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Restaurants in a post-coronavirus world

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Rich, I don't get it.  YOU'RE the person who posted you were glad you got to a restaurant the last night before the more serious stay-home rules went into effect (when we were still being asked -- but not yet told -- to stay home).  Why will the great mass of people not feel the same way you did yourself, when they're told it's safe enough to go out again?

 

(Indeed, you even said you hoped you'd caught the virus so you could get better and then be immune.)

Correct on both statements. But as I said in the first post - we're  (this group) is not the average American.

 

I do wish someone, anyone would read what I write instead or pulling sentences out of context. It's not the first time this has happened.

 

A good friend of mine just recovered from CD19, he is a lucky one - now he's immune unless another strain forms. On the other hand we have to survive the next several weeks or months while worrying.

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Why would anyone assume there will be restaurants in a post-Corona world? We may get so used to not having them, that we may realize we don't need them.

 

 

Missing the whole point of my comment. It's not about money or wanting.

 

How long will it take a 4-top to feel comfortable sitting next to another 4-top, sitting next to another 4-top?  

How long will it take people to feel comfortable to go to those very, very close theater seats. 

How long will it take people to fly in close quarters?

How long will it take people to sit in a closed arena to watch a sporting event?

How long will it take people to visit a friend's home for a dinner party of six or eight?

Could go on and on, but remember, the foodie population here is a lot more forgiving than the general public. While we may not have a problem with one or any of these, the general population will. Understand society, this is shaken us/them to the core.

We, in all our high mindedness, don't have the ability to save the restaurant industry as we knew it. Take-out and delivery is the restaurant model of the post-Corona era - IMO of course.

Rich -

The above is what you wrote and I highlighted the term "post-Corona" in both your posts.  That is all that was being responded to, in context, by Orik, me and then others.  No attempt was made to miss your point that this is serious.  Or to disagree that the restaurant industry is in for major change, maybe for the better (probably not).  However, when it is all over and done with, if we survive it, people will revert back to close socialization quickly.  Every behavioral model shows that.  That's what/who humans are.  People revert back to "norm" as a survival mechanism and as a security blanket.  When the "all clear" siren is sounded, you will throw a dinner party, Ginny & I will celebrate at Noodle Pudding and vacation plans will be made.  When a light turns green, I look both ways before I cross, but I don't stand in place very long.  You'll see.  Just stay well in the interim.

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Rich, I don't get it.  YOU'RE the person who posted you were glad you got to a restaurant the last night before the more serious stay-home rules went into effect (when we were still being asked -- but not yet told -- to stay home).  Why will the great mass of people not feel the same way you did yourself, when they're told it's safe enough to go out again?

 

(Indeed, you even said you hoped you'd caught the virus so you could get better and then be immune.)

Correct on both statements. But as I said in the first post - we're  (this group) is not the average American.

 

I do wish someone, anyone would read what I write instead or pulling sentences out of context. It's not the first time this has happened.

 

A good friend of mine just recovered from CD19, he is a lucky one - now he's immune unless another strain forms. On the other hand we have to survive the next several weeks or months while worrying.

 

 

No, because I don't think the restaurant industry (at least in NYC) is fueled by people like you and me and the rest of us here.  It's fueled by people who are desperate to get out of their apartments -- and aren't too picky about what they eat and drink once they do.  And once they get the go-ahead, they're going to be more desperate than ever.

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Remember the last days before the stay-home order?  The big problem the City had was keeping people OUT of bars and restaurants.  That was one of the reasons the order was deemed necessary.

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Others here know much more than I about the economics (e.g. Bonner), but it seems like the "delivery future" discussed here isn't really viable for restaurants. And per Eater, the take-out model during the pandemic is putting restaurant workers at risk due to the lax attention being paid to distancing rules, so restaurants are shutting that down, too. Maybe Daniel has a different take.

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My best estimate is that overall restaurant sales volume here is 5% of normal, and since most restaurants are closed, the ones that remain open are running at 25% of normal. Of course there are some exceptions. 

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Btw, corner bodegas were already in trouble and many are closing now, not to reopen.

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Btw, corner bodegas were already in trouble and many are closing now, not to reopen.

 

totally... every one of my locals complain all the time.. business sucks. times story where they said if you make 2 g's in a day, you are doing good, was kind of shocking..   people are smoking less, buying less newspapers... can't find whippets anymore, there are tons of bottle shops and the culture has changed tremendously.. especially now, they are so cramped and narrow, no one wants to go into them.   Most of them are just fence operations. I wish they were weed spots but, they even stopped that for the most parts.  But yeh, the bodega is hurting.

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A very small sample: the village of Vò in Veneto.

 

Presuming an effective vaccine is not forthcoming soon, there will be a weird transitional period after the peak when the Immune and the Uninfected may have to live separate, parallel lives.

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Looking back...

 

I’d then head down to San Francisco, traveling back in time to dine at the now-shuttered Stars when it was at its peak, starting in 1984 when it opened as a sexy shrine to California Cuisine. Stars was chef Jeremiah Tower’s spectacular reintroduction of American regional cooking at a time when French chefs reigned supreme.

I could make the argument that Stars was the greatest restaurant in American history. Tower was a major force in getting Americans to fall in love with their own cuisine again. The Harvard grad with the aristocratic bearing was a genius chef whose technique was pure and gimmick-free. He excelled at juxtaposing flavors, and forged a path of his own using local ingredients, of which California had a bounty. For starters I’d have cornmeal blinis with lobster. The main course would be duck breast topped with mango and chili salsa. It’s innovative combinations like that that showed other chefs that they were free to leave the classics behind and follow their imaginations.

Maybe I’d hang out at the bar until the wee hours, and perhaps catch a glimpse of Rudoph Nureyev or Luciano Pavarotti. When Tower felt playful, he’d put hotdogs and sauerkraut accompanied by champagne on the menu as a late-night snack. I’d probably finish the evening with that.

 

 

https://www.splicetoday.com/consume/my-fantasy-tour-of-wonderful-old-restaurants?fbclid=IwAR3ID06q79YKbmJA9LGAzaUET-gxYAMFsIpa81qbSO_kfNpausbhqqQXmho

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Missing Lutèce at its peak is one of the few things that make me wish I'd been a little older during the 20th century.

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Being old now is such a boon.  (I'm serious.)

You don't even qualify for the category.

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