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NYC: A BBQ Paradise?


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The Wall Street Journal has a food section article about what they see as a paradise in BBQ. The rise of high quality pit masters, access to good meat, an abundance of affluent customers all contribute to a surge in new places. And, places celebrating fifth and tenth anniversaries.

 

 

The approach can be unabashedly traditional. At Hill Country Barbecue Market, the Flatiron District favorite that has expanded to include locations in Brooklyn and Washington, D.C., the focus is on classic Texas-style barbecue—with meats, including brisket, of course, ordered at a butcher-style counter and served on butcher paper.

 

The no-nonsense ideal certainly has its fans: The Flatiron location alone, which is marking its 10th anniversary with a series of events starting Tuesday, has seen its annual sales roughly double, according to Hill Country founder Marc Glosserman. He declined to provide specific sales figures.

 

In other instances, barbecue restaurants are going full-throttle gourmet. Consider Pig Bleecker in Greenwich Village, which opened at the beginning of this year. The restaurant, an offshoot of the Brooklyn barbecue establishment Pig Beach, features such dishes as brisket ravioli with black truffle butter and a smoked and grilled pork chop with peach habañero jam.

 

Pig Bleecker executive chef and partner Matt Abdoo doesn’t even refer to his place as a barbecue joint. Instead, he said it is a restaurant devoted to “smoke-centric comfort food.”

 

In NY, real estate is never far from the discussion. That, and $50 per person bbq dinners, which horrify the readers from NC, TX, etc.

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/move-over-texasn-y-is-rustling-up-some-top-notch-barbecue-1495717200?tesla=y

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I admit I don't get Que. We used to snag dinner from an authentic place in Oakland en route to the country on Friday nights. Off the charts fat, and served classically with white bread. To me, it was sweet. Meat flavor subordinated to sweet sauce. But then, I don't do sweet.

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That's only one style, using a sweet rub and/or sauce. Some regional styles use no sauce for cooking and only have it available on the side. Some go for tomatoey sauce (usually sweet, always ask for it on the side if possible); some for vinegar based; some even (gasp) mayonnaise based; some for no sauce at all. Some use complicated wet or dry brining; some not much more that S&P. If it's cooked low and slow, the fat should keep it moist (and any surface fat could be removed when you're eating). Please don't write it all off.

 

The barbecue place that just opened near me (not great, but better than others I've tried) says they do Memphis-style, which can be either dry or wet rubbed and cooked dry or with sauce; if they cook wet, it's not very sweet. Their brisket is more Texas-style, just S&P and dry. Pulled pork is served without sauce. Sauces on the table are all kind of tomatoey. One is just sweet; another version of the same sauce has jalapeño, and another has tamarind. (It's Memphis by way of Santo Domingo.) I like it best without any sauce, and it's moist enough to not need any. Their sliced bacon is brushed with soy sauce before the final cooking--go figure.

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I just had another good meal at hometown in red hook, which included a really nice texas style (no sauce) beef rib.

 

someone on here, I think it was joethefoodie, went on my recommendation and was unimpressed. where should I be going that's better?

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Welcome home!

 

That's a different place from the guy who won Brisket King this year, or the same?

 

Not home yet. I think it's the same guy.

 

I admit I don't get Que. We used to snag dinner from an authentic place in Oakland en route to the country on Friday nights. Off the charts fat, and served classically with white bread. To me, it was sweet. Meat flavor subordinated to sweet sauce. But then, I don't do sweet.

 

Everett & Jones? If so, I always thought it was great. There was also a location on 3rd St. near Candlestick that we'd hit up after games.

 

I just had another good meal at hometown in red hook, which included a really nice texas style (no sauce) beef rib.

 

someone on here, I think it was joethefoodie, went on my recommendation and was unimpressed. where should I be going that's better?

 

It was. But conversing with a friend 2 weeks ago who knows his 'cue, and he's had some great stuff there. I just got unlucky.

 

I really think 'cue is a timing thing.

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A lot of the very early reports at Hometown were mixed to negative. So maybe they had consistency problems early on, which they later fixed. Certainly, more recent reports are almost uniformly positive. (I'm ashamed to say that I've never been myself.)

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Getting into a good stride is critical. Especially if you're scaling up from a food truck, etc.

X

FWIW, I've found that being in any shop when the Q comes out is key. It rarely improves on a warming tray.

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  • 2 months later...

A lot of the very early reports at Hometown were mixed to negative. So maybe they had consistency problems early on, which they later fixed. Certainly, more recent reports are almost uniformly positive. (I'm ashamed to say that I've never been myself.)

 

We went. The beef rib was pretty good, nicely smokey and... err... "moist". Brisket wasn't as successful, and the bottom part was pretty dry. "Potato Salad" was a cup of fridge cold potato puree (and not an appealing version thereof), collards were fine. This is much better than Hill Country (for example) but still far from the Texas big league.

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A lot of the very early reports at Hometown were mixed to negative. So maybe they had consistency problems early on, which they later fixed. Certainly, more recent reports are almost uniformly positive. (I'm ashamed to say that I've never been myself.)

 

We went. The beef rib was pretty good, nicely smokey and... err... "moist". Brisket wasn't as successful, and the bottom part was pretty dry. "Potato Salad" was a cup of fridge cold potato puree (and not an appealing version thereof), collards were fine. This is much better than Hill Country (for example) but still far from the Texas big league.

 

This was pretty much how I felt (and ate) at Hometown. (the potato salad was a joke).

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