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Jewish Delis in NYC?

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When we moved to the UWS in 1964, we had a number of choices of old style Jewish delis within delivery distance. Gitlitz, Tip Toe Inn (more a restaurant serving deli), Fine and Shapiro, Barney Greengrass, Hebrew National, Steinberg's dairy. Several still exist, fortunately, but I miss Steinbergs and Gitlitz. I recall eating hot dogs many times next to Isaac B. Singer in a small deli on Broadway near 86th. He lived in the building.

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My favorite comment after the article:

 

American "Jewish" food is a disgusting monstrosity, unhealthy and is unknown to Jews outside America. You can't find that trash in Israel, and nobody consumed it (in its American form) in the old country. Generally, ethnic food deteriorates once it becomes American - same for Italian, Greek, "Chinese", Middle-Eastern, Turkish etc. food. The American ethnic food closest to its motherland origins is Polish.

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You can find an abundance of "New York Jewish food" in south Florida. It's hard to avoid it, sometimes.

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I always thought it was funny when I visited my parents there that it could be 99 degrees out and humid as all getout and they'd still want to go to the transplanted Madison Restaurant for brisket in brown gravy.

 

There's a reason this cuisine originated in NORTHERN Europe.

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But Florida warm it's not.

 

(However, I'm always somewhat bewildered as to how heavy some tropical countries' food can be, like Puerto Rico's.)

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Northern Europe, then presumably expanded in scale and weight in the States (the familiar phenomenon of a poor community demonstrating generosity and a sense of plenty).

 

Stripped of the pejoratives, those comments are roughly true of Irish-American, Chinese-American, Italian-American, etc cuisines.

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But Florida warm it's not.

 

(However, I'm always somewhat bewildered as to how heavy some tropical countries' food can be, like Puerto Rico's.)

All stodgy carbs, innit?

 

(I.M. Tony Finch.)

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Northern Europe, then presumably expanded in scale and weight in the States (the familiar phenomenon of a poor community demonstrating generosity and a sense of plenty).

 

Stripped of the pejoratives, those comments are roughly true of Irish-American, Chinese-American, Italian-American, etc cuisines.

This is a brilliant observation! And it's insistence for "sense of plenty" transcends generations. I am sure that Daniel Rose came from a family that practiced no economies. yet he channels his mother with his demand that his diners leave beyond sated. Same for my Italian-American and Austrian-American in-laws who looked back to great-grandmothers' tables.

 

Not so for my New England ancestors. Count the number of guests = the number of carrots! :o

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American "Jewish" food is a disgusting monstrosity, unhealthy and is unknown to Jews outside America. You can't find that trash in Israel

 

That's a pretty curious statement. Other than the beefy aspects, which are of course native to the US, the food is mostly the Ashkenazi food that we grew up eating. Not to mention Israel, not being the old country (well, being the very old country) should have seen the same issues amplified as everyone is 1st-4th generation of poor immigrants.

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When we moved to the UWS in 1964, we had a number of choices of old style Jewish delis within delivery distance. Gitlitz, Tip Toe Inn (more a restaurant serving deli), Fine and Shapiro, Barney Greengrass, Hebrew National, Steinberg's dairy. Several still exist, fortunately, but I miss Steinbergs and Gitlitz. I recall eating hot dogs many times next to Isaac B. Singer in a small deli on Broadway near 86th. He lived in the building.

 

Before 1956 or so, when he became a vegetarian? (according to his publisher) Or were those hot dogs his very guilty pleasure?

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When we moved to the UWS in 1964, we had a number of choices of old style Jewish delis within delivery distance. Gitlitz, Tip Toe Inn (more a restaurant serving deli), Fine and Shapiro, Barney Greengrass, Hebrew National, Steinberg's dairy. Several still exist, fortunately, but I miss Steinbergs and Gitlitz. I recall eating hot dogs many times next to Isaac B. Singer in a small deli on Broadway near 86th. He lived in the building.

 

Before 1956 or so, when he became a vegetarian? (according to his publisher) Or were those hot dogs his very guilty pleasure?

 

"Finally, in the mid-1960s, I made up my mind. And I've been a vegetarian ever since."

 

I referred to 1963-65 when we moved from W.72 to W 86th st. There was a tiny deli in the Belnord on Broadway near the corner. I liked their boiled hot dogs. Singer was in there several times when I was. I noticed the old Jews at the roll separate from the hot dog, which I always thought was odd.

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