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Last week, Norah Jones at the Hammersmith Apollo. I know, I know, and I was not sure why I'd booked even before it started. I mean, I've never bought the new album. But as I'm sure I bored everyone wi

Going to see the Finn brothers in Central Park this evening. I assumed it would have sold out, but I got a message pushing half price tickets which I couldn't resist. Think it will piss down?  

Saw the Cowboy Junkies again last night, in an ice cold Beacon Theater. They had to wind up a ninety minute set at 11pm - union rules - which is a pity, as I think the audience would have loved anoth

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It's the 50th anniversary of the long defunct Ash Grove, once home to many, many blues and folk artists. So we headed off to UCLA for a celebratory concert featuring Bernie Pearl, Barbara Dane, Dwight Trible, Bernice Reagon and the Freedom Singers, Taj Mahal, the Watts Prophets (funny, that sounds a little like a cappella hip hop), Michelle Shocked, John Hammond and a bunch of blues harp players. All hosted by Dr. Demento.

 

Since the night was not over, we then went to a rehearsal space in the industrial district of downtown (7th & Myers), where about 25 of us hung out in a 400 square foot space listening to Japanese rock provided by a bassist/singer, lead guitarist and a guy with two laptops full of beats, samples, etc. The rehearsal space is one of many honeycombed in a four story structure. You can cruise the halls and hear all kinds of stuff at all hours--if you can get someone to let you in.

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I was given a ticket to an open rehearsal of the NY Philharmonic, conducted by Charles Dutoit, with Andre Watts playing Beethoven's Piano Concerto, No. 1. The other pieces on the program were Mozart,

Overture to The Marriage of Figaro; Rachmaninoff, Symphonic Dances and Ravel, La Valse.

 

It's a concert and not. There was stopping and starting and repeating, with Dutoit talking to the musicians (but not so the audience could hear what he said.) The house lights stay on throughout and the musicians are dressed very casually. I was surprised to see that the audience (the house was very nearly full) was much more varied than I expected, with a wider age spread, made younger than the typical concert audience by the presence of many tourists who probably learned from a guidebook that this was a much cheaper way to hear the NY Philharmonic than going to an actual concert. The experience is quite different, without the edge that added edge that adrenaline adds to a real concert, even for a seasoned performer. Watts played beautifully, using the music, and turning the pages himself.

 

 

 

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From Hotpress:

 

All Tomorrow’s Parties set for September date in New York

 

My Bloody Valentine are to curate their own All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in Monticello, New York, which is about a hundred miles upstate from Manhattan.

 

Running from September 19 to 21, it features them, Built To Spill, Tortoise, Shellac, F*ck Buttons, The Meat Puppets, Mogwai, The Drones, Thurston Moore, Thee Silver Mount Zion Orchestra, Polvo – and possibly Gemma Hayes whose new album features Kevin Shields

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I was given a ticket to an open rehearsal of the NY Philharmonic, conducted by Charles Dutoit, with Andre Watts playing Beethoven's Piano Concerto, No. 1. The other pieces on the program were Mozart,

Overture to The Marriage of Figaro; Rachmaninoff, Symphonic Dances and Ravel, La Valse.

 

It's a concert and not. There was stopping and starting and repeating, with Dutoit talking to the musicians (but not so the audience could hear what he said.) The house lights stay on throughout and the musicians are dressed very casually. I was surprised to see that the audience (the house was very nearly full) was much more varied than I expected, with a wider age spread, made younger than the typical concert audience by the presence of many tourists who probably learned from a guidebook that this was a much cheaper way to hear the NY Philharmonic than going to an actual concert. The experience is quite different, without the edge that added edge that adrenaline adds to a real concert, even for a seasoned performer. Watts played beautifully, using the music, and turning the pages himself.

Watching rehearsals can be highly entertaining, especially if one then goes to see the concert. MrsSRD and I used to be 'Friends of the LSO' and regularly attended rehearsals; on one occasion the (guest) conductor spent ages getting the orchestra to play a particular passage in the way he wanted it, when it came to the concert the orchestra still played it their way. :rolleyes:

 

And although I mainly agree with the idea that the concert itself has more edge, we once heard Maxim Vengerov 'run through' the Tchaikovsky violin concerto in rehearsal, it was the most sublime experience of music in my life, and the orchestra obviously agreed, all chatter faded away, papers stopped being rustled, everything stopped for a few minutes. He played on and on, the whole concerto, not just his part, all on his own. The orchestra applauded for over three minutes when he finished, not something I've seen before or since, they usually just politely clap or tap their bows, but this was a complete ovation. The concert in the evening just didn't have that complete drowning in the music that Vengerov produced that morning.

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I was given a ticket to an open rehearsal of the NY Philharmonic, conducted by Charles Dutoit, with Andre Watts playing Beethoven's Piano Concerto, No. 1. The other pieces on the program were Mozart,

Overture to The Marriage of Figaro; Rachmaninoff, Symphonic Dances and Ravel, La Valse.

 

It's a concert and not. There was stopping and starting and repeating, with Dutoit talking to the musicians (but not so the audience could hear what he said.) The house lights stay on throughout and the musicians are dressed very casually. I was surprised to see that the audience (the house was very nearly full) was much more varied than I expected, with a wider age spread, made younger than the typical concert audience by the presence of many tourists who probably learned from a guidebook that this was a much cheaper way to hear the NY Philharmonic than going to an actual concert. The experience is quite different, without the edge that added edge that adrenaline adds to a real concert, even for a seasoned performer. Watts played beautifully, using the music, and turning the pages himself.

 

Probably the only thing I miss about working at the Music Center in Los Angeles. I would routinely grab my lunch and head to the performance hall to watch rehearsals; both the LA Symphony and the Opera. There is a camaraderie amongst the performers and a humor to both Essa-Pekka Salonen and Placido Domingo that never gets seen by the general public (oh yeah, and a tempter too -- but more rarely). There would be jokes and jibes as well as hard work but it was more interesting to watch them work through difficult passages and ultimately see (hear) how they would resolve problems in the production or score.

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Guest Aaron T

Saw the San Francisco stop of the Hotel Cafe tour earlier this month at the Great American Music Hall. The Hotel cafe is a small music venue in LA that has a lot of musicians perform regular sets, or residencies in their fancy term. For the past few years they have organized a tour of their regulars.

 

I went to see Cary Brothers, who you may know from his song Blue Eyes on the Garden State soundtrack. Other performers included Ingrid Michaelson (who has a song on a commercial that is constantly playing), Jim Bianco, Meiko, William Fitzsimmons, and a couple of others. I couldn't stand Jim Bianco and Ingrid was actually good, much better than I expected; she wore her hair in pigtails which was kind of fun.

 

Cary Brothers was great; he has a new album out. The format of the show was each performer got to sing a couple of songs and then the next one came up and so each performer got to come on the stage multiple times, but noone really played a real set. An ensemble feel.

 

I'd have preferred a Cary Brothers show without all this feel good, aren't we so cool and isn't it fun to tour with all of your friends BS. Some of the artists were a lot more talented than the others...

 

Cool venue; interesting location next to a show not suitable for families.

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Guest Aaron T

Death Cab for Cutie at the Fillmore on Wednesday 4/23/08. Ben Gibbard is awesome. The band put on a great show. Opening act was the Cave Singers, eh. But everything ran right on time - opening at at 8, headliner at 9. They played for a full 90 minutes straight ex 1 minute between main set and encore. It was unusual to see a band play their most recognizable songs during the middle of the set and not make you wait for the encore. I loved the performance of I Will Follow You Into the Dark. It was evident that Gibbard and the band were having such a good time and the audience was very enthusiastic, yet Gibbard was humble at the same time. No preening here. A lot of songs from their new album which drops in 2 weeks. Should be good; I'm looking forward to it. I couldn't believe how many songs they played, one after the other, tons.

 

It was impossible to get a cab afterwards, so I walked the ~30 minutes home.

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Kraftwerk in Denver.

 

Now I can't get SNL's old Sprockets skit with Dieter out of my head.

 

My better half said the show was "the best synchronized mouse-clicking I've ever seen." Which is slightly better than the Star-Tribune's take on the Minn. show: "...all the flair of a power-point presentation at a mortgage-foreclosure seminar..."

 

Linky

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Caliphone and Iron and Wine at the Vic. One of those shows where if you sneezed, someone in the audience would silently kick your ass.

 

Great description. That sort of reverence has no place at a live rock show.

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1964 The Tribute this evening. All early Beatles. Weird. The four guys look vaguely like their counterparts, only George looked about 70 close up (my friend and I went up to the stage and danced, just so I could get a closer look.) They've been doing this for 24 years. Their playing is pretty much flawless. I hadn't realized how many mini solos George had within all those songs and it was fun just to watch them perform and imagine what it must have been like to be at a real Beatles concert. The Ringo guy is a mouth breather.

 

The Paul clone played left handed. It was all kinda surreal.

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Kraftwerk in Denver.

 

Now I can't get SNL's old Sprockets skit with Dieter out of my head.

 

My better half said the show was "the best synchronized mouse-clicking I've ever seen." Which is slightly better than the Star-Tribune's take on the Minn. show: "...all the flair of a power-point presentation at a mortgage-foreclosure seminar..."

 

Linky

 

I'm jealous. Big Kraftwerk fan. Also, have you heard of Senor Coconut? They do astonishingly brilliant covers and their CD of Kraftwerk covers is worth a listen.

 

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Kraftwerk in Denver.

 

Now I can't get SNL's old Sprockets skit with Dieter out of my head.

 

My better half said the show was "the best synchronized mouse-clicking I've ever seen." Which is slightly better than the Star-Tribune's take on the Minn. show: "...all the flair of a power-point presentation at a mortgage-foreclosure seminar..."

 

Linky

They were fun at Alice Tully Hall one full moon night 30 or years back.

 

Nice to hear that their act hasn't lost any of the thrilling physicality & spectacle that made them legends. :lol:

 

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I went to my first club show in years last night. The Vancouver music scene pulled together for a music producer that was in a very life-altering accident in New York, Scott Harding. He unfortunately is still in hospital, has no insurance and is a parapalegic. Hit and run.....Very sad story. Anyhow, his friend put together this amazing list of Vancouver music talent to perform at the Commodore (a legendary venue around these parts). It was fantastic, with a few misses...Kinnie Starr was terrible! As were the Pointed Sticks, Vancouver's first big punk band. There really does come a point when you are just too old to be playing punk. Unfortunately it was bad enough to drive my friend and I out of there and we missed the big guys, Colin James, Barney Bentall...etc. But it was a fabulous show. I need to go see these shows more often. I forgot how much fun it is. Only downer is that my hearing is still shot.

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