Jump to content

Ethical Question - Maternity Leave and Job Change


Recommended Posts

There is no inherent moral dimension here. It's only business.

 

 

I guess the optics may not be great. But that's a practical concern, not a moral one.

 

Both true: nowadays apparently morality has no place in business. Venality is all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 33
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

So... Things have been interesting! My wife has interviewed for a job in Geneva, Switzerland.IF things go the right way for the job, she would probably start in January so the kids can start school at

I have several friends who did this - you have to do what's right for you. I was actually recruited fairly aggressively for another position while I was on maternity leave and I gave it considerable t

There is no inherent moral dimension here. It's only business.

There is no inherent moral dimension here. It's only business.

Basically, I can't disagree with your assessment of how the business world usually views this. But I'd add that I think that this is a problem and not something to be passively accepted. In other words, I think that there is an "inherent moral dimension" that is not exercised much in our society & that is generally accepted. That's our bad.

 

I think in business it's best to be totally above-board at all times.

 

A nice thought, but not to be operationalized in our current world. See above. And below.

 

Maternity leave is an accrued benefit. I would not be too concerned about this. I mean it's not great but it's fine.

 

(Geneva? I hope it's a big job)

 

I fully agree.

 

The problem with being above-board is that you've accrued the time (and it also matters vis-a-vis health insurance) but your employer can do all sorts of bad things. Frankly I don't know enough about DanM's wife's employer, but I would recommend she speak with an employment lawyer before she tells them in advance she's resigning during maternity leave.

 

Frankly its easy for a bunch of dudes to speculate on this, but the evidence is on average you are better off playing to close to your chest.

 

 

And this is exactly why I agree. No one plays poker with an open hand and, if they do, they are decreasing the odds of winning since everyone else uses the gained knowledge to their advantage and plays their closed cards accordingly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's very important to go over the employee agreement.

 

For example, in Canada (not where DanM's wife is), the legal minimum salary is covered by employment insurance (60% of your salary, I think), but some workplaces top up so the person on pat leave (this applies to both mothers and fathers who take leave) can get close to 100% of their salary for up to one year. The federal government tops up (so your total is 93%), and they say:

you must sign an agreement stating that you will return to work on the expiry of your maternity or parental leave without pay and will work for a period equal to the period you will be in receipt of the maternity or parental allowance

 

and

Should you fail to return to work, or should you return to work but fail to work for the total period specified in your agreement, you will be required to repay the allowance or portion of the allowance. Refer to the relevant authorities such as your collective agreement and/or the various terms and conditions of employment specific to your classification group for details of the calculations.

 

 

But if I'm going on mat leave and am planning on not returning, I can refuse the top up and just get the legally mandated EI payments. And there's nothing the employer can do about my not returning.

 

So what does her employee agreement say (if anything)?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Basically, I can't disagree with your assessment of how the business world usually views this. But I'd add that I think that this is a problem and not something to be passively accepted. In other words, I think that there is an "inherent moral dimension" that is not exercised much in our society & that is generally accepted. That's our bad.

 

I fully agree that it's Bad that we've removed the moral dimension from something so critical to human flourishing as work. I think in some sense the problems go back to Enlightenment concepts around individual liberty, and really it's all the fault of William of Ockham and nominalism...

 

But, yeah, there's just nothing you can do about it as a private individual in the context of your personal employment situation. \:

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no inherent moral dimension here. It's only business.

 

 

I think in business it's best to be totally above-board at all times.

 

But I'm a loser.

 

Morality is always important in business. Nobody will want to work with or for you if you have reputation of lying, cheating, or stealing.

 

Maternity leave is an accrued benefit. I would not be too concerned about this. I mean it's not great but it's fine.

 

(Geneva? I hope it's a big job)

 

I totally agree with this. I have felt that the maternity leave is earned and not just a right.

 

The issue here is it right to inform them that Maternity leave (6-8 weeks for disability and up to 6 weeks for parental leave) starts on x date, collect full pay and benefits, and then inform them ahead of time that you will not be returning once it is over.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the cold clear light of noon, I end up agreeing with taion and Bonner. And, in answer to Dan's final question, I think it is fair to do that.

 

What's she supposed to do? Not take the better job if it's offered? Not look for new jobs when she's pregnant? That CAN'T be right.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

DanM said:

 

Morality is always important in business.

 

 

Dan, so true! A person's reputation precedes him wherever he ends up.

 

Your plans might change so it's probably wise to wait until you are absolutely sure...thus good reasoning for not speaking up too soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...