Jump to content
DanM

Lettuce overload

Recommended Posts

my nana used to make a casserole with grits and collard greens, definitely rib sticking. i'd probably deconstruct that and stew the greens and serve over grits (the real coarse kind, not the instant). cooking your grits and your greens in stock rather than water adds a nice lift in the flavors

 

Every time someone mentions 'instant grits', a Southern Grandma spins in her grave :ph43r: :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a side note re: grits: I just made some Bloody Butcher grits using corn stock instead of water. Marginally better, although the BB start from such an exalted place of corn-ness, it's hard to improve them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

my nana used to make a casserole with grits and collard greens, definitely rib sticking. i'd probably deconstruct that and stew the greens and serve over grits (the real coarse kind, not the instant). cooking your grits and your greens in stock rather than water adds a nice lift in the flavors

 

Every time someone mentions 'instant grits', a Southern Grandma spins in her grave :ph43r: :P

 

omg, yassss!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's CSA season again. I see last year I didn't know what to do with fennel fronds and I find myself scratching my head again. I also have two bunches of mint. Any ideas there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're not going to make a bunch of Mint Juleps, here are a couple of things.

 

Make a mint pesto - it will freeze well.

 

Mint or Chocolate Mint Ice Cream is very good.

 

Take some, steep and make a mint oil. Very nice on fish and fruit desserts, especially watermelon.

 

Use some in green pea soup or sauteed peas with butter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'thekitchn.com' gives the below suggestions for using fennel fronds:

 

Most recipes with fennel, like our Shaved Fennel, Roasted Tomato, and Pistachio Salad from yesterday, focus on the crunchy bulb, leaving us in a lurch when it comes to the leftover stalks and fronds. Fennel tops are tasty too! No sense in letting these greens go to waste. Here are some favorite ways to use them up.

The lacy fronds have a delicate anise flavor and are so tender that they practically melt in your mouth. Think of them as herbs, just like dill or tarragon. They don't hold up well to long cooking, but are best used fresh.

The stalks also have that signature mild licorice flavor, but are much tougher. To use them raw, I like to chop them very finely to break apart their tough fibers. They also do well if cooked.

1. Add the Leafy Fronds to Salads: Strip the fronds from the stalks and toss them in your next green salad. They'll add just the faintest hint of licorice to each bite.

2. Make Fennel Pesto: As Sara Kate would be quick to point out, any green is pesto waiting to happen. Try tossing fennel pesto with pasta or rubbing it onto meat before roasting.

3. Use Stalks and Fronds for Cooking Fish: Fennel and fish have been best friends since the dawn of cooking. Whether you're grilling, poaching, or steaming, laying a few stalks and fronds alongside the fish will infuse the fish with sweet fennel-tastic flavor.

4. Juice 'Em Up: If you have a juicer, you need look no further. You won't get a lot of juice from the tops (unless you have a lot of fronds!), but what you do get can be mixed with other juiced fruits and vegetables.

5. Save for Stock: If inspiration fails to strike, at the very least you can stick the stalks and fronds in the freezer and save them for the next time you make vegetable or chicken stock. It's not for everyone, but I really like the sweet undertone that fennel gives to stocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's CSA season again. I see last year I didn't know what to do with fennel fronds and I find myself scratching my head again. I also have two bunches of mint. Any ideas there?

 

 

If you're not going to make a bunch of Mint Juleps, here are a couple of things.

 

Make a mint pesto - it will freeze well.

 

Mint or Chocolate Mint Ice Cream is very good.

 

Take some, steep and make a mint oil. Very nice on fish and fruit desserts, especially watermelon.

 

Use some in green pea soup or sauteed peas with butter.

 

Cacik!

 

But I'd also go broader with Rich's initial suggestion; cocktails.

 

Julep

Gin Gin Mule - thanks, Audrey

French Pearl - thanks, Audrey

Old Cuban - thanks, Audrey

Queen's Park Swizzle

 

And you can make a nice mint simple syrup, which will keep for a while in your fridge (especially if you add a tablespoonful of vodka to it), and use that to sweeten your iced tea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about to make some mint-cilantro chutney with the half-bunch of mint I can find no other use for. (Well, not this minute. Sometime later today.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A chutney is actually a good idea for me. (Alas not a cocktail person).

 

And I just found a CSA holy grail recipe: kohlrabi pancakes with haloumi and bacon -- from the Softamiz cookbook. It calls for Swiss chard, mint, green onions and says I can sub zucchini for kohlrabi: all in the CSA this week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

larb is a good way of using up quite a lot of mint. Also vietnamese/Laotian salads -- pound the mint with raw garlic and chilli, sugar, lime, fish sauce, pour over tomatoes or whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, mint has to be used so sparingly. I do mint in a watermelon salad sometimes but, it often ruins dishes for me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking the road of our French hosts, we have started serving hot mint "tea" after dinners. Guests who would normally dither over coffee-tea-herbal choices now are not asked and are universally pleased with this. Just steep a big handful of mint in boiling water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, mint has to be used so sparingly. I do mint in a watermelon salad sometimes but, it often ruins dishes for me

Yes. I can do a bit more peppermint but even then it's difficult

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...