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Working my way through some Indian recipes from a not very good book - an experiment in seeing what works and what doesn't. The night before last I turned my kitchen into a post-hurricane site with a

Ta. I must give this a try.

Thank you thank you. But doesn't everyone look better wearing a bath mat?

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Yesterday I made a bunch of salads. Like 5. For dinner we had 3 of them...

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Céleri rémoulade, classic macaroni salad, and shrimp salad  (on a toasted Martin's). A fair use of Duke's.

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Friday night dinner -

Seared tuna (I need work with the sesame coating, most of it ended up on the griddle)
Quinoa with ramps and asparagus
New broccoli rabe, shallots and butternut squash - sautéed.

Buttermilk biscuits with roasted rhubarb for dessert.

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White asparagus with crisped breadcrumbs and brown butter. Boiled new potatoes. Serrano ham. Strawberries for dessert. 
 

Re white asparagus vs. green: much more sensitive in terms of needing to be fresh. (in Germany either the very local (1 hour drive max) product is available, or nothing at all. Second thing is you need to peel and trim it relentlessly, and cook it much longer that the green but I think most people who would read this type of forum know that by now. 

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I cook asparagus, green or white, peeled and trimmed, in 3/4 inch of water in a frying pan.    They cook to tender-crisp in several minutes, then ice bath.    Perfect, unless you're Sneak.    This method also seems to revive less then squeaky-fresh product.   

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11 hours ago, Behemoth said:

Re white asparagus vs. green: much more sensitive in terms of needing to be fresh. (in Germany either the very local (1 hour drive max) product is available, or nothing at all. Second thing is you need to peel and trim it relentlessly, and cook it much longer that the green but I think most people who would read this type of forum know that by now. 

I agree - and the peeling/trimming was done...relentlessly. Added the peels and trimmings to the quart of spargel poaching liquid Erwin from Katja had given to me  - little did I know that it has sugar in it!

2 hours ago, voyager said:

I cook asparagus, green or white, peeled and trimmed, in 3/4 inch of water in a frying pan.    They cook to tender-crisp in several minutes, then ice bath.    Perfect, unless you're Sneak.    This method also seems to revive less then squeaky-fresh product.   

I don't think anything revives truly old vegetables in terms of their freshness; sure, they're usable for soup, or for cooking A LOT (think green beans past their prime, braised for hours). But when  I peel nice, decently fresh asparagus (cuz I peel ALL asparagus), it's juicy. The spargel was barely.

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 I agree on juicy asparagus or vegetables in general.   Maybe we're talking different ages of veg.   With asparagus, I go by the appearance/texture of the bottom of the stalk.    I'm talking about good product that sidetracked in your vegetable crisper, like when you bought too much and held half for a couple of days.

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Yesterday's dinner: mussels prepared with white wine, tomatoes, oregano, and garlic. Sourdough baguette on the side.

Tonight's dinner: French-inspired white beans (RG Marcellas) with sage. Regular baguette on the side

To drink with both: Husch Vineyards 2019 Chenin Blanc.  They're based in Philo, CA; I think we were gifted this bottle as an anniversary present by the B&B in Mendocino we stayed at last year.

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8 hours ago, StephanieL said:

Yesterday's dinner: mussels prepared with white wine, tomatoes, oregano, and garlic. Sourdough baguette on the side.

Tonight's dinner: French-inspired white beans (RG Marcellas) with sage. Regular baguette on the side.

That sounds great. I need to do mussels again soon.
 

Beans have been too hit or miss to plan around, but inventory seems to be fresher now so maybe I give it another shot. 

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Husband: "One of these nights can you make a vegetable soup?" 

Me;  "...with corn bread."

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And, again for me, cornbread and buttermilk for breakfast.

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I don't remember where I first heard about this, but, given good buttermilk, it's excellent.

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