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I'm not sure why anyone would "go out for a Peruvian", or to any South American restaurant for that matter. There is no "cuisine" as such, just lots of heavy carb laden stodge. Which maybe fine if you've got to herd goats up and down mountains all day, but which lacks any kind of point for London's office bound sophisticates. I went once to the Brazilian restaurant on Highgate Hill and was only too grateful that we had only to slide down to Archway afterwards. Walking up would have been impossible. How do those girls on the Copocabana stay so thin? :rolleyes:

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Yeah, just like there's no Indian cuisine - just this crappy over-spiced stuff :( I shall enjoy watching you eat your words one of these days, Tuckerman :rolleyes:

 

v

Vanessa, behave. Indian cuisine has a fine and sophisticated tradition. As does Chinese and Thai cuisine. They are based on royal court cuisines that were developed over centuries. South American cuisine is based on...what? Give me one example :(

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There is good South American home style cooking in Australia. One really nice Argentine dish is a flank of veal which is stuffed with veg, herbs and stuff, rolled, poached then pressed. You serve at room temp. cut into slices swerved with various sauces.

 

The proberly wouldn't work in London as London's office bound sophisticates obviously equate ethnic dining with grilled meats only.

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Vanessa, behave. Indian cuisine has a fine and sophisticated tradition. As does Chinese and Thai cuisine. They are based on royal court cuisines that were developed over centuries. South American cuisine is based on...what? Give me one example

 

I find the idea that a cuisine has to evolve from some royal-court origins in order to be worthwhile or even a tradition incredibly bizarre. French or Italian pesant food is obviously very different from what was eaten as 'haute' in the C18th, say, but has had incalcuable influence on modern 'gourmet' or wahtever you want to call it food. Presumably there are/were indigenous upper-class cooking traditions in central and south america that either haven't reached the west or, more likely, died out after Columbus and the collapse of those socities. But - tradition or not - a really well done ceviche is a complex and sophisticated dish that requires very careful seasoning, for instance, and certainly is beginning to feature as a part of American highend restaurant food, as well as found in 65cent portions sold by roadside trucks. I agree some other things cans be either carb or redmeat overloaded pretty badly, but I certainly don't think trashing an entire continent's food because of the seeming lack of 'being based on something' - again, what is french country cooking based on - makes much sense. Time to put my mouth where my words are or some such and actually try a London ceviche I think....

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alexhills

 

You are quite right: bizarre. There's rather a lot of food board history, in-jokes and tongues firmly lodged in cheeks going in exchanges like these. Every phrase has layers of meaning that are, perhaps fortunately, pretty meaningless to newer members of this board.

 

Of course Tuckerman might still be under the impression that South America is a country and I'm sure last time he ate a bad Italian meal he was found denigrating European cooking to all and sundry.... :lol:

 

 

v

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Of course Tuckerman might still be under the impression that South America is a country and I'm sure last time he ate a bad Italian meal he was found denigrating European cooking to all and sundry.... :lol:

 

I thought that the problem was that they didn't speak English?

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Of course Tuckerman might still be under the impression that South America is a country and I'm sure last time he ate a bad Italian meal he was found denigrating European cooking to all and sundry.... :lol:

 

I thought that the problem was that they didn't speak English?

:lol:

 

v

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Well it's ironic since I'm the only one to have named, and apparently visited, two South American restaurants-one Peruvian, one Brazilian. All you people taking umbrage at my criticism of South American food-how many S. American restaurants have YOU visited lately? How many S. American cookbooks have you bought? How many S. American dishes (apart from Cerviche and those big beany stews from Brazil) do you know? Or rather cook?

 

Fact is you still have this notion that there is some sense of "equality" between cuisines, and that we must never trash a cuisine, even though none of you ever eat it and have little interest in eating it , would hardly ever choose to eat it and doubtless could not care less whether you ever ate it or not- and that goes for the majority of the population of London. But we musn't say that its worse than Indian and Thai etc now, must we :lol:

 

Fact is, if there was an interesting S.Americasn cuisine more people would eat S American food and there would be more than two or three S. American restaurants in London.

 

Simple, really.

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What a breath of fresh air.

 

Tuckerman might want to look at some of the Mexican threads in this forum. I don't myself consider Mexico to be part of South America, but since I detect no discernment between the thoroughly dissimilar cuisines of, say Brazil, Argentina and Venezuala, I don't suppose it matters.

 

New York has some excellent South American restaurants, of course, and you can pay a great deal for the cooking of a chef like Douglas Rodriguez or Claude Troisgros. I am sure this is even more true of other U.S. cities. There are reasons why this is not the case in London, but they are so bleeding obvious I can't be bothered to state them.

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And, don't forget, no one will pay top dollar for South American cuisine so, like Indian, it must be rubbish.

 

No. Nobody will pay ANYTHING for S. American cuisine in London (apart from the places I've mentioned). And people will and do pay top dollar for Indian cusine, so wrong on both counts, I'm afraid Glynn

 

Why this weird need to defend the indefensible? I'm perfectly willing to accept that there are people from S. America who can cook well. I'm sure they're very creative. But when we talk about a "cuisine" we are talking about an oeuvre, a body of work, a gastronomic tradition, which leads to people wanting to eat the cuisine in great numbers in restaurants and buying cookbooks about it and buying ingredients and cooking it at home when it is not part of their home cuisine.

 

It just ain't the case. :lol:

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