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Ethical Question - Maternity Leave and Job Change


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So... Things have been interesting! My wife has interviewed for a job in Geneva, Switzerland.IF things go the right way for the job, she would probably start in January so the kids can start school at the beginning of the spring semester. She is also 5+ months pregnant and is due just before Thanksgiving. This means that if all goes well with the job, she will take maternity leave and leave before it is over.

 

The better half is feeling a bit guilty taking the maternity leave with possibility of leaving for a new job before it is over.

 

What does the peanut gallery think? Is there a problem with this? What would you do?

 

 

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So... Things have been interesting! My wife has interviewed for a job in Geneva, Switzerland.IF things go the right way for the job, she would probably start in January so the kids can start school at

I have several friends who did this - you have to do what's right for you. I was actually recruited fairly aggressively for another position while I was on maternity leave and I gave it considerable t

There is no inherent moral dimension here. It's only business.

I have several friends who did this - you have to do what's right for you. I was actually recruited fairly aggressively for another position while I was on maternity leave and I gave it considerable thought. In my case, it wasn't the right move but for the right job I would have done it.

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Congratulations on the new arrival, sounds like you have a lot on your plate.

 

Does the medical coverage change if she accepts the job in Switzerland? Are there limits on how a difficult pregnancy or infant care would be handled? Is that in the relocation package?

 

I've had employees take another job while on maternal leave. It's not a desirable event for planning purposes, but you live. In NJ, an employee doesn't have to repay the ten weeks comp we offered.

 

(I'd say GO FOR IT!)

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Echo Sneak. I also am a firm believer of 'what goes around comes around'. Going beyond the short term or immediate personal benefits, I worry about the overall effect on business's attitude toward these crucial leaves. The attitude of "well, she's long gone." And often "she" is.

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FWIW, the European view:

1. Nobody goes back to work in two months. When I took 4 it was considered crazy, and when I took six it was considered very employer friendly. Most women I know took a year.

2. Minimum notice period is anywhere between 3 to 9 months ( usually at least 6 for a senior role)

3. Health care covered always, one way or another. in any case the state by default, private as an option if you can afford it.

Will be a great experience for the kids, and as Bonner says, it needs to be seen as an accrued benefit. Congrats on both pieces of news!

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The problem with being above-board is that you've accrued the time (and it also matters vis-a-vis health insurance) but your employer can do all sorts of bad things. Frankly I don't know enough about DanM's wife's employer, but I would recommend she speak with an employment lawyer before she tells them in advance she's resigning during maternity leave.

 

Frankly its easy for a bunch of dudes to speculate on this, but the evidence is on average you are better off playing to close to your chest.

 

Woman take maternity leave and don't come back to work all the time. Sure normally its to stay home with the kids, but really does it matter to the employer?

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Echo Sneak. I also am a firm believer of 'what goes around comes around'. Going beyond the short term or immediate personal benefits, I worry about the overall effect on business's attitude toward these crucial leaves. The attitude of "well, she's long gone." And often "she" is.

The employer who is going to be pissed off at this is mostly the same employer who is giving woman leave equivalent to the legal minimum.

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Echo Sneak. I also am a firm believer of 'what goes around comes around'. Going beyond the short term or immediate personal benefits, I worry about the overall effect on business's attitude toward these crucial leaves. The attitude of "well, she's long gone." And often "she" is.

The employer who is going to be pissed off at this is mostly the same employer who is giving woman leave equivalent to the legal minimum.

 

 

In my former company, we found that doing much more than the legal minimum allowed us to retain some good employees, even when they had other opportunities. The maternity benefit was among the first things chopped when we were purchased by a much bigger firm.

 

Agree with the suggestion that an employment / benefits lawyer be contacted. With the international move, I'd want to assure a continuity of coverage for the newborn and mom.

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