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Eater's 30 Iconic NYC Restaurant Dishes

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I tend to think of veal chops as boring and totally dependent on its sauce treatment.

 

Unless the iconic listing cites the sauce treatment, then I'm surprised a veal chop would be considered iconic.

It does, if you click the link.

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From that perspective, the SF list is just weird and seems to reflect a pre-tech money list. No gibralter/cortado at Blue Bottle? Two ice creams but not Humphrey Slocomb's "secret breakfast"? No torta at Torta Gorda? No tiki cocktails? No fine dining dishes (mock-shark fin soup at Benu)? State bird at State Bird (which is actually kind of a mediocre dish)? Their list strongly deviates from the "quintessentially San Francisco" tourist foodie itinerary in a way the NYC list doesn't.

"Quintessentially San Francisco" and "tourist foodie itinerary" are hardly synonyms, nor is much post-tech money food truly iconic. Iconic traditionally has meant something that has withstood the test of time. Audrey Hepburn is iconic; Katy Perry not likely.

Something can't be iconic if only locals have heard of it. You'll get a lot more traction with people who live in the world with secret breakfast or the gibraltar than the rebel within or the cruffin.

 

No one has ever said "you're going to San Francisco? you gotta get the hangtown fry and have a martini at aub zam zam" in history, not once, ever, the way they've said "you gotta go to Katz's/El Farolito/eat a bread bowl/get the carbone veal chop" etc.

Precisely. (p.s. blue bottle is well and truly dead)

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I've had some of these more than once, but honestly if you're not chasing icons you are going to change it up. I've eaten things at Shack Shake, Gray's, Minetta's, Veselka's, Russ & Ds, Keen's...and so on, other than The Dish.

 

Obviously I've eaten the Katz sandwich more often than anything else.

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I tend to think of veal chops as boring and totally dependent on its sauce treatment.

 

A well sourced and seasoned and seared thick medium rare veal chop au nature has long been one of my favorite foods. I only enjoy it at home when I can control these factors. Sauce, never! I love the clean flavor. Sadly, it's not on my rotation since husband doesn't eat veal and I seldom cook just for myself. And sadly, it is not a dish I trust to a restaurant kitchen.

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Favored restaurateurs here (including Robert Del Grande) have said a number of times they much prefer the parts of the animal that get exercised. The veal chop would not qualify. It lacks the texture and flavor that more active cuts have.

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From that perspective, the SF list is just weird and seems to reflect a pre-tech money list. No gibralter/cortado at Blue Bottle? Two ice creams but not Humphrey Slocomb's "secret breakfast"? No torta at Torta Gorda? No tiki cocktails? No fine dining dishes (mock-shark fin soup at Benu)? State bird at State Bird (which is actually kind of a mediocre dish)? Their list strongly deviates from the "quintessentially San Francisco" tourist foodie itinerary in a way the NYC list doesn't.

"Quintessentially San Francisco" and "tourist foodie itinerary" are hardly synonyms, nor is much post-tech money food truly iconic. Iconic traditionally has meant something that has withstood the test of time. Audrey Hepburn is iconic; Katy Perry not likely.

 

 

Something can't be iconic if only locals have heard of it. You'll get a lot more traction with people who live in the world with secret breakfast or the gibraltar than the rebel within or the cruffin.

 

 

 

Got it. We're coming at this from different angles. You from a commercial "what sells" or tourist rec, eg your words, "No one has ever said "you're going to San Francisco? you gotta get the..." We try to avoid just that, traveling with the hope of visiting places where locals introduce us to esoteric specialties that are inbred in their lives, i.e., iconic to the region.

 

At home, jostling with ancient North Beach mamas for the last raisin focaccio; or just off the boaters on Clement Street for the remaining scallop dim sum; seeing that our burrito haunt is serving more Hispanics on their lunch break than Anglos; remembering that we had our first Irish Coffee around 2am almost 50 years ago at Yerba Buena where we frequently ended the evening.

 

We try to stay ahead of what is being touted by Food and Wine, or the hotel concierge desk, try to insinuate ourselves as regulars before the hip press deems someplace "iconic".

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Favored restaurateurs here (including Robert Del Grande) have said a number of times they much prefer the parts of the animal that get exercised. The veal chop would not qualify. It lacks the texture and flavor that more active cuts have.

Actually my favorite cuts of veal are pancreas and a thick chunk of liver, both well used but hardly exercised. As I wrote, never trust a restaurant. ;)

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I've had some of these more than once, but honestly if you're not chasing icons you are going to change it up. I've eaten things at Shack Shake, Gray's, Minetta's, Veselka's, Russ & Ds, Keen's...and so on, other than The Dish.

Obviously I've eaten the Katz sandwich more often than anything else.

For me, not about chasing icons, just going back to places/foods I love eating. I grew up on DiFara’s pizza, had many late nights at Katz’s & Veselka’s in the late ‘60s (& still go), had many friends with Luger’s credit cards, had (or shared) the lamb noodles at Xi’an since their 1st stall in Golden Mall, and pretty much consider Keen’s my favorite NYC steakhouse.

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Ive had eleven of these,and the falafel at Mamouns is the only one that I have et more than once...and there is much better falafel around now,anyhoo... Love Liguria focaccia and Swan Oyster Depot,and Tartine bread in SF,and have enjoyed all more than once...

As a teenager we use to spend our weekend drinking 40s and playing chess in between Washington square and chess forum and other chess place. I dont remember eating that much but, we we did, it was Mamouns. I guess I have eaten there maybe a 100 times between ages 17 and 21.

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From that perspective, the SF list is just weird and seems to reflect a pre-tech money list. No gibralter/cortado at Blue Bottle? Two ice creams but not Humphrey Slocomb's "secret breakfast"? No torta at Torta Gorda? No tiki cocktails? No fine dining dishes (mock-shark fin soup at Benu)? State bird at State Bird (which is actually kind of a mediocre dish)? Their list strongly deviates from the "quintessentially San Francisco" tourist foodie itinerary in a way the NYC list doesn't.

"Quintessentially San Francisco" and "tourist foodie itinerary" are hardly synonyms, nor is much post-tech money food truly iconic. Iconic traditionally has meant something that has withstood the test of time. Audrey Hepburn is iconic; Katy Perry not likely.

Something can't be iconic if only locals have heard of it. You'll get a lot more traction with people who live in the world with secret breakfast or the gibraltar than the rebel within or the cruffin.

 

No one has ever said "you're going to San Francisco? you gotta get the hangtown fry and have a martini at aub zam zam" in history, not once, ever, the way they've said "you gotta go to Katz's/El Farolito/eat a bread bowl/get the carbone veal chop" etc.

Precisely. (p.s. blue bottle is well and truly dead)

 

I'd sooner slit my wrists than tell someone coming to NYC to get the veal chop at Carbone.

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Anyone eat a bread bowl in SF more than once.

I'm still digesting mine, and I think it was in ordered in the early 80s.

 

Is there (because I sometimes have trouble figuring out what people mean in their posts, and they take too long to reread) really an argument as to whether the Irish Coffee at the BV is iconic or not?

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The argument is that the nyc list is pretty good and that the SF list contains a handful of true icons, and then some local favourites and bizarre choices but ignores some obvious icons (in particular newer icons) of San Francisco food scene and is, therefore, a bad list.

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The argument is that the nyc list is pretty good and that the SF list contains a handful of true icons, and then some local favourites and bizarre choices but ignores some obvious icons (in particular newer icons) of San Francisco food scene and is, therefore, a bad list.

You see, you could've been my philosophy teacher in college, had I taken any philosophy.

 

And I agree, though I'm glad they included some drinks on the SF list. (Why they left off Dungeness crab and sand dabs is beyond me, though I do see they were mentioned at Swan and Tadich).

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From that perspective, the SF list is just weird and seems to reflect a pre-tech money list. No gibralter/cortado at Blue Bottle? Two ice creams but not Humphrey Slocomb's "secret breakfast"? No torta at Torta Gorda? No tiki cocktails? No fine dining dishes (mock-shark fin soup at Benu)? State bird at State Bird (which is actually kind of a mediocre dish)? Their list strongly deviates from the "quintessentially San Francisco" tourist foodie itinerary in a way the NYC list doesn't.

"Quintessentially San Francisco" and "tourist foodie itinerary" are hardly synonyms, nor is much post-tech money food truly iconic. Iconic traditionally has meant something that has withstood the test of time. Audrey Hepburn is iconic; Katy Perry not likely.

Something can't be iconic if only locals have heard of it. You'll get a lot more traction with people who live in the world with secret breakfast or the gibraltar than the rebel within or the cruffin.

 

No one has ever said "you're going to San Francisco? you gotta get the hangtown fry and have a martini at aub zam zam" in history, not once, ever, the way they've said "you gotta go to Katz's/El Farolito/eat a bread bowl/get the carbone veal chop" etc.

Precisely. (p.s. blue bottle is well and truly dead)

I'd sooner slit my wrists than tell someone coming to NYC to get the veal chop at Carbone.

Id tell them to get the veal parm before the 25

Dollar per piece shrimp. The further away I am from Carbone and the sea of shit meals Ive had since then,

Makes me nostalgic for the place. I also was with such good company that I look back loving the evening. I would recommend someone from out of town go here

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