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Mikkeller Brewery at Citi Field


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From Grubstreet -

 

Why New York Beer Geeks Are So Excited About a New Brewery Inside Citi Field

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For the kind of beer lovers who freak out over Imperial Stouts and New England–style IPAs, there aren’t many names bigger than Mikkeller. Over the last 12 years, founder Mikkel Borg Bjergso has established his Danish brand as a trendsetter (it was early to the gypsy-brewer scene) and, arguably, one of the world’s best brewers. Bjergso has made his name by taking aspects of modern craft beer (the big, sometimes weird flavors; limited-run creations) and pushing them to their least logical extremes. As a result, Mikkeller expanded from Denmark to Thailand, with breweries in Copenhagen, San Diego, and now New York. This past weekend, Mikkeller’s first East Coast outpost opened in Queens, at Citi Field, and — to those people who love heft stouts and juicy IPAs — it’s a very big deal. Here’s why beer geeks in New York and beyond are so excited for this opening.

1. The new brewery will be a hub for Mikkeller’s restless innovation. Mikkeller produces a lot of different types of beer. The New York Times once reported that Mikkeller produced 124 different beers in 2013 alone, and today, the website RateBeer currently lists 1,062 different beers and barley wines in the brewery’s profile. Even the most dedicated Mikkeller superfan would never be able to track down everything, but with the new brewery, that superfan at least has a destination where they can go and basically always find something new to try.

2. Mikkeller’s beers push craft beer’s big flavors to the extreme. One reason Mikkeller makes so many different beers is that the brewery is willing to try things nobody else will: Among Mikkeller’s many experiments are the so-called 1000 IBU; the Beer Geek series of flavored stouts like the Vanilla Raspberry Smoothie; and the Whenever Pilsner brewed with lime leaf, lemongrass, and ginger. Bjergso also goes all-in in collaborations (like with David Lynch) and small-batch beers, reportedly once purchasing $8,000 in truffles for a beer. (Not everything is so extreme, though. The Say Hey Sally, produced for the Mets, is a Czech-style pilsner.)

 

Full article here.

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Actually inside the stadium?

 

Good point.

 

A few comments.

 

In spite of the title of that article, the bar isn't actually inside Citi Field in the commonly accepted sense. You can only enter the bar from the outside. Once you show your tickets and enter the ballpark you can't return to the bar until the game is over and/or you leave the ballpark. Anyone watching the game in person is not going to be able to order a couple of Mikkeller beers while the game is underway.

 

The bar will be in "competition" with McFadden's, a large sports bar with a similar inside/outside location. I put that in quotes because I think they'll be catering to a customer base that's completely different. Most of the McFadden's crowd drinks Budweiser. About 20% drink Brooklyn lager or something similar. I think the Mikkeller brewery isn't going to siphon those people away. They'll depend on a different customer base. FWIW McFadden's is packed before games.

 

I am not sure if the business model is sound. The brewery will be large and I'm not sure there will be enough customers to sustain it in the long term. This issue will be compounded because Citi Field is in an isolated location. The nearest residential area is about a mile and a half away and is blue collar Hispanic. When the Mets aren't playing the area is pretty deserted. Foot traffic is non existent. (The Citi Field parking lot is used by commuters who park their cars and take the 7 train to Manhattan. They may get some customers who are picking up their cars at the end of the working day.)

 

McFadden's does a booming business before games but they close during the winter. I'm not even sure whether they're open when the Mets are on the road. I think their revenue stream is sufficient to sustain them but I'm not sure Mikkeller will draw the same large crowds as they do.

 

I wish Mikeller well but I wonder if they should have opened someplace else.

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I think a lot of the people in the brooklyn brewpubs have driven in from outside the city and if they do regular can releases like everyone else theyll get enough of that crowd to be fine.

 

Parking at Citi Field is $25. That may be a deterrent. It is to me - I park in Flushing and take the train one stop to the ballpark.

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I think a lot of the people in the brooklyn brewpubs have driven in from outside the city and if they do regular can releases like everyone else theyll get enough of that crowd to be fine.

Parking at Citi Field is $25. That may be a deterrent. It is to me - I park in Flushing and take the train one stop to the ballpark.

 

 

ETA - From the website:

 

Parking is available in Lot G on non-Citi Field event or game days. Please alert parking attendant you are visiting Mikkeller NYC brewery.

 

Looks like there's free or discounted parking on non game days.

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