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garlic scapes


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Blanche them, rinse cool and throw them into the robocoupe(sp?) pour olive oil on them and tuck them in the fridge.

 

Then, how about a smear of this on piece of roasted salmon. Place on the side of any grilled meat-say, steak, lamb chops etc.

 

Or, make the authentic tuscan bruschetta - toast the bread, run a clove of fresh garlic over it, and finish wih a dribble of garlic scape mash and maldon salt.

 

Make an onion tart - alsace style - when the onions are about done, add the chopped scapes...mmm onion tart.

 

Hey- steak tartare with finely chopped scapes yummmmmmm

 

We think it's great in the watermelon feta salad.

 

Excellent for a variation of the insalata caprese.

 

Great in mashed potato - heck in mashed anything!

 

Ooooh the lovely french omelet...

 

ok that's a start

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My favorite thing to do with them is to roast them in a hot oven with asparagus spears. Toss them in some olive oil, dust with salt and pepper, and roast at 425 for 15 minutes or so. Sprinkle with a little fennel pollen and fleur de sel, and they're heavenly.

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My favorite thing to do with them is to roast them in a hot oven with asparagus spears. Toss them in some olive oil, dust with salt and pepper, and roast at 425 for 15 minutes or so. Sprinkle with a little fennel pollen and fleur de sel, and they're heavenly.

Yep. Or throw them on the grill so you don't have to heat up the kitchen.

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Simple stir-fry. I made some just a few days ago for a dinner with friends, found them at Tang Freres while shopping for other asian ingredients, and decided to do a stir-fry with a bit of prawns. It couldn't have been any simpler.

 

A little oil into a hot pan, throw in the scapes which have been cut up to about 2-inch pieces, toss around a bit until a little soft, then add a bunch of prawns, then a bit of fish sauce, stir some more until cooked. You can add a little chilli oil for a mini kick if you want, but you don't have to. It's really simple and lovely, the garlic scapes turn very mellow and even a little sweet, also retain a nice crunchy texture. Everyone seemed to love it. There's a photo of the dish on Clotilde's blog, Chocolate&Zucchini, I think.

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Blanche them, rinse cool and throw them into the robocoupe(sp?) pour olive oil on them and tuck them in the fridge.

 

Then, how about a smear of this on piece of roasted salmon. Place on the side of any grilled meat-say, steak, lamb chops etc.

 

What? Nooo don't blitz them! :o :o :o

 

The whole point about garlic scapes is the lovely meaty texture. Sort of like asparagus but better - has lovely bite without being either chewy or mushy. Why would you want to stick that through a robocoupe!!!

 

Just cut into two inch lengths and stir fry simply til done.

 

Absolutely unique. I am always amazed that chefs in London never use them.

 

J

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Thank you all for your suggestions...They were stir fried with baby bok choy..they were MUCH more intensely flavored than I expected them to be..not mellow, but strong garlic flavor...should I have blanched them first?

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Thank you all for your suggestions...They were stir fried with baby bok choy..they were MUCH more intensely flavored than I expected them to be..not mellow, but strong garlic flavor...should I have blanched them first?

no, but perhaps you should have stir fried them a tad longer.

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Is planting garlic as simple as sticking a clove in the ground? Is it too late?

1) Yes.

2) No. It's too early. Plant garlic like any other bulb – in the late fall. It needs a good chilling to initiate sprouting.

 

Factoid: If you refrigerate your garlic, you're encouraging it to sprout by giving it a false winter. Store your garlic in a cool, dark place, and it will reward you for your kindness. Our harvest from last summer – which I dug in early August – lasted until late January, still juicy and with no signs of green sprouts inside. Last November, we planted more than twice what we planted for last year's harvest, in hopes that it will get us through the year.

 

Love,

The Garlic Ho

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  • 1 year later...

the long, thin, twirly bits at the tops--also good or cut off and toss?

 

As long as they are still curly, they are wonderful. When they straighten out they begin to be tough and bitter.

 

I put them in salads, raw, kindof like chives.

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