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One of my seminal cheese experiences was a Double Gloucester from P and W but that was a long time ago. I don't have much to add to the excellent recommendations above; it slightly depends where you are based. I like La Cave a Fromage next to South Kensington for French cheeses, again you can have a cheese plate with some wine there if you like. They have a couple of branches elsewhere. Selfridges and Harrods have good cheese counters. Harrods food has shrunk a lot in recent years though.

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I'd say Lower Manhattan begins at Houston Street. But would accept Canal Street as an alternative.

shropshire blue at 2 o'clock and clockwise from there: wigmore, stilton, windrush and old winchester.   i had the old winchester and the stilton at the top, followed closely by the shropshire blue.

we'll probably be at borough market next monday and if so i'll try my best to stop by neal's yard.   by the way, paxton & whitfield also very patiently let you try as much as you want before you

One of my seminal cheese experiences was a Double Gloucester from P and W but that was a long time ago. I don't have much to add to the excellent recommendations above; it slightly depends where you are based. I like La Cave a Fromage next to South Kensington for French cheeses, again you can have a cheese plate with some wine there if you like. They have a couple of branches elsewhere. Selfridges and Harrods have good cheese counters. Harrods food has shrunk a lot in recent years though.

What are the tasting norms in Britain? eg, In France, samples are not ordinarily offered, but if you intend to buy a reasonable quantity of an expensive cheese you will be provided slivers of the examples for sale.

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here are this evening's purchases from paxton & whitfield:

 

old winchester (hard, pasteurized cow's milk from wiltshire))

shropshire blue

stilton

wigmore (semi-soft, unpasteurized ewe's milk)

windrush (goat's milk cheese from oxfordshire)

 

now to enjoy them with helicopters buzzing above our flat in westminster...

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to answer voyager's question: i was offered generous samples of everything i was interested in. if the kids had not been with (and going a bit out of their minds at that point) i'd have done broader sampling before purchasing but we're here almost another three months.

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....

 

old winchester (hard, pasteurized cow's milk from wiltshire))

shropshire blue

stilton

wigmore (semi-soft, unpasteurized ewe's milk)

windrush (goat's milk cheese from oxfordshire)

 

,,,,,our flat in westminster...

 

 

.... we're here almost another three months.

 

Sounds like the good life to me!

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Stichelton is in fact English. But internet research discloses that it was first made about 10 years ago. So it was probably A Thing then here and in other major centers because it was new.

 

I remember being served it excitedly at Ssam Bar, and then seeing it at hipster cheese stores.

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17426112_10154716655308303_4782979699602

 

 

shropshire blue at 2 o'clock and clockwise from there: wigmore, stilton, windrush and old winchester.

 

i had the old winchester and the stilton at the top, followed closely by the shropshire blue. the wigmore was a bit underwhelming after everything i'd read about it. the windrush was mild as goat cheeses go and was very good with the onion chutney. the old winchester was very good by itself (especially after being out for a couple of hours) and also (separately) with pears and sips of the glenfarclas 15 (a sherry cask matured malt). this picture was taken before everything came to temperature. the shropshire blue was more aggressive than the stilton on arrival, whereas the stilton seemed to get more pungent on the "finish".

 

a good start to my cheese eating adventure. the remains should take me through the end of the week. another five next week.

 

(also: it's not possible to use a veg peeler on cheese. our furnished flat's kitchen is not optimally furnished.)

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Beautiful pic and descriptions.

 

Thanks for posting today. Yesterday, I posted a question about your Winchester situation and if you were impacted by the day's events. But somehow, it appeared in the "Reasons to be Cheerful" thread and I took it down. So glad to hear you seem unaffected and that life goes on so well.

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another cheese pickup at paxton & whitfield today (very conveniently located between my "classroom" while i'm here and our flat).

 

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an excellent double gloucester up top and clockwise from there: pennard ridge (a semi-hard goat cheese), gorwydd caerphilly, a special reserve wensleydale and a big hunk of stichelton.

 

all good but the double gloucester and the caerphilly (actually made in somerset now) were my favourites tonight (and both were good with sherried and mildly peated whisky). the stichelton also very good---maybe a touch saltier than i would like (might actually be a bit past its prime--shouldn't have got such a big hunk).

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I always like La Fromagerie but for obscure british cheeses I'd think Neal's Yard is a better option.

 

 

Despite being in London, La Fromagerie has French cheeses that are as good as any you'll find in Paris. So if you want to branch out into French cheeses that would be the place to go.

 

The Neal's Yard stand at the Saturday Spa Terminus market is always fun. I agree that any of their locations would be the best places in London to buy British cheese. The cheese will be perfectly stored and aged - the Stichelton in more optimal condition and with the possibility of choosing between different wheels - and they are also big believers in patiently letting you try cheeses first before you purchase.

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