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5 minutes ago, Wilfrid said:

Also a good question. I heard a medical expert arguing persuasively that the increase in cases we’re seeing is no longer the crucial metric. We should be looking at hospitalizations and other measures of severe disease, because a lot of these new cases are relatively mild.

Not just relatively mild but asymptomatic. NFL, NYC private schools, Cornell, etc are all doing surveillance testing and picking up tons and tons of cases...

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As of Sunday, fully vaccinated with Pfizer.  Yesterday, a had a sore, arm, headache and low fever.  Today, I'm fine.

gotta cut this out. Its now an endemic virus with actually pretty benign outcomes if you are able to be vaxxed.

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I wonder if for the rest of our lives, 6 month boosters will become the norm?

Or maybe the virus burns itself out in a weaker form? It actually mutates to something less lethal (is that possible?)

We were just saying yesterday (jokingly, I thought) that if they offered another booster to me, I'd probably go get it.

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The last version (Spanish) mutated to a less virulent form and became endemic.  Increasingly looks like what will happen here.

The theory is that the two shots were given too close and that the booster will be longer lasting.

Could end up with an endgame that is an annual shot akin to flu but they don't really know yet.

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45 minutes ago, Wilfrid said:

Also a good question. I heard a medical expert arguing persuasively that the increase in cases we’re seeing is no longer the crucial metric. We should be looking at hospitalizations and other measures of severe disease, because a lot of these new cases are relatively mild.

We should be looking at the product of the number of cases and the seriousness of an individual case (which itself is a product of the seriousness of current variants, vax/infection recency, and the efficacy of antiviral treatments). 

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I just spent 36 hours in Memphis. You'd never guess there was a pandemic/uptick in COVID. And last night, at Bama's basketball game against Memphis, YIKES. Originally we were told fans attending would need to show proof of vaccination. And mask up going in, leaving and keep a mask on if you were within 12 ft of the court. None of the above were in force. Other than our crew, I bet I didn't see more than maybe 200 masks in an arena that held 18,000 +. So not only did we lose a game we shouldn't have (not because Memphis didn't play as well as they have all year-but because we were lethargic at best) now we are truly on COVID watch 😲🤬

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overheard a parent telling their kid that they had to fire the nanny because she lied about something covid related and now grandpa was in the hospital and the father (in a crowd of several hundred people) had to quarantine. 

hope your daughter recovers quickly wilf.

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My wishes for a speedy recovery for your daughter and all involved. I still (barely though) never cease to be amazed at how selfish people can be. Just don't lie about your vaccination status so those of us who want to avoid contact with you can do so. 

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20 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

Also a good question. I heard a medical expert arguing persuasively that the increase in cases we’re seeing is no longer the crucial metric. We should be looking at hospitalizations and other measures of severe disease, because a lot of these new cases are relatively mild.

I'm certainly not going to argue that the # of cases reported hasn't gone up... way up.  However, the "medical expert" you heard is, in my opinion, on the money.  There is ample reason to believe that this will be with us for a very long time (if not forever).  Whether more folks test positive is not a good indicator of a public health crisis if positive tests don't lead to hospitalizations or other major medical problems.   Vaccines, boosters, other measures... all make "I have COVID" less of a doomsday pronouncement.

Secondly, more relevant to Orik's points -- looking at those who have tested for trending data is not "good science".  If everyone was required to test weekly, then okay, but who gets tested and when is a pretty big biasing factor.  It may be that the #s of those carrying COVID have been this high for months, but that most people didn't get tested so we never knew.  Or, it may be that the reason its high now is because those at risk have lately been required to test if they weren't vaccinated. Or... well, you get the point.  If the sample is biased, then the conclusions are suspect.

Bottom line is that I think we (those of us vaccinated and boostered at any rate) are in better shape then suggested.  At least right now.  Unfortunately, viruses mutate and adapt.  

 

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