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Spinning. Mon dieu! I've taken to doing one spin class a week and it's just unbelievably full-on! I cycle 20 minutes each way to work 5 times a week and do a bit of other exercise but am still a complete wreck after 45 minutes. My face stays purple for about an hour.

 

On the positive front, I definitely go up hills faster and generally pay a bit more attention to basic technique - soft elbows, feet going in circles, little weight on the bars when 'dancing'.

 

Have been having fun and games this week with a cafe en route, that thinks it's acceptable to put a big sandwich board in the cycle part of the road (there's a strip between the parked cars and main car part of the road for bikes). I have dropped in to ask them not to do this once, moved the board a couple of times, and co-opted my colleague who also rides to ask them to move the board. The message finally seems to have sunk in.

 

Off to Bali soon and hoping to do a bike ride through the paddy fields.

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  • 3 months later...
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Hi cycling fans...

 

My uncle has turned into a rabid cyclist touring the backroads of New England.

 

My question is if anyone can recommend books in the of cycling memoirs or travelogues or else books related to the Tour de France?

 

I am sifting through Amazon and people's reviews there but thought I might also go 'straight the people'!

 

Thanks in advance if you have any opinions or recommendations!

 

Ludja

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Well, I think your relative could tap some of the websites, including:

 

www.thepaceline.com

www.velonews.com

www.cyclingnews.com

www.dailypeloton.com

www.eurosport.com

www.grahamwatson.com (nice photos)

www.cycling.tv (note no "com" -- this has free broadcasts of certain early season Classics and semi-Classics, and some "pay per view" items. think Kurne-Brussels-Kurne and Hincapie's victory, or Devolder's doing really well in 3 Days of De Panne).

 

John Wilcockson has written almost annual TdF books, mostly from the perspective of covering L Armstrong and USPS/Discovery Channel. Here is his latest one.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193138268...=books&v=glance

 

Earlier versions of the book have little diaries from people like Tyler Hamilton and Christian Van de Velde. These tend to be for people who don't know that much about cycling, as they state things that are somewhat evident to those following cycling periodically.

 

David Coyle wrote a book that is not bad on L Armstrong.

 

And, most obviously, you have autobios from Armstrong -- It's Not About the Bike; Every Second Counts.

 

www.worldcycling.com has lots of DVDs -- including an interesting recent release on CSC called Overcoming. This DVD depicts Riis as a very stressed directeur sportif, in sharp contrast to Bruyneel. The Armstrong Six win package (pre-this year) of DVDs is nice, as it the coverage of Il Falco in this year's Giro, including the infamous penultimate stage and Basso's not doing well on the Stelvio. :D

 

If you're thinking of a gift, the best gift, if your relative does not have OLNTV and their residency area offers that service, is to get them OLNTV. Or one of the newish 10/2 clothing items.

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Oh, very good gifts are the commemorative items.

 

Here is the Jersey (with one shoulder in yellow) that the non-Lance members of the Discovery Channel team wore on the last day of the Tour (the Champs Elysee) this year. It has the seven stars on the front, signalling the seven wins:

 

http://store.trekbikes.com/jump.jsp?itemID...E&bShopOnline=1

 

It's $110.

 

For something more reasonable, yet LA followers will like, here is the "6" hat. For last year's win.

 

http://store.trekbikes.com/jump.jsp?itemID...5&bShopOnline=1

 

A lot of Discovery Channels are available on the www.trekbikes website, because Trek is a sponsor.

 

Other less expensive items:

 

Team CSC hat (the sold out one is the more desirable one)

 

Team CSC water bottle

 

http://www.team-csc.com/shop_products.asp?cat_id=6

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Miles from Nowhere is one of the best books about bicycling I've ever read, and I am not a cyclist. It's the story of Barbara and Larry Savage, a couple who bicycled around the world in the mid-Seventies. Highly recommended in every regard. The first time I heard of it was when Dick Estell (?) read it on NPR's "From the Bookshelf."

 

It's just wonderful. I just saw that it's back in print, which is quite a testament, since it was written nearly thirty years ago. You can get used ones on Half.com, too.

 

EDIT: Particularly poignant is the fact that Barbara Savage was killed shortly before the book went to press: she was struck by a car while cycling. :rolleyes:

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  • 2 months later...

i gave away my bike about 4 years ago and now want to get a new one.

The main purpose is to prepare myself for taking a motorcycle riding course later this year.

So my question is what kind of decent but inexpensive bike should i get.

 

thank you.

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we recently bought entry level Quintana Roo bikes, primarily triathlon bikes, very light weight with aerobars for the flat Florida terrain...love them.

 

Fit is very important, buy from a bike store that will put you on a trainer in and measure you correctly.

also what kind of riding are you going to do...

 

local trips to the store and back or leisurely crusing- hybrid is good then

Biking for fitness- get a road bike

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I'd love to get a road bike this season but have put off even looking because I'm afraid of the price tag. The biggest benefit would be being able to keep up with friends when we go out for rides............fitness levels notwithstanding, my old Specialized hybrid doesn't make it easy to keep up.

 

Can't wait to get outside again to see where I stand after trying to ratchet up my spinning workouts over the winter.

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  • 4 months later...

I'm bumping this thread (even though no one seems to be posting to it this season) because I've become mad (mad, I tell you!) for cycling this year.

 

Seven years ago I got the bug when my friend Greg roped me into doing the AIDS Ride 6 (now defunct?) from Boston to New York City. 270 miles in three days, through much hilly and beautiful Connecticut terrain. I borrowed my father-in-law's ancient 1980s Raleigh Technium road bike and grew to love the freedom of the road as I trained for the ride. I thought I'd keep it up afterward, but I suffered a double blow: my father-in-law shockingly wanted his bike back, and someone stole my bike shoes at an adventure race another friend roped me into. Then winter came, and I just never got back on it.

 

Until this year, when Greg shamed me into getting myself a road bike, a Cannondale. I was in love again as soon as I pedaled off from the bike shop.

 

Since April 21, when I picked up my ride, I've put about 900 miles on it. I started off riding to work, but negotiating traffic doesn't really satisfy my hunger for speed or a good workout. So these days I mostly run home as fast as I can during the week and get in 20 miles or so in Prospect Park.

 

Weekends offer opportunities for longer rides, often the popular ride up the West Side of Manhattan, over the GW Bridge, and then on River Road, which goes up and down in successive hills from the top of the Palisades to the Hudson and then back up again, joining Rte 9W with a good long hill I've been told is a Category 2. I love River Road, but I enjoy the ride up the West Side on Riverside just as much. Riding on Riverside Drive allows you to entertain the fantasy that New York is a totally different kind of place, a city full of winding boulevards next to endless parks, lined with elegant Parisian apartment houses.

 

We recently returned from a couple weeks in Cape Cod, where I was able to get a couple hours of riding in almost daily, mostly heading from Wellfleet to P'town and back, for a round trip of about 32 miles. The Cape offered beautiful country roads, more hills than I expected, and some serious wind. The wind coming off the bay as you turn left into Provincetown really hits you in the face.

 

This past weekend I had maybe my most enjoyable ride yet, a trip from Brooklyn to Cranbury, NJ, where my in-laws live. My wife and kids set out in the car and I met them there by biking from my home in Brooklyn to pier 11 at Wall Street (6.2 miles), catching the 35-minute SeaStreak ferry to Atlantic Highlands (Sandy Hook), NJ, and riding from there to Cranbury (another 43 miles). I constructed my route using this amazing website called njbikemap.com, which contains a map of the entire state of New Jersey with every road color-coded for its suitability for biking. The route I took passed through lovely countryside, some hilly terrain early, and then a pretty flat second half featuring a revolutionary war battlefield and a good number of farms and farmstands. At one point in the middle some folks in a car asked me if I knew where they could find a ShopRite in the area (middle of nowhere). I was amused to see the looks on their faces when I told them I had no idea, I came here from Brooklyn. Later when I stopped at a farmstand to buy water the good people there insisted I take the water for free when they learned I'd biked there from Sandy Hook, even though I insisted it really wasn't that far. Their tomatoes looked good, too, but I had nowhere to put them.

 

Riding a bike is a great way to learn about the areas that surround NYC. If you bike out of the city at all, you learn quickly just how rural and charming it is within a stone's throw of the metropolis.

 

I'm thinking about joining some of the 5:45 a.m. training rides in Central Park run by the NYCC. And I'm planning to do some good riding around New Paltz in a few weeks.

 

That's all I've got. How's your riding?

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Weekends offer opportunities for longer rides, often the popular ride up the West Side of Manhattan, over the GW Bridge, and then on River Road, which goes up and down in successive hills from the top of the Palisades to the Hudson and then back up again, joining Rte 9W with a good long hill I've been told is a Category 2. I love River Road, but I enjoy the ride up the West Side on Riverside just as much.

 

Is this the ride to Piermont? The final hill is a killer. Blovie did it a couple of years ago and still hasn't forgiven the friend who promised him "an easy ride along the Hudson."

 

Several weeks ago they were handing out at the greenmarket the NY Cycling Map which maps out all the bike routes in the five boroughs. It looks like it could be a good planning tool.

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Weekends offer opportunities for longer rides, often the popular ride up the West Side of Manhattan, over the GW Bridge, and then on River Road, which goes up and down in successive hills from the top of the Palisades to the Hudson and then back up again, joining Rte 9W with a good long hill I've been told is a Category 2. I love River Road, but I enjoy the ride up the West Side on Riverside just as much.

 

Is this the ride to Piermont? The final hill is a killer. Blovie did it a couple of years ago and still hasn't forgiven the friend who promised him "an easy ride along the Hudson."

 

Several weeks ago they were handing out at the greenmarket the NY Cycling Map which maps out all the bike routes in the five boroughs. It looks like it could be a good planning tool.

 

I think we're talking about the same hill-- there's a police station at the top. I think people always call it River Rd, but looking at Google Maps I see it described there as Henry Hudson Drive.

 

Usually I go with my friend Greg, who lives in the West Village. Starting from his apartment up the West Side and over the GWB, down River Road/Henry Hudson Drive and back on 9W, it's 40 miles round trip, 50 if we go a little further down 9W over the New York state line to this deli in Piermont before we turn around. Once you get over that hill up to 9W, you know the rest is going to be okay, since the return trip is much easier than the way out, both in NJ and Manhattan.

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