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Is this traditionally made with large pieces of meat?  I also always thought this was a Cuban dish. 

One more thought....most of the "easy" recipes I have for picadillo call for ground beef, or pork, or (best) a mixture of the two.

 

And there is a Cuban version of picadillo.

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One more thought....most of the "easy" recipes I have for picadillo call for ground beef, or pork, or (best) a mixture of the two.   And there is a Cuban version of picadillo.

The law says you have to use raisins.   Gosh, y'all, if you don't like raisins, leave'em out.   <looks over shoulder for picadillo police>

I think there are a couple of votes for picadillo. If the 'ayes' have it, I'll post a recipe.

I made Cristina's picadillo recipe yesterday. It's makes a vast quantity and is very good. I servered it, per her suggestion with steamed white rice, but instead of refritos, I served bayo beans, sliced avocado and some mango. I think the raisins, along with the olives and cinnamon, are more a reflection of the Moorish roots of many Mexican (and Spanish) dishes. The raisins and olives together kind of give that sweet/sour combination. As does the pear and a tart apple.

 

I wonder how well this stuff will freeze......................

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Is this traditionally made with large pieces of meat?  I also always thought this was a Cuban dish. 

One more thought....most of the "easy" recipes I have for picadillo call for ground beef, or pork, or (best) a mixture of the two.

 

And there is a Cuban version of picadillo.

My "easy" version is pretty good - I can imagine the slow version is even better.

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Isn't picadillo roughly translated as hash? I think in its truest sense, it's a mix of things most likely to be leftover in the fridge.

Regarding stuffing poblano chiles with picadillo. I'm sure you've heard of the famous "Chiles en Nogada." That's basically poblanos stuffed with picadillo, and then covered with walnut sauce.

 

I think if you're working on a specific preparation like that, you'd want to follow a more formal recipe for picadillo.

 

But I'm sure that if you're just slinging together something for tonight's dinner, you'd use the "what've we got?" approach.

Seems to me as though there was a discussion of Chiles en Nogada here on MF a while back. I haven't searched for it, but whoever it was that was interested could try some of these recipes for picadillo to come up with a stuffing that they like.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Doing a search on mole negro for another thread, I noticed that Zarela Martinez is going to be on 'In Julia's Kitchen With Master Chefs' on March 14 demonstrating picadillo-stuffed chiles:

 

Zarela Martinez prepares poblanos chiles rellenos. Demonstrating the influence of North Africa on Spanish/Mexican cooking, Martinez stuffs the chiles with a combination of pork, dried fruits and olives.

PBS site for the show

 

 

~A

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Isn't picadillo roughly translated as hash? I think in its truest sense, it's a mix of things most likely to be leftover in the fridge.

Regarding stuffing poblano chiles with picadillo. I'm sure you've heard of the famous "Chiles en Nogada." That's basically poblanos stuffed with picadillo, and then covered with walnut sauce.

 

I think if you're working on a specific preparation like that, you'd want to follow a more formal recipe for picadillo.

 

But I'm sure that if you're just slinging together something for tonight's dinner, you'd use the "what've we got?" approach.

Seems to me as though there was a discussion of Chiles en Nogada here on MF a while back. I haven't searched for it, but whoever it was that was interested could try some of these recipes for picadillo to come up with a stuffing that they like.

Jaymes, I don't know if this is what you are thinking, but one of the dishes we ordered at Fiesta Tepa-Sahuayo is the Chiles Nogada. DAMN, it was good.

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I plan to make Cristina's recipe for picadillo sometime later this week. It looks absolutely fabulous. I'm sure you can't find a more delicious, nor authentic version. But for folks that are interested in making something easier and quicker, here are three. They are from various sources and are paraphrased:

 

Picadillo (minced meat) -- "Can be made a variety of ways with different ingredients. In Cuba, the dish is served with fried bananas." - Maria Bermudez

 

1/4 C olive oil

1 small onion, chopped

1 small bell pepper, chopped, or other mild chile

3 garlic cloves, crushed and minced

1/3 C mushrooms, sliced

1 C tomato sauce

2 oz tomato puree

1 t vinegar

1 T salt

1 /2 t cayenne

1 lb cooked ground beef

1/2 lb cooked pork, chopped

1/2 C dry white wine

1/3 C raisins

1/4 C chopped black olives

1/4 C chopped pecans

 

Saute onion, pepper, garlic and mushrooms briefly, until wilted. Add tomato sauce and puree. Allow to simmer for 1-2 minutes. Add meat and cook for additional 5-8 minutes. Add remaining ingredients and cook over medium heat until liquid evaporates.

 

 

 

Picadillo Festivo -- "...one of those dishes that is great to prepare for a large group of people. Once assembled, it will keep until you are ready to serve. I prefer hot flour tortillas with it but very good sandwiches can be made with this filling. [she advises getting fresh French rolls, or bollilos, cutting off the top, digging out some of the bread and filling it with picadillo] ...add some fresh salsa, some shredded lettuce and some quacamole, replace top, squeeze to meld all the ingredients, and start eating..." -- Aida Gabilongo (Zarela's mother)

 

1 lb ground pork

1 lb lean ground beef

2 T lard

S&P to taste

2 white or yellow onions, chopped

4 cloves garlic, mashed and chopped

3 med tomatoes, peeled & chopped

3 canned jalapenos in escabeche, seeded & sliced

1 t ground cinnamon, preferably Mexican canela

1/2 t ground cloves

1/4 C slivered almonds

1 T sugar

1 T vinegar

1 C chicken broth (at the ready)

 

In large skilled, brown meats in lard until no longer pink. Add S&P. Add all remaining ingredients except broth and simmer, covered for 30 minutes. If the meat becomes dry and is sticking, add broth. Taste and correct seasonings. Aida adds that this is a good filling for burritos, and the "accepted filling for Chiles en Nogada," which is garnished with the nut sauce and pomegranate seeds.

 

 

Quick Picadillo

 

1 T lard

1 lb lean ground beef

2 T oil

1 onion, finely chopped

1 potato, peeled & diced

1 ripe fresh tomato, chopped

1 t salt

1/2 t pepper

1 t ground Mexican cinnamon (canela)

1/2 t ground cloves

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1/2 C golden raisins

1/4 C sliced green olives stuffed with pimento

1/2 C water or chicken broth

 

In large skillet brown meat in lard just until no longer pink. Drain grease. In separate skilled, saute onion, potato, tomato and seasonings for about 5 minutes. Add to meat. Add all ingredients. Cover and cook over mediuim heat 10 minutes, or until proper consistancy. Add a little additional water or chicken broth if needed.

 

Serve as filling for burritos, or as a dip for parties, or main dish with veggies and a salad.

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How I make picadillo.

 

I do what I suspect most of you do. I gather a bunch of recipes, select one of them to use as a sort of a model, and then pick and choose ingredients, methods, etc., from the others.

 

That's why I have given several recipes.

 

And if you can't find a recipe for picadillo in your fave Mex cookbook, look under Chiles en Nogada. The stuffing will undoubtedly be a picadillo.

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Where the heck have I been? I missed nearly all of pages 2 and 3 of this thread. Asleep at the wheel here...

 

Picadillo is always either shredded pork or, in a pinch, ground beef. I've never seen it with big pieces of meat such as are in that photo. What was that photo supposed to be? It wasn't ropa vieja, the Cuban speciality--ropa vieja is also made with shredded meat. It looked like pepper beef. :blush:

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On raisins -- if you're one of the folks that doesn't like the texture, you might try plumping them and chopping.

 

But, if you'll notice the middle recipe I gave above, the one for Picadillo Festivo, you'll see that it doesn't call for raisins. So I hope that among the several recipes we've given here, there will be something for everyone.

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I hate the way raisins taste. :blush: I will either substitute dried apricots or use a raisin-free recipe when i make the picadillo.

 

I may have to skip the chiles en nogada, though. Walnuts make my mouth itch.

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"On raisins -- if you're one of the folks that doesn't like the texture, you might try plumping them and chopping."

 

Oh yes the plumping of the raisins. I love using a bit of tequila and/or orange juice. I bought monster raisins back with me from Oaxaca - so much more flavourful than the ones you buy in the stores here.

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