Jump to content

Mexican food outside Mexico


Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...
  • Replies 52
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Was not sure if I needed to start a new topic or not so here goes. Yesterday, I was in our local super mercado here in Tulsa. They had probably 6 brands of Mexican vanilla and tons of hot sauces. What is your favorite to use? I am looking for some guidance before investing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the Herdez salsas, if I'm not making my own. But frankly, it's so easy to make your own that I don't know why you'd bother buying it.

 

Still -- if I'm in a pinch, I like Herdez salsa casera, and the salsa verde.

 

As for the vanilla -- I have to admit that's something I splurge on. I buy Nielsen-Massey. They have a Mexican vanilla that's much cheaper than their Madasgar, and I think it's terrific. I don't bake much, so it's worth it to me.

 

As far as hot sauces go, see if they have Marie Sharp's. It's not Mexican -- it's from Belize -- but it's very tasty and they might have it. Among the hot sauces that are fairly easy to find, I like Tapatio and Cholula.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I often use queso oaxaca (Oaxacan cheese) in quesadillas.

 

You can also peel the ball apart and serve shreds of queso oaxaca over chilaquiles.

 

It makes a great grilled cheese sandwich, too--first grill thick slices of buttered bread in a hot sauté pan, then grill the cheese separately in the same pan. When the cheese is golden brown on one side, flip it over and grill the other side, then squish the crusty melted cheese between the slices of bread.

 

I also slice it in 1/4" thick quarter rounds and eat it on crackers with ate de membrillo (sweet, thick quince paste)--this after-dinner treat is usually made with queso manchego, but I like it just as well with queso oaxaca.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So we went! Met Tana and her delightful family. And had a most amazing meal. I had the Chiles en Nogada, along with a plate that included cheese crepas with rose petal sauce. The combination of the cheese and the very slight sweetness of the rose petals was perfect. And something new for me.

 

The other folks had the 'mixed grill' which Tana pictured earlier on the thread. It was all just delicious.

 

Things were made even more festive by the fact that Watsonville was in the merry throes of the annual Strawberry Festival. Music and singing and dancing and a carnival.

 

A perfect evening.

 

Thanks, Tana.

Link to post
Share on other sites
here's a related but unrelated question. i found a grocery store (it's in new york state) selling what appears to be authentic oaxacan string cheese. is that legal to import?

I'm pretty sure it is. I have a vague memory of being in Oaxaca and being told that yes I can bring home the chiles and cheese.

Link to post
Share on other sites
here's a related but unrelated question.  i found a grocery store (it's in new york state) selling what appears to be authentic oaxacan string cheese.  is that legal to import?

I'm pretty sure it is. I have a vague memory of being in Oaxaca and being told that yes I can bring home the chiles and cheese.

Here's what US Customs has to say:

 

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/vacation...tizens/faqs.xml

 

Specifically,

 

"Q: Why Did U.S. Customs and Border Protection Take My Food?

A: Because CBP Officers are stationed at ports of entry and along our land and sea borders, they are often called upon to enforce laws and requirements of other Government agencies. This is done to protect community health, preserve domestic plant and animal life, etc.

Many fruits and vegetables are either prohibited from entering the United States or require an import permit. Every fruit or vegetable must be declared to the Customs officer and must be presented for inspection, no matter how free of pests it appears to be. Failure to declare all food products can result in civil penalties. Meats, livestock, poultry, and their by-products are either prohibited or restricted from entering the United States, depending on the animal disease condition in the country of origin. Fresh meat is generally prohibited from most countries. Canned, cured, or dried meat is severely restricted from most countries. Bakery items and all cured cheeses are generally admissible. You should contact the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Services for more detailed information."

Link to post
Share on other sites
So we went! Met Tana and her delightful family. And had a most amazing meal. I had the Chiles en Nogada, along with a plate that included cheese crepas with rose petal sauce. The combination of the cheese and the very slight sweetness of the rose petals was perfect. And something new for me.

 

The other folks had the 'mixed grill' which Tana pictured earlier on the thread. It was all just delicious.

 

Things were made even more festive by the fact that Watsonville was in the merry throes of the annual Strawberry Festival. Music and singing and dancing and a carnival.

 

A perfect evening.

 

Thanks, Tana.

I forgot to give you the bag of Meyer lemons I brought, Jaymes. Darn it.

 

For the record, I will repeat my recommendation: I prefer eating earlier in the day, and when it's not rush hour. I have never seen the restaurant so packed, and service suffered accordingly. It truly is slow food at its best, but no need to tempt the fates into making it the slowest food.

 

Leftovers for breakfast, mmmmm, mmmmmmm!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...