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Met Museum NY to institute mandatory admission fee


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The "pay what you can" policy is coming to an end, and a tiered structure will replace it on March 1. Residents of NY City and State will still be allowed to pay what they can, but will be challenged for address ID. The NY Times says only 17% of visitors pay the full requested amount.

 

The fee is, in part, the result of a diminished contribution from the city, which owns the building and assists with security. The city has committed to increasing assistance to cultural institutions for underserved populations, the article says. So, less money for the Met.

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/04/arts/design/met-museum-admissions.html?_r=0

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The article mentions that their construction projects have gone way over budget, and they have a significant cost for security which the city has previously offset.

 

I don't have a good sense of where the Met's donation support tiers are. It wouldn't surprise me if they suffer some membership erosion with the new tax rules on donations.

 

Still, it's nice that they don't charge extra for special exhibitions.

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I think it's fine to charge something, but $25 would have been prohibitively expensive for me as a recent graduate, and probably much too expensive for many families/young people visiting NY. Which is a real shame as it is the one museum in NY I find truly essential in terms of scope and quality, and now many people will never have the chance to make that discovery. Or possibly worse, feel they have to get their money's worth by grimly spending a full day there, an easy way to convince yourself that you don't like museums.

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You people have just been spoiled for a long time.

 

San Francisco's puny De Young/Legion of Honor combine charges $26 Tuesdays through Friday, $29 weekends and holidays. A membership starts at $119 which allows two people, a no-brainer if you plan several visits.

 

Membership at the Met starts at $100, same benefits as De Young, and only $80. if you live outside the area (100 miles).

 

If you visit a city regularly, a membership often is a good investment, also at least partially tax deductible and cafe/gift ship discounts.

 

(I remember the old days when the Met gave out colored admission buttons that you were supposed to drop in a container at the door when you left. But many people discarded them on the sidewalk after exiting. And others scanned the sidewalks and scooped them up before entering.)

 

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Spoiled is an interesting choice of word. I guess I've just been out of the US too long. Most expensive Pinakothek entry is 10 EUR (the collections are not exactly shabby...) British Museum is still free -- suggested donation 5 GBP, and the Prado and Louvre (I just checked) are respectively 15 and 9 EUR.

 

You can argue that European states are using taxpayer money to fund elite activities. But in Europe it is seen more like school funding, in that it is making quality education and access to "high culture" reference points available to everybody regardless of background, which makes for more social cohesiveness, social mobililty, and common frames of reference. (God knows there are enough other barriers to achieving this.) US institutions -- at least in their fundraising literature -- present themselves the same way.

 

The Met clearly benchmarked their pricing based on other NY or even US institutions, but maybe there should also be a larger discussion of what a reasonable admission price is, given the stated goals of the institutions themselves.

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The Met clearly benchmarked their pricing based on other NY or even US institutions, but maybe there should also be a larger discussion of what a reasonable admission price is, given the stated goals of the institutions themselves.

Maybe the Met benchmarked their pricing based on what it costs to see a shitty movie, the Knicks, the Nets, the Mets, the Botanical Gardens, or any of dozens of other NYC institutions which don't provide anywhere near the breathtaking scope of stuff to see that's not available to see anywhere else on the planet?

 

I hardly think the new policy is heinous:

 

With this update, our pay-as-you-wish policy will continue for New York State residents and students from across the tristate region, while visitors from outside New York will be required to pay mandatory admissions; admission for children under 12 will remain free. The Museum will also now honor full-priced admissions tickets for three consecutive days, giving all visitors more time to experience each of The Met's three locations. We anticipate that the mandatory admissions component will affect approximately 31 percent of our annual visitors.

 

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Not sure what your point is. Major league sports tickets are clearly a luxury good. I guess you think museums are also a luxury good, whereas much of the rest of the world thinks they shouldn't be.

 

The three-day admission is at least a mitigating factor.

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The Met clearly benchmarked their pricing based on other NY or even US institutions, but maybe there should also be a larger discussion of what a reasonable admission price is, given the stated goals of the institutions themselves.

Maybe the Met benchmarked their pricing based on what it costs to see a shitty movie, the Knicks, the Nets, the Mets, the Botanical Gardens, or any of dozens of other NYC institutions which don't provide anywhere near the breathtaking scope of stuff to see that's not available to see anywhere else on the planet?

 

I hardly think the new policy is heinous:

 

With this update, our pay-as-you-wish policy will continue for New York State residents and students from across the tristate region, while visitors from outside New York will be required to pay mandatory admissions; admission for children under 12 will remain free. The Museum will also now honor full-priced admissions tickets for three consecutive days, giving all visitors more time to experience each of The Met's three locations. We anticipate that the mandatory admissions component will affect approximately 31 percent of our annual visitors.

 

 

These options sound reasonable to me. Pay-as-you-wish remains the same for a broad segment of locals, children have access to the museum, visitors don't feel the need to stay until visual and intellectual burn out. I wish our major museums (De Young, Moma and Asian Art) were as liberal.

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Not sure what your point is. Major league sports tickets are clearly a luxury good. I guess you think museums are also a luxury good, whereas much of the rest of the world thinks they shouldn't be.

 

The three-day admission is at least a mitigating factor.

Well then, compare it to what it costs in Manhattan to go to the theatre, opera, classical music concerts, etc. Are those considered luxury goods also?

 

Because if so, then I guess seeing the Michelangelo show currently at the Met, ought to be considered a luxury good as well.

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Not sure what your point is. Major league sports tickets are clearly a luxury good. I guess you think museums are also a luxury good, whereas much of the rest of the world thinks they shouldn't be.

 

The three-day admission is at least a mitigating factor.

Well then, compare it to what it costs in Manhattan to go to the theatre, opera, classical music concerts, etc. Are those considered luxury goods also?

 

Because if so, then I guess seeing the Michelangelo show currently at the Met, ought to be considered a luxury good as well.

 

 

Opera at the Met, sure, but that's not the only place to see it. Even less the case for general classical music. (In Europe you can still hear a lot of it in churches.)

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Not sure what your point is. Major league sports tickets are clearly a luxury good. I guess you think museums are also a luxury good, whereas much of the rest of the world thinks they shouldn't be.

 

The three-day admission is at least a mitigating factor.

Well then, compare it to what it costs in Manhattan to go to the theatre, opera, classical music concerts, etc. Are those considered luxury goods also?

 

Because if so, then I guess seeing the Michelangelo show currently at the Met, ought to be considered a luxury good as well.

 

 

Opera at the Met, sure, but that's not the only place to see it. Even less the case for general classical music. (In Europe you can still hear a lot of it in Churches.)

 

 

I would in fact bet that the Germany audience -- and it is a quite knowledgeable audience -- for classical music is far broader than in the US, simply because it is easy to get regular exposure from an early age outside of expensive ticketed events.

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