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Picked up a veal flank today at WF. never seen this before. It's about 1/2 inch thick and grained much like a beef flank steak, but smaller.

 

Thought about grilling it quickly and serving with a sauce made from morels. Would pan searing be a better method for this guy? Should I pound it flat like a scallopine?

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Hmm. Research suggest that flank is sometimes an alternative name for breast, and sometimes refers to the cut from the belly of the animal slightly lower down than the breast.

 

Either way, if it cooks like breast than I think grilling it fast will leave it too tough. It's something for slow roasting, preferably stuffed and rolled.

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Hmm. Research suggest that flank is sometimes an alternative name for breast, and sometimes refers to the cut from the belly of the animal slightly lower down than the breast.

 

Either way, if it cooks like breast than I think grilling it fast will leave it too tough. It's something for slow roasting, preferably stuffed and rolled.

Aha, WF is playing the name game with their meats I see. If it is veal breast or breast-like then a slow cooking method is indeed in order. perhaps those morels will be put to better use in stuffing for rolling the meat around.

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Well, it turns out that this cut is from the veal leg. Brett Anderson, the talented food critic from the New Orleans Times Picayune, says thusly about it:

 

The veal flank, a seldom-seen cut more robust than a veal chop and less tough than regular beef flank,

 

Recipes recommend grilling.

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Ah, loose talk (which, of course, costs lives). The Canadian government opines:

 

"7. FLANK: means that portion of the SIDE which is separated from the FRONT, LEG and WHOLE LOIN as described in items 4, 5 and 6, respectively."

 

vea27.gif

 

Which only goes to show.

 

(http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/mcmancv/vea/vea27.gif)

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Guest Adam

Veal flank (eh, the flank that Wilfrid describes) is used to make a really delicious Argentinian dish. The flack is rolled around various ingredients, poached, then pressed and sliced. Is very pretty and tastes great. Will try to find out details.

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Guest Suzanne F

Adam, I believe you mean matambre.

 

The recipe in the Time-Life Foods of the World book has you

- butterfly the meat (in their instructions, 2 flank steaks for 8 to 10 servings);

- marinate it with wine vinegar, garlic, and thyme;

-open it out and cover with spinach leaves, carrots, hard-cooked eggs, onion rings, parsley, crushed pepper, and salt.

- Roll up tightly, tie, and poach.

 

They say you can serve it hot, or press and chill. (Sorry I don't have a link to a picture; it's quite lovely.)

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Guest Adam

The flank is basically the area between the shoulders and the hips.

 

In beef cuts it is the end of the belly close to the leg, the plate seperates the flank from the brisket. Flank steak is taken from the flank area and is a single muscle. It is used to make London broil in the US?

 

B%20Flank%20Stk.jpg

 

It looks like this, as you can see the fibres run the length of the steak, unlike most other steaks.

 

Maybe your butcher cuts the veal with the flank attached? On way to tell would be to look at what direction the fibres run. If it is a leg cross cut, it isn't what 90% of references mean by flank and also doesn't come from a region that would typically be called the flank, so I would be careful about what recipes you use.

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Thanks Adam. The beef flank in your pic is what I am accustomed to and is indeed what we sometimes call London Broil.

 

However, look at the veal cut marked "i" in the second picture in my post above. That is also called flank, and it comes from the hindquarter of the leg. What gives?

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Guest Adam

If you look at the site you took the images from here and look at the cut up veal calf on the left you can see that the flank cut is from the underside of the hind-quarter, which would be the back end of the belly or flank. The flank is probably associated with the hind-quarter cut and so I can see how it would be called a leg cut (sort of). So we are all talking about the same cut I think, except wilfrid who has given a diagram of showing the approximate position of the plate.

 

Actually, on second thoughts it could just be that they are taking the top muscle of the leg and calling that a flank cut and then calling the flank. In which case I think that this is not common usage.

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Guest Adam
Adam, I believe you mean matambre.

 

The recipe in the Time-Life Foods of the World book has you

- butterfly the meat (in their instructions, 2 flank steaks for 8 to 10 servings);

- marinate it with wine vinegar, garlic, and thyme;

-open it out and cover with spinach leaves, carrots, hard-cooked eggs, onion rings, parsley, crushed pepper, and salt.

- Roll up tightly, tie, and poach.

 

They say you can serve it hot, or press and chill. (Sorry I don't have a link to a picture; it's quite lovely.)

Ah the very one. Looks like this;

matambre.jpg

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Supermarkets play fast and loose with names for the sake of marketing.

 

Flank should be as Wilf, Adam and others have described. If some buthcers are marketing something from the leg well...::shrug::.

 

In general, even so called tender cuts from the leg will have a tendency to cook tough. Veal is *generally* too lean for hard grilling.

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