamed spinach.

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