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so the iSi is working out fine I see.  Fun.

 

did you actually have it para el dia like Adrià recommended?  ;)

Para todo el dia, you mean? No, that's the mojito, for which I still haven't seen the recipe. Ahem.

 

This one requires the whipper to be kept in a bain marie, so it's not really suited to on-demand drinking.

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Working my way through some Indian recipes from a not very good book - an experiment in seeing what works and what doesn't. The night before last I turned my kitchen into a post-hurricane site with a

Ta. I must give this a try.

Thank you thank you. But doesn't everyone look better wearing a bath mat?

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Because of the mexican dinner yesterday the traditional dumpling sat night happened tonight:

the filling for potstickers was of chinese leeks (brought them from jersey) and beef. Usually we add some pork fat but the beef cut we got was very fatty and we decided to give all beef filling a try. The resulting potstickers were very good - juicy and beefy with no need for a dipping sauce.

On the side was an impromptu salad of grilled japanese eggplants and chipotle chiles.

And also mango salsa, a tasty leftover from yesterday.

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We did a Franny's-inspired dinner: linguine with the clam sauce they put on their pizza, along with their Brussels sprouts preparation (roasted with olive oil, tossed with lemon juice, covered with Pecorino Toscano - should have had roasted walnuts, too, but we were out).  Followed by a radicchio and parsley salad and some Humbolt Fog, then roasted pears and ice cream and a not very good cream cheese and chocolate brownie from Margaret Palca.  I've yet to be impressed by the baked goods from there.

The creamy, garlicky clam sauce is soooo good on linguine. And those brussels sprouts were great. I also loved the salad. But not the brownie. ;) As I think we were discussing about dessert items in general, too sweet.

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Wilfrid's recipe. ;)

 

Ingredients included pork, paprika, red onions, sauerkraut, sour cream and a dash of wine. And some cubed potatoes.

 

Tastes fine, but I got in too late to really want a heavy meal.

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Yesterday I made what is alleged to be my great-grandmother's recipe for pot roast. I got the recipe from my aunt and one of the ingredients is dried porcini, which I did get my aunt to confess was a refinement she added. It also calls for tomatoes, onions, red wine, tomato paste, beef stock and carrots and it was really good. I thought that with 4 pounds of brisket I would have leftovers but the ravenous beasts I was feeding had other ideas. Four adults and a child ate the whole thing.

 

I also, I suppose inspired by the fact that it had just been St. Patrick's Day, tried to recreate colcannon, a dish I'd had in Ireland and loved. Cabbage sauteed in bacon fat, mixed into mashed potatoes. Yum, but not a patch on that I was served in Shanagarry a couple of years ago.

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so the iSi is working out fine I see.  Fun.

 

did you actually have it para el dia like Adrià recommended?  ;)

Para todo el dia, you mean? No, that's the mojito, for which I still haven't seen the recipe. Ahem.

pour toute la journée, yep, that's what I meant to say.

 

as soon as the book emerges out of one of the countless boxes helpfully labeled 'books' I shall copy it for you.

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Keema, from Julie Sahni's Introduction to Indian Cooking. It's a stew with ground beef, tomatoes, peas, onions, garlic, and a lot of spices. I had it with basmati rice on the side.

How is that book? I've been meaning to learn how to cook Indian food and not quite sure where to start. Would that book be a good reference for someone completely green when it comes to Indian cooking?

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Keema, from Julie Sahni's Introduction to Indian Cooking.  It's a stew with ground beef, tomatoes, peas, onions, garlic, and a lot of spices.  I had it with basmati rice on the side.

How is that book? I've been meaning to learn how to cook Indian food and not quite sure where to start. Would that book be a good reference for someone completely green when it comes to Indian cooking?

I'll be honest: I don't actually own it. I used a recipe from the book that was reprinted in a newspaper. I will say that the recipe was pretty easy.

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Keema, from Julie Sahni's Introduction to Indian Cooking.  It's a stew with ground beef, tomatoes, peas, onions, garlic, and a lot of spices.  I had it with basmati rice on the side.

How is that book? I've been meaning to learn how to cook Indian food and not quite sure where to start. Would that book be a good reference for someone completely green when it comes to Indian cooking?

Get yourself Madhur Jaffrey's An Invitation to Indian Cooking. My first Indian cookbook, and still among my favorites. I've cooked my way up and down that book many times. You'll enjoy it, and you'll get great results.

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Seconded. Sahni's recipes always seem under seasoned to me. She may have dumbed them down for an American audience whereas Jaffrey was primarily writing for Brits who, at least at the time, were more accustomed to spicy food. Though for all I know, Sahni's recipes may be more authentic and Jaffrey spiced hers up for the British palate.

 

Edit: I also like the new pink Jaffrey.

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Keema, from Julie Sahni's Introduction to Indian Cooking.  It's a stew with ground beef, tomatoes, peas, onions, garlic, and a lot of spices.  I had it with basmati rice on the side.

How is that book? I've been meaning to learn how to cook Indian food and not quite sure where to start. Would that book be a good reference for someone completely green when it comes to Indian cooking?

the best place to start would be here.

 

or here for a cookbook list. and here.

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the best place to start would be here.

 

or here for a cookbook list. and here.

Thank you professor Jones, but I must say you have misunderestimated how clueless I am when it comes to cooking Indian food.

 

I grew up in Asia but Indian food has never been particularly popular in Thailand. What little I know of it came from eating at the Tayyab with Tuckerman and his beloved, and at Shalimar with my friend Malik. I never order at these two places. I sit down and food magically appears, always. I am beyond clueless.

 

I don't think I should worry about the Punjabification of anything at this point..so basically the discussion over on that forum just went w-h-o-o-s-h over my head.

 

I'm looking for Indian cooking 101, while not exactly Indian Cooking for Idiots. You know, the recipes don't have to be easy, I can deal with complicated stuff, but I would appreciate a bit more detailed explanation and step by step instructions.

 

A tiny bit of overview of the differences between types of food or regional cooking etc wouldn't be too bad either.

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