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The side conversation in the "patty melt" thread caused me to think about crumpets. Several years ago when the first grand-sprog was an infant, I used to do a weekly "Breakfast Club" at my son's house. The menu varied, but the drill was that I'd arrive just before they got up, start breakfast and have it set up when they came downstairs. Crumpets were a favorite and a regular on the rotation.

 

I'd start the batter at home and add the final soda mixture just before leaving. The batter was ready by the time I arrived across town. This recipe is simple and guaranteed to work. CAVEAT: the crumpet rings must be re-greased for each batch. If you are buying rings, definitely get non-stick or silicon.

Otherwise, enjoy. It's time for me to dust off the recipe for this perfect winter treat.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2013/mar/21/how-to-cook-perfect-crumpets

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I've never had a home-made crumpet, not even in the old country, but they are indeed superior to "English" muffins. A little sourness in the flavor, genius design (okay, like waffles) for harboring cheese or butter or syrup or whatever.

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The crumpets in the picture in the link that Voyager offers are alarmingly orange.

Are they toasted? (With cheddar sprinkles?)

 

My mother made crumpets occasionally, and I inherited her recipe. It worked

for us flawlessly for 30 years, but we've recently mislaid it. (When you're young

and second-homeless all your stuff is in one place -- then your circumstances

improve and, by-dog, your life worsens in some respects: you cannot find

nothing no more.)

 

We made crumpets recently off an internet recipe, but they were a bit gluey.

I have to understand this "strong flour" code in V's link.

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The crumpets in the picture in the link that Voyager offers are alarmingly orange.

Are they toasted? (With cheddar sprinkles?)

 

My mother made crumpets occasionally, and I inherited her recipe. It worked

for us flawlessly for 30 years, but we've recently mislaid it. (When you're young

and second-homeless all your stuff is in one place -- then your circumstances

improve and, by-dog, your life worsens in some respects: you cannot find

nothing no more.)

 

We made crumpets recently off an internet recipe, but they were a bit gluey.

I have to understand this "strong flour" code in V's link.

Strong flour most likely refers to a high-protein flour; you can use bread flour in the US, as it has a higher protein content than all-purpose flour.

 

Here's a nice guide from King Arthur Flour.

 

And here.

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I don't think it is referring to strong protein. Rather strong gluten. I've seen references to "strong flour" in dim sum recipes, purpose is similar to what we use for spätzle, strudel, and pasta doughs -- I think its basically flour made with some proportion of very fine semolina (aka durum or hard wheat).

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strong flour in this context is higher protein flour. however UK plain flour is usually lower protein content than US AP flour and in the case of crumpets I suspect AP flour will be fine. But I might be wrong. If i had bread flour I'd probably use it, but I wouldn't go out to buy it the first time I make these.

 

https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/gb/groceries/sainsburys-strong-white-bread-flour--unbleached-15kg?langId=44&storeId=10151&krypto=LK2aAzle9AfMLpym0ByVL%2BRlavQrltIzKywg%2BTpFkk2QnqspiDH4%2BEPAuq6gyc0IPHSUxV02W68BU8yZKFwav%2BGCcQgM3nA2c2jbmp%2BhtNoOwllQk%2Bp%2F8dFRN22fcYv%2BefKi8VpswgwK5O7n7c50HVJ88FwcGgqk9lZZAGyInPM%3D&ddkey=https%3Agb%2Fgroceries%2Fsainsburys-strong-white-bread-flour--unbleached-15kg

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strong flour in this context is higher protein flour. however UK plain flour is usually lower protein content than US AP flour and in the case of crumpets I suspect AP flour will be fine. But I might be wrong. If i had bread flour I'd probably use it, but I wouldn't go out to buy it the first time I make these.

right = or even a 50/50 mix of a/p & bread. Both easy enough to find.

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I don't think it is referring to strong protein. Rather strong gluten. I've seen references to "strong flour" in dim sum recipes, purpose is similar to what we use for spätzle, strudel, and pasta doughs -- I think its basically flour made with some proportion of very fine semolina (aka durum or hard wheat).

 

gluten is protein.

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The crumpets in the picture in the link that Voyager offers are alarmingly orange.

Are they toasted? (With cheddar sprinkles?)

 

.....

 

We made crumpets recently off an internet recipe, but they were a bit gluey.

I have to understand this "strong flour" code in V's link.

 

 

 

Be assured that the actual result looks nothing like that scary linked photo,

 

I have always used regular unbleached flour (KA or Trader Joe) or bread flour if I have it on hand, But really nothing special.

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I don't think it is referring to strong protein. Rather strong gluten. I've seen references to "strong flour" in dim sum recipes, purpose is similar to what we use for spätzle, strudel, and pasta doughs -- I think its basically flour made with some proportion of very fine semolina (aka durum or hard wheat).

gluten is protein.

But not all protein is gluten.

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Anyway, doing a little online reading it looks like "strong flour" in this case is just compensating for UK flour containing softer wheat than US flour. Looks like you could even just use unbleached AP flour in the US. German recipes call for half 450 flour and half 550 flour.

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I don't think it is referring to strong protein. Rather strong gluten. I've seen references to "strong flour" in dim sum recipes, purpose is similar to what we use for spätzle, strudel, and pasta doughs -- I think its basically flour made with some proportion of very fine semolina (aka durum or hard wheat).

gluten is protein.

But not all protein is gluten.

 

 

 

True indeed, i.e. soy can make a high protein flour. but gluten itself does not exist in flour, it is a product of the combination of proteins when mixed with water. high protein flours will develop more gluten.

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I don't think it is referring to strong protein. Rather strong gluten. I've seen references to "strong flour" in dim sum recipes, purpose is similar to what we use for spätzle, strudel, and pasta doughs -- I think its basically flour made with some proportion of very fine semolina (aka durum or hard wheat).

gluten is protein.

But not all protein is gluten.

 

 

Therefore, all protein is Socrates.

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