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Ugh. But Shula’s in Orlando wasn’t even busy, just didn’t care I guess.

 

I should say, these weren’t issues about the steaks being cooked to order, just bad meat.

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Since the thread is ostensibly about best meals, one of ours was an evening in Provincetown, where we were cooked for by locals. With local stuff.   Scallops, barely cooked.  Razor clams, uncooked,

In the same vein - two big beautiful conch just out of water (planned to go spear fishing but had a spear gun malfunction), with simple yucatan ceviche marinade (tomato, onion, lime juice, salt, peppe

It does.   So I started this thread forgetting that, absent the Pink Pig, I need to look at my actual diary for this year’s meals, but I will get around to it.

Yikes @Wilf. 

 

I've had 3 meals at 3 different Shula's (not by choice). One in AL, the original and one in Orlando. They were all poor. The "original" was the best of the bunch. But I was with a well known athlete at the time. So who knows what it would have been like otherwise.

 

Agree about Bern's. 

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My best dish, if you can even call it that, was revelatory: Tortillitas de camarones in a nondescript bar in Seville.  Not a day has passed that I haven't thought about that tapa.  I bought chickpea flour to make something that resembled what I ate in Spain, but somehow my attempts have resulted in the invention of shrimp latkes -- not bad, actually.

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Best dish was probably the grilled turbot at Brat. I've tried to imitate it a number of times at home (with all the accoutrements - an asador style grill, a turbot clamp, a version of "agua de Lourdes") with limited success to date.  Much easier to get close to replicating is their other signature dish "burnt" Basque cheesecake.  Both dishes "inspired" by Basque classics of course.

 

Second is probably some grilled Iberico presa with jollof rice at Ikoyi.  I really want to go back there soon.

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If we're going to discuss best dishes of the year, then I have two (with two honorable mentions):

 

1. Gruyere Fritters at Crown Shy

2. Calamari & Scungili Fra Diavolo at Park Side

 

HM1 - Bone Soup at Wu's

HM2 - Rabbit Loin app at River Cafe

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I had forgotten about my meal at River Cafe in the Autumn. The pigeon marinated in Amarone with porcini on toast was particularly good.  And we drank some excellent Cepparello.  Probably should have come in at no.6 on my list.  So consistent, remains one of my favourite restaurants.

 

Another Italian I forgot about is Emilia, in the old Bonham's space, by the team behind The Portland, Clipstone etc.  I've been three times and it's maybe the best Italian in central London.  It also has an excellent (if somewhat erratically priced) wine-list.  Their "auction list" varies from retail prices to normal restaurant mark-up.  On our last visit (during white truffle season) we drank a Giorgio Primo 2011 for £85 I think.  It's not Bonham's (which is missed) but a good spot nonetheless.

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If we're going to discuss best dishes of the year, then I have two (with two honorable mentions):

 

1. Gruyere Fritters at Crown Shy

2. Calamari & Scungili Fra Diavolo at Park Side

 

HM1 - Bone Soup at Wu's

HM2 - Rabbit Loin app at River Cafe

 

I just had (for about the 100th time) your HM1 yesterday for lunch. 

 

Sadly, our order of gruyere fritters at Crown Shy was terrible.

 

My guess, IanT, is that you're talking about 2 different rivers.

 

I had forgotten about my meal at River Cafe in the Autumn. The pigeon marinated in Amarone with porcini on toast was particularly good.  And we drank some excellent Cepparello.  

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My best dish, if you can even call it that, was revelatory: Tortillitas de camarones in a nondescript bar in Seville.  Not a day has passed that I haven't thought about that tapa.  I bought chickpea flour to make something that resembled what I ate in Spain, but somehow my attempts have resulted in the invention of shrimp latkes -- not bad, actually.

Lippy, is this anything close?    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h75BHEqyPR4

Or do you want to share your fabulous sounding shrimp latkes?   

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My best dish, if you can even call it that, was revelatory: Tortillitas de camarones in a nondescript bar in Seville.  Not a day has passed that I haven't thought about that tapa.  I bought chickpea flour to make something that resembled what I ate in Spain, but somehow my attempts have resulted in the invention of shrimp latkes -- not bad, actually.

Lippy, is this anything close?    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h75BHEqyPR4

Or do you want to share your fabulous sounding shrimp latkes?   

 

Yes, very much like it.  I'll post my recipe tomorrow. 

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There are recipes  the tortillitas online, but I adapted one in The New Spanish Table, by Anya von Bremzen.  She calls it "Crisp Shrimp Pancakes from Cadiz, with the subhead, tortillitas  de Camarones.  I suppose if I had followed the recipe as written, I might have turned out something more like what I ate in Spain, but what she calls a mediium-thin pancake batter, I would call a crepe batter.  In other words, I  should have either used less flour or more liquid. 

 

She says to make a shrimp stock using the shells.  An obvious shortcut is boxed or store-made fish or seafood stock. (I've used homemade and store-bought.) For 6 oz. of shrimp (I've used both  finely chopped large shrimp and small rock shrimp, also chopped) make a batter using 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup chickpea flour, 3 T. grated onion, 2T. minced flat-leaf parsley, 1 t. salt, and 1 1/4 cup stock. Whisk until the batter is fairly smooth, then add the shrimp   Let it rest, covered, in the fridge for a couple of hours, ideally, but bring it back to room temp before frying.   Fry in olive oil at 375F.  Use about a tablespoon for each pancake and flatten them after dropping in the olive oil for crispness.  Drain on paper towels. 

 

Bremzen says the yield should be 20 to 22.  I've never come near that number, probably because, as I've noted above, the batter was too thick. I also had a problem flattening the pancakes once they hit the oil for the same reason plus because I used less than the 1/2" depth that she specifies.  Hence, the latke-like character, although the edges had the appropriate crisp texture.  Regardless, we love these and I guess that with practice I could turn out something more like the real thing.

 

We don't have the tiny shrimp here that are used with the shells on in Spain.  I may try chopping up a couple of shrimp shells and adding them to the batter some time.  Maybe not.    

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