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Vanessa

Lamb

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i just called the store - the butcher told me it's the same cut as the one in beef.

I'll try to make a pic.

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Could it be something like this? What I'd call a cheffy cut, not something you'd generally get in a butcher.

 

A reason to be cheerful - spoonful of the ensopada liquid before going to bed. How can something so simple be so tasty? The meat still needs a bit of time to break down that sinewy stuff you get on the breast.

 

v

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I made pix now but i need to wait until Alex gets back home to download them to my laptop. Judging from the pictures above it seems like it's cut from a top round as for cutlet looking like a flank steak.

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Lamb stock completed this morning. I finished simmering it last night and left overnight to cool down. This morning strained and the fat had solidified enough without refrigeration to strain itself out as well. Usually I would now boil down further to concentrate before freezing but on tasting it seemed quite lamby enough - unusually flavourful for a stock at this stage. Decanted into plastic containers and froze. A very dark colour it is considering there was no roasting of the bones - perhaps due to use of a red onion (I don't peel onions for stock).

 

I've really enjoyed this animal. No question that I'll be acquiring another one in some months time and having more fun.

 

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For us, lamb shoulder (on the bone) is for roasting, stud with rosemary and garlic, then Gas6/7 for 20 minutes, then 20 minutes a pound at gas 4/5. Rest for 10 minutes before carving. We like our lamb pink. The remainder is minced for shepherds pie.

Leg of lamb is usually butterflied and BBQ'd, preferably using Elizabeth Luard's version of furria-furria. Scallions, halved if of the large continental variety, and soused in olive oil before BBQ'ing, are an excellent accompaniment.

The neck fillet can be chunked for kebabs or fried whole and cut into medallions with a suitable gravy.

We rarely bother with chops.

The best lamb I've eaten was Essex salt marsh lamb which came from The Food Company in Essex http://www.thefoodcompany.co.uk/index.html closely followed by a tiny shoulder from a Soay sheep grown at Norwood Farm, Norton St Phillip in Somerset http://www.soilassociation.org/web/sa/sawe...33;OpenDocument .

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We are having lamb tomorrow. I am glad we bought it earlier in the week; the stores were jammed today. You;d think they'd been closed for a week rather than just yesterday. It's a boneless roast; I don't know what Mr. Fly is planning to do with it but I will report back.

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I love to eat lamb but rarely cook it. Today I bought a boneless leg which I'll be cooking tomorrow for a small gathering at my neighbors' house. I'm not sure, but I think I'm going to try to follow Judy Rodgers' instructions in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. That means seasoning it now, I think, and a simple roast tomorrow. I'll report.

 

Happy holiday (whichever you celebrate, or not) everyone!

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Okay, so I trimmed and seasoned the lamb according to Rodgers' directions. Yay. It will be roasted tomorrow.

 

But now I'm left with about half a pound of fat/trimmings and maybe 3/4 cup of blood. No bones = no stock, right? So what do I do with this extra stuff?

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I'm cooking Marcus Samuelsson's Za'atar Roasted Leg of Lamb, from "The Soul of a new cuisine." Seems very familiar flavor-wise, with black olive oil paste, sesame, anchovies, rosemary, garlic...

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I love to eat lamb but rarely cook it. Today I bought a boneless leg which I'll be cooking tomorrow for a small gathering at my neighbors' house. I'm not sure, but I think I'm going to try to follow Judy Rodgers' instructions in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. That means seasoning it now, I think, and a simple roast tomorrow. I'll report.

 

Happy holiday (whichever you celebrate, or not) everyone!

 

 

Okay, so I trimmed and seasoned the lamb according to Rodgers' directions. Yay. It will be roasted tomorrow.

 

But now I'm left with about half a pound of fat/trimmings and maybe 3/4 cup of blood. No bones = no stock, right? So what do I do with this extra stuff?

I think Rogers' method of pre-salting/seasoning is brilliant. I haven't tried it with lamb, but if it's anywhere near as good as the rack of pork treatment, you're in for a treat. Next time you buy boneless, see if the butcher has any bones (lots of stores sell the lamb bones when they're boning out a lot of legs) and you can make a nice lamb stock. No good ideas for trim and blood. Wait a minute, how did you end up with 3/4 cup of lamb blood, anyway?

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Well it was half a cup at least, I was surprised at how much blood there was.

 

Next time I will ask for bones. Thank you!

 

I'm looking forward to the roast. Judy Rodgers' methods have so far proved infallible for me.

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Well it was half a cup at least, I was surprised at how much blood there was.

 

Next time I will ask for bones. Thank you!

 

I'm looking forward to the roast. Judy Rodgers' methods have so far proved infallible for me.

 

So, how did it turn out?

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