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(See also the current fine dining in NYC thread).

It is very easy to push a check past $150 per person here. The food alone would really support a $100 check, but I am a sucker for the feel of the place, the good service and being recognized. I finally ate the Parisian sausage, good but fairly plain -- a sort of coarse-ground garlic sausage, served cold with mustard. Then the rabbit braised in cream with tarragon and joined by a truffled boudin blanc.

Eating the rabbit, I couldn't help think that this is a dish I can make and have made to the same standard at home. Le C is making the sausages and boudins in house, and that would be a lot of effort. But this is a meal which could be replicated fairly easily with some bought sausages.

I still enjoyed it, they still need a cheese course and a dress code. I am now in the habit of finishing up here with a glass of Malvasia and espresso instead of dessert (or cheese).

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How short were the shorts? Did you catch a glimpse of any Parisian sausage?

Drink more?

I set up a separate drinks account on a separate credit card. 

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How would you say their food compares to Frenchette?

I don't think I've found any restaurant in New York this century willing to make boeuf bourguignon as good as what any of us could prepare at home. There's very little incentive to do trad cuisine bourgeoise here, especially the slow sort. 

Speaking of boeuf bourguignon, I had no idea that Brillat-Savarin was not a fan: 'une viande bouillie est, selon lui, "de la chair moins son jus"'.

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On 9/28/2021 at 11:11 PM, Orik said:

I feel like this would all be fine at around 40% of current prices. 

IF it was 75%, we'd probably be regulars.  Instead, we still haven't even gone.  Its been several years since Sneak lamented that $100pp was the new norm for decent food in an ok environment, so I figure that a place like this can be worth 50% more, given that its a better than decent place and its been a tough time.  But not 100% more.

Of course, when I think that Balthazar, Minetta, etc would be even more $ for less content, I keep re-evaluating.  But, then again, I did that with Frenchette as well and never convinced myself.  Was Cercle Rouge, at its best, that unsustainable?  

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Fairly certain I'll find most bourgeois prices in 2022…discouraging. Meanwhile, which of you is going to order the veal chop for $65? Otoh are some of the wines on this list unexpectedly reasonable? I'm looking at you, 2013 Gevrey-Chambertin from Coudray-Bizot. [Is $380 for their Echezeaux also sort of reasonable?]

So, what's the 'Hotel Room' dessert, and what vagaries of the market make it impossible to fix its price for one month or two?

I can no longer remember what I thought of Cercle Rouge…

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I kinda half blame that on restaurants -- they should be clear -- and half blame it on customers, who should know better.

There's a friend I go out to eat with with some frequency.  He doesn't eat out much aside from that (and rarely in the City rather than the burbs, so he's not aware of dining trends even when his local restaurants belatedly mimic them).

If the waiter offers some really expensive cut of meat, priced out of line with the rest of the menu, he'll always order it, thinking that if it's that expensive, it must be really special.  He doesn't realize that if the price is that out of line, it must be really big.  So he always ends up taking home lots of leftovers, we nevertheless spiit the check evenly, and I get pissed off.

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(But I mean of course, even if the hyper-expensive dish is only portioned for a single person, it's incumbent upon the person who orders it to make some adjustment when the check is split.

(I mean, whenever this person and I go to an Italian restaurant and I order a three-course dinner and he doesn't, I always insist on adjusting the check split so I pay more.)

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7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

(But I mean of course, even if the hyper-expensive dish is only portioned for a single person, it's incumbent upon the person who orders it to make some adjustment when the check is split.

(I mean, whenever this person and I go to an Italian restaurant and I order a three-course dinner and he doesn't, I always insist on adjusting the check split so I pay more.)

What do we do when we're dining with someone who does not drink? 

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Have to admit my incorrigible sweet tooth would prefer pastry chefs to cheese courses. I mean if restaurants could offer just one.

Forecast later this week nearly 80 F. Maybe I'll wear shorts.

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33 minutes ago, mitchells said:

What do we do when we're dining with someone who does not drink? 

We ask for separate checks. Or we hand the person what we owe in cash at the end of the meal. And by "we," I mean me.

Because sometimes this happens: We dined out with another couple and their daughter at Hwa Yuan a while ago. The couple's meals and mine cost about the same. Their daughter had a spare rib appetizer and a half Peking duck (probably $50ish total). H had seafood lo mein (<$20). And the couple said, well, H doesn't drink and neither does our daughter, so you guys pay 2/5 and we'll pay 3/5 and it all works out. I sucked it up and H is probably still pissed off.

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