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I think this deserves its very own thread, since it's more than just a Surreal Annoyance. And some of its abuses are so egregious. Or just hilarious. Like this one:

 

The wife of one of my business colleagues is a Project Manager in the pharmaceutical industry. She recently submitted a comparison chart to her boss for approval, and received this response:

 

R____:

 

As we discussed, would you please perform a spell check on

this table.  "Worst" is not a word (regulatory table), the correct

spelling is worse.

 

If you are not sure of a term or its spelling, let me know and

we can discuss on Monday.

 

M____

This was R_____'s response:

M_____:

 

Please note that "Worst" is a word (and is in the dictionary). 

"Worse" case would not be the correct grammatical term.  You

generally refer to the set as Worst, Realistic, and Best Case

Scenario.  If you still want it changed, let me know.  I ran the

spell check - twice.

 

R_____

 

I've learned to stop questioning how idiots like this ascend to positions of power.

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I think this deserves its very own thread, since it's more than just a Surreal Annoyance. And some of its abuses are so egregious. Or just hilarious. Like this one:   The wife of one of my business

Among those who use the term, "aks" for "ask" is communicatively effective. If you and I decide to use "hello" to mean "goodbye", it will be communicatively effective between us, but I'm not sure that

You don't know that, do you?

Misuse of the apostrophe is probably the thing that gets me the most. I mean how hard is it? How can one graduate from high school and not understand the difference between it's and its? Or the difference between a plural noun and a possessive? As in, "We Sell Taco's"?

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On reflection, I actually think this is my favorite part of the initial exchange:

 

If you are not sure of a term or its spelling, let me know and

we can discuss on Monday.

 

I'd love to see the minutes from that meeting.

 

 

And Jaymes? I'm, so with you on the apostrophe thing. It really chap's my ass.

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the language does evolve nicely over time, however.

 

years ago, "their" was not an approved usage as a reflexive ("each person will take their book" wasn't accepted. the proper usage was "his" book, except in situations where the situation required otherwise, as a reference to books held by nuns.)

 

today, that archaic usage has been abandoned in favor of more inclusive terminology, and "their" is OK, which is another accepted term now

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So true. I'm just about to give up on 'hopefully' as an adverb. I have watched hopefully in the hopes that the incorrect use will evaporate. Alas, the opposite has occurred, and the incorrect is becoming correct.

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I was thinking about the ubiquitous use of "awesome" and I decided that for someone who doesn't have a lot of words at their fingertips with which to describe something good, they just make the sound of indecision (which is "uh") and then add a "some" and they get, its uhhhhh... some. Thats why its so popular. :(

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