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prasantrin

Chile Verde recipe anyone?

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I'm hoping to make a kick ass chile verde for a with chile cook off. My cousin's wife makes an awesome one, but she doesn't use a recipe and just throws things in a pot. All I know is to roast some peppers (jalapeno and anaheims, or maybe not anaheims but poblanos?) and tomatillos. Then blend them together. Brown some pork shoulder. I vaguely remember onions in there too. And cumin. There were likely more thing, but those were the important ones. No amounts, just whatever she feels like.

 

I've done some research and thought the serious eats recipe looked good, and easy enough. Plus the ingredients seem to match what my cousin's wife uses.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/01/chile-verde-with-pork-recipe.html

 

But my mother said she also mentioned using white wine. I kind of doubt this, as she's Mexican and what traditional chile verde recipe has white wine? But it would add complexity to my chile, and might give me an edge in the competition! So thinking of that, i found a guy fieri recipe on food network (i know i know) which is still similar to my cousin's wife's recipe with the addition of white wine and also white vinegar.

 

What say you all? Do white wine and vinegar belong in chile verde? Do i go with the serious eats recipe or guy fieri? Or does anyone have another kick ass recipe I could try?

 

This is all pending the availability of tomatillos, of course. Too late to grow any, but I'm hopeful I'll find some!

 

(Apologies, but I'm restricted to posting via my phone, so there may be typos all over this post. And i tried a search, but the mobile friendly site does not make that easy, though i did find a sort of recipe from Steven Dilley)

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Serious Eats, sí; Guy Fieri, ¡nunca!

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I think white wine would be a good addition, but you'd have to use it to deglaze the pan after sautéing the aromatics and the pork. And then reduce it so you just get the essence.

 

The Serious Eats version reads like it will be pretty mild, with the preponderance of mild chiles (poblanos and cubanelle tend to have very little heat). I like it better tjam GF's, which doesn't char the chiles. If you can get tomatillos, do use them; they will add a nice tartness as well as unctuousness. GFuses an awful lot of onion.

 

BTW: In a pinch, you might be able to buy canned tomatillos. If you drain them well, you might even be able to char them.

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Poor Guy Fieri!

 

I bought some pork butt today since it was on sale and did some recon on chile availability. I can definitely get Anaheim, serrano, and jalapeño chiles. I can't have it too spicy since I'm serving it to mostly plain palate folks. So I'm thinking of using a few anaheims, and a couple of jalapeños. I think the serranos might be too hot, but if I can find a single one (all but the jalapeños were sold in packs), I will throw it in, too.

 

No luck on the tomatillos, fresh or canned, at my local major grocery store, but there are a few other places I can check out next weekend. I'm crossing my fingers that I won't have to make a quick trip to the US next week!

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Poor Guy Fieri!

 

I bought some pork butt today since it was on sale and did some recon on chile availability. I can definitely get Anaheim, serrano, and jalapeño chiles. I can't have it too spicy since I'm serving it to mostly plain palate folks. So I'm thinking of using a few anaheims, and a couple of jalapeños. I think the serranos might be too hot, but if I can find a single one (all but the jalapeños were sold in packs), I will throw it in, too.

 

No luck on the tomatillos, fresh or canned, at my local major grocery store, but there are a few other places I can check out next weekend. I'm crossing my fingers that I won't have to make a quick trip to the US next week!

amazon

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$13 for two cans on amazon.ca. Haven't found single cans for sale yet, but I only looked up to page two.

 

I know I've seen it somewhere in town. I think one of the smaller Vietnamese grocery stores used to carry it. Oddly, they used to have the largest selection of Mexican provisions in town, but I haven't been there in well over a year, so I don't know if they still care them.

 

I still have a tiny bit of hope that I might find some fresh ones. I know I've seen some at the farmer's market, but since it's most definitely fall now, they may not have any left to harvest.

 

Thanks for the suggestion, though!

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If I can't get fresh hatches, I'll look for Bueno Brand- frozen, and mix one medium and one hot, and it seems to come out about right. You may be surprised to find them at your local. Here's the store locator: https://buenofoods.com/store-locator/

 

I do this (I don't measure either): toss the pork chunks with salt, pepper and wondra flour. I like to get the browning. Saute in batches and remove.

 

Deglaze with Tequila! Pour the remaining liquid over the removed porky bits.

 

Oil, Onions, ground cumin, ground coriander. The chopped peppers. If fresh, char and peel, if not, add. Once it's all wilty, add the pork back. Use chicken stock for more liquid as needed, let simmer together at least 2 hours. Salt and pepper to taste- toss in some cayenne if you need more heat.

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Thanks for the suggestions CheeseMonger! I like the idea of deglazing the pan with tequila. If I can find a little bottle, I'll give it a try. Right now my plan is to use beer in place of some of the chicken stock but I think the tequila will complement the beer nicely (I don't drink much, though, so if I'm wrong, please let me know!)

 

I managed to find some rather small tomatillos, some maybe not quite ripe (very deep green), but at least I got two pounds worth! I broiled them with some garlic cloves, three anaheims, and two each poblanos, serranos, and jalapenos. Then I threw it all in my vitamix (chiles peeled and seeded, garlic peeled) with a handful of cilantro leaves. It's a little smoother than I'd like, but I'm ok with it. It is a bit spicier than most gringos in these parts can handle, but hopefully once the other parts get added in, it'll be fine.

 

My contest was postponed till next week, so this is going in the freezer unless that's a bad idea?

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Do you add raw garlic or would you roast it? I only roasted and added 3 cloves. The recipe called for six but I was worried it would be too garlicky.

 

I can still add more when I put everything together, like when I do the onions.

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I chop the garlic as raw product, never tried roasting it first. Could be a nice variation. I like the bite of raw garlic in salsa verde.

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I'm hoping to make a kick ass chile verde for a with chile cook off. My cousin's wife makes an awesome one, but she doesn't use a recipe and just throws things in a pot. All I know is to roast some peppers (jalapeno and anaheims, or maybe not anaheims but poblanos?) and tomatillos. Then blend them together. Brown some pork shoulder. I vaguely remember onions in there too. And cumin. There were likely more thing, but those were the important ones. No amounts, just whatever she feels like.

 

I've done some research and thought the serious eats recipe looked good, and easy enough. Plus the ingredients seem to match what my cousin's wife uses.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/01/chile-verde-with-pork-recipe.html

 

But my mother said she also mentioned using white wine. I kind of doubt this, as she's Mexican and what traditional chile verde recipe has white wine? But it would add complexity to my chile, and might give me an edge in the competition! So thinking of that, i found a guy fieri recipe on food network (i know i know) which is still similar to my cousin's wife's recipe with the addition of white wine and also white vinegar.

 

What say you all? Do white wine and vinegar belong in chile verde? Do i go with the serious eats recipe or guy fieri? Or does anyone have another kick ass recipe I could try?

 

This is all pending the availability of tomatillos, of course. Too late to grow any, but I'm hopeful I'll find some!

 

(Apologies, but I'm restricted to posting via my phone, so there may be typos all over this post. And i tried a search, but the mobile friendly site does not make that easy, though i did find a sort of recipe from Steven Dilley)

 

i would use hatch chiles, i also really enjoy adding masa to mine, a nice hit of cumin, tomatillos, lime juice and onions..But, the masa thickens it and gives it a wonderful flavor. Also, nothing beats hatch.. also, if you can brown the meat in lard, that would be nice too

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I'm hoping to make a kick ass chile verde for a with chile cook off. My cousin's wife makes an awesome one, but she doesn't use a recipe and just throws things in a pot. All I know is to roast some peppers (jalapeno and anaheims, or maybe not anaheims but poblanos?) and tomatillos. Then blend them together. Brown some pork shoulder. I vaguely remember onions in there too. And cumin. There were likely more thing, but those were the important ones. No amounts, just whatever she feels like.

 

I've done some research and thought the serious eats recipe looked good, and easy enough. Plus the ingredients seem to match what my cousin's wife uses.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/01/chile-verde-with-pork-recipe.html

 

But my mother said she also mentioned using white wine. I kind of doubt this, as she's Mexican and what traditional chile verde recipe has white wine? But it would add complexity to my chile, and might give me an edge in the competition! So thinking of that, i found a guy fieri recipe on food network (i know i know) which is still similar to my cousin's wife's recipe with the addition of white wine and also white vinegar.

 

What say you all? Do white wine and vinegar belong in chile verde? Do i go with the serious eats recipe or guy fieri? Or does anyone have another kick ass recipe I could try?

 

This is all pending the availability of tomatillos, of course. Too late to grow any, but I'm hopeful I'll find some!

 

(Apologies, but I'm restricted to posting via my phone, so there may be typos all over this post. And i tried a search, but the mobile friendly site does not make that easy, though i did find a sort of recipe from Steven Dilley)

 

i would use hatch chiles, i also really enjoy adding masa to mine, a nice hit of cumin, tomatillos, lime juice and onions..But, the masa thickens it and gives it a wonderful flavor. Also, nothing beats hatch.. also, if you can brown the meat in lard, that would be nice too

 

if you don't have lard use bacon fat

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I'm adding lard to my shopping list. I love lard, plus I need some for my empanadas (if I ever get around to making them).

 

I can't get hatch chiles, even canned or frozen ones. The closest I can get is the jarred sauce made from hatch chiles that I can sometimes get at the Canadian version of TJ Maxx.

 

I'll see if I can find masa. Do you mean the masa like Maseca instant masa? I think I can get that. But any other kind, and I'm SOL.

 

I live in a Mexican food/provisions desert, and it's a 7-hour drive to the nearest oasis.

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