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Stone

Would you eat it?

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I'm very good about tossing anything even slightly suspicious, but in reality you're extremely unlikely to get sick. You might eat some fly eggs if the meat was uncovered, I guess.

It's also worth being aware of the level of nonsense in regulations and guidelines. For example, in the US you're supposed to keep food under 41F and fish under 38F, but in Japan both can be kept under 50F. In the US cooked rice left outside is going to melt you from the inside, but in Japan everyone eats that from age 3 to 18, at least. FDA says you're supposed to get cooked food from 135F to 41F in under 6 hours, but if you've made a pot of chili that is just not going to happen unless you own a blast chiller, and even then maybe not:

https://schoolnutrition.org/uploadedFiles/5_News_and_Publications/4_The_Journal_of_Child_Nutrition_and_Management/Spring_2005/7-olds.pdf

Anyway, toss it because eew.

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It's all about cost/benefit I guess.

But if I had a 4 or 5 year old kid, I'm probably not feeding that kid taco meat that has been left out all night, unless ready to do a fair amount of clean up.

I guess I believe we're all lucky enough to be able to toss $2 worth of food that might be suspect.

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1 hour ago, Orik said:

I'm very good about tossing anything even slightly suspicious, but in reality you're extremely unlikely to get sick. You might eat some fly eggs if the meat was uncovered, I guess.

It's also worth being aware of the level of nonsense in regulations and guidelines. For example, in the US you're supposed to keep food under 41F and fish under 38F, but in Japan both can be kept under 50F. In the US cooked rice left outside is going to melt you from the inside, but in Japan everyone eats that from age 3 to 18, at least. FDA says you're supposed to get cooked food from 135F to 41F in under 6 hours, but if you've made a pot of chili that is just not going to happen unless you own a blast chiller, and even then maybe not:

https://schoolnutrition.org/uploadedFiles/5_News_and_Publications/4_The_Journal_of_Child_Nutrition_and_Management/Spring_2005/7-olds.pdf

Anyway, toss it because eew.

I imagine in your business, despite the screwed up regs, you kinda want to make sure not a single customer ends up sick, so you err on the side of caution. As I do at home.

I was doing some work at a bar in Miami years ago. I'll never forget seeing one of the barbacks reaching into a giant olive jar with his hand - and the owner almost killing him.

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I don't need to err on any side because I design processes that never get to that point, and I do so based on scientific guidelines and not on hamfisted blanket rules. While we were getting our HACCP plan approved I actually got the city's DOH to change their rules in a couple of places where they made no sense or went against USDA and FDA guidelines (e.g. sous vide cooking is allowed at 140 or less in many cases, but sous vide reheating was required to bring food all the way up to 160).

Also it helps that everything we serve I'd feel comfortable eating raw (except for wild mushrooms, etc. that are toxic raw, and parasite laden fish, obvs.)

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N once made this lovely fish pie, and we forgot to refrigerate the leftovers.  When we discovered it the next morning, she made me toss it all into the compost pile.

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Eh. So our nanny foraged about a lb of chanterelles from our property.  Mrs AB is very anti eating them.  I talked with nanny about identification and she seems to know how to identify them vs the look a likes.  Also the most common look a like is bitter. Nanny regularly forages chanterelles in Pennsylvania.

Thoughts?

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I totally understand Mrs AB's reticence.   I remember my panic when a fellow Thanksgiving guest in the country arrived with a huge basket of foraged mushrooms.     Fortunately, our host glommed the hoard, declaring it was being saved for himself.    Dodged that one.

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maybe go to a farmers market that has a mushroom person and ask them.. or even more so, pay to have someone come and do a walk of your grounds.. The other day, I was sitting in my mother in laws backyard and thought of a really fun gift.. I am not going to do it but, if you were to hire a ornithologist and have them walk the grounds an identify the birds during a particular season.. also have someone walk the grounds and identify the trees and plants and such, obviously wild mushrooms would be involved in that..   But, since mushrooms are reoccuring, it might be worth it to hire a mushroom guy to come to your house.. it should cost less than a hundred bucks and you will know for years to come 

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4 minutes ago, Anthony Bonner said:

 

i guess what im asking is on the continuum of mushroom ID how hard are chanterelles?

Supposedly pretty easy to identify.    I just go by the traditional saw

There are old mushroom hunters and there are bold mushroom hunters.

But there are no old, bold mushroom hunters.

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28 minutes ago, Daniel said:

maybe go to a farmers market that has a mushroom person and ask them.. or even more so, pay to have someone come and do a walk of your grounds.. The other day, I was sitting in my mother in laws backyard and thought of a really fun gift.. I am not going to do it but, if you were to hire a ornithologist and have them walk the grounds an identify the birds during a particular season.. also have someone walk the grounds and identify the trees and plants and such, obviously wild mushrooms would be involved in that..   But, since mushrooms are reoccuring, it might be worth it to hire a mushroom guy to come to your house.. it should cost less than a hundred bucks and you will know for years to come 

I have frequently thought of having an expert walk me around our weekend place at various times of year.    Also on roadsides.   

Parenthetically, I have emoted on what an extraordinary spring we've had in terms of wildflowers and flowering shrubs.   Husband has found that it has also been a bonanza year for poison oak.    He is getting over the case from hell, one that became systemic, covering his body with blisters coming from his immune systems over-response.   Now, for the last three visits he has spent his time digging out huge infestations, bagging it for garbage.   You can;t burn it because the smoke will give send the blisters to your lungs.    Happy spring; happy foraging.  

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Chanterelles are very easy. Google says there's one similar mushroom that'll make you puke, but I've never seen it.

 

Or if not the nanny then invite stone over.

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as per my now-retired colleague who is a lifelong forager, and gives us some each fall, chanterelles are very easy.

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