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As of Sunday, fully vaccinated with Pfizer.  Yesterday, a had a sore, arm, headache and low fever.  Today, I'm fine.

I wonder if they'll go back to claiming they're gluten intolerant after this. 

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I have an appointment for shingles part 2 in early May. I couldn’t sleep on my arm for a week after the first one. My mil was totally on my case about getting the vaccine - spouse had a very mild case of shingles at the end of the summer. He had gotten his first vaccine but never went back for his second dose. He has since gotten it. (His case was very mild -,the vax blunted the worst of it)

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How quickly do the symptoms from the shingles vaccine set in? And +/- how long do they last? I need to take it. But need to figure out the best plan thanks to having to travel a lot in the upcoming months. TIA.

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2nd booster this morning.  

Feeling a little crappy, but nothing really bad.

 I really think arm pain, when it happens, is due to where the shot lands (and the size/gauge of the needle being used), not what's in the shot itself.

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9 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

really think arm pain, when it happens, is due to where the shot lands (and the size/gauge of the needle being used), not what's in the shot itself.

Actually it's really from what's inside - injecting the same amount of saline (or even much more) will have minimal effect. 

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5 hours ago, Orik said:

Actually it's really from what's inside - injecting the same amount of saline (or even much more) will have minimal effect. 

Sure - I understand the immune response and the inflammatory response...it's an insult to the body, after all. But there's also this, which I think happens to some who get very sore arms...and when medical workers are overwhelmed and aren't as cautious.

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How Does It Happen?

SIRVA can happen if a medical worker gives you a vaccine shot too high up on your upper arm. That could accidentally damage tissues or structures in the shoulder.

The right place to give this type of shot is in the middle, thickest part of the deltoid, a large triangular muscle that goes from your upper arm bone to your collarbone.

To prevent SIRVA and give these shots properly, many medical workers are trained to look or feel for specific physical “landmarks” on the arm that guide them to the deltoid muscle.

 

 

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18 hours after second booster shot = no reaction whatsoever, not even tender arm.

Husband says we're obviously not purebreds, merely junk yard dogs.

Disclaimer: drank a glass of water before and several champagne after.    Recommend both.

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