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The farmers market thread


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New Hipsterdom doesn't have the same rules that Greenmarkets do; it's not part of that system. I don't know what its criteria are. So I'm guessing it can define "local" any way it likes. In this case, it definitely extended as far as the Finger Lakes. (Re distance: note that Consider Bardwell from Vermont and Toigo from Pennsylvania are from pretty far away, but are at Greenmarkets.)

 

But yes, Bread Alone, Hot Bread Kitchen, and Nordic Bread are also at Greenmarkets, as are a couple of the other regular stands (Queens Farm Museum and Rick's Picks).

Well bread at the greenmarkets already all violate the letter of the law on what is and what is not local. Unless I've missed the wheat farming district of the Hudson Valley.

 

It's not what we consider local; it's what GrowNYC says is within their radius for production, if not growing (assuming they do use that as a parameter). They're their markets, and their "law." If we could lure Liza back, she could probably give us a quick précis.

 

ETA: I know this sounds weird from me, having just complained about LPQ pretending to be a local bakery. But my objection to them was that they're actually international, not locally based. (And to BR Guest was that it's a restaurant group, not a producer that consumers can buy from directly.)

No - literally the wheat is not local. They bakers seem to get some special loophole - not only do they automatically get permitted to buy in their wheat, but they don't have to buy local wheat.

 

Like the won't allow an existing vendor to sell his whey to a pig farm next door, take the pigs and make salumi, but they'll allow a bread startup to buy commercial flour and make bread.

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I'll start the ball rolling with the fingerling potatoes I bought at Tompkins Square yesterday. I am very bad at remembering the names of stalls, but there are only half a dozen or so here (open Sund

They make Hooligan (full stop) which some might call stinky. And mean that as a compliment.

Well, we need a thread for the rest of the entire world outside NYC, so here ya go.   What did you get at your farmers market? What did you get in your CSA box? Either will do: post it here!

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I went to the New Amsterdam market today (and wow, that Fulton Street subway station is some mess!), and it was full of the sort of people you might expect--I ran into one of the former Marlow butchers who is now involved in something called Brooklyn Cured (lots of cured meats and charcuterie but of course) and Lockhart Steele was spied at the Luke's Lobster counter. Oh, and April Bloomfield, who's very nice and had just finished some demonstration where she'd been skinning and filleting fish. Today's market had a fishy theme and there were several purveyors there including Acme, a couple of guys from Long Island, and a fellow with a barrel of live tilapia one could fish out with a net. I am not making this up. Could not hang around to see how the tilapia were despatched because I was on a mission, a mission for Nordic Bread's whole wheat and rye ring. It was on my radar from several folks here, but I attended a cocktail thing last week where this bread was served and was so very impressed.

 

I walked home, thereby avoiding the dreadful snarl that is the station and enjoying this gorgeous day. Fulton and Front Streets to West Chelsea is a far piece and I was soon ravenous. A bit (actually about a quarter of the thing) of the Nordic bread and a glass of milk was the very thing. I think this bread with smoked fish or cheese and something stronger to drink, as I first sampled it, is even more delightful.

 

I also bought some sealed packages of smoked Alaskan wild salmon, King and Coho, from the Acme guy. They were inexpensive. Will report back.

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So glad you got the Nordic stuff. It's clear you understand good bread, and that is one of the best: chewy, tangy, delicious on its own and as a vehicle for butter and/or cheese. BTW, it holds really well--we've sometimes had it on the counter (well wrapped but still breathing) for up to 10 days, and it was fine. How we managed to keep it that long without snarfing it all up I don't remember.

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Got a couple of jonah crabs from the very friendly fishmongers (Gabe something), but Blue Moon really has them beat for fish (variety and prices, they seemed about as fresh). Also a smoked wild eel from the smoked eel guy.

 

There was a nice couple there selling sockeye salmon shares, which I'd probably buy but they only distribute them in early September and we won't be able to go through 12 lbs before we vanish for a couple of months. Maybe someone wants half?

 

http://www.redsalmon.com/shareinfobrooklyn.html

 

p.s. I thought I was imagining it, but there was something called Brooklyn Brine there and they were selling a "pickling kit" containing jars and salt for $29.95:

 

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/brooklyn-brine-pickling-kit/

 

Maybe they can team up with the Tilapia in a barrel operation.

 

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So glad you got the Nordic stuff. It's clear you understand good bread, and that is one of the best: chewy, tangy, delicious on its own and as a vehicle for butter and/or cheese. BTW, it holds really well--we've sometimes had it on the counter (well wrapped but still breathing) for up to 10 days, and it was fine. How we managed to keep it that long without snarfing it all up I don't remember.

It's almost fudgy, in both taste and texture, but then the sour tang cuts through the sweetness and the tough-ish (in a good way) crust offsets the softness of the crumb.

 

I've never had luck keeping bread for more than a couple-few days. It either gets so dried out and tough I just make it into toasts or breadcrumbs or it gets moldy. Sturdy breads like Sullivan's pugliese or sesamo, or Pan Quotidien's baguette freeze well. I'm betting the Nordic bread I froze will thaw sucessfully, and freezing it in portions and doling it out will keep me from looking like fat Betty Draper. :P

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So glad you got the Nordic stuff. It's clear you understand good bread, and that is one of the best: chewy, tangy, delicious on its own and as a vehicle for butter and/or cheese. BTW, it holds really well--we've sometimes had it on the counter (well wrapped but still breathing) for up to 10 days, and it was fine. How we managed to keep it that long without snarfing it all up I don't remember.

It's almost fudgy, in both taste and texture, but then the sour tang cuts through the sweetness and the tough-ish (in a good way) crust offsets the softness of the crumb.

 

I've never had luck keeping bread for more than a couple-few days. It either gets so dried out and tough I just make it into toasts or breadcrumbs or it gets moldy. Sturdy breads like Sullivan's pugliese or sesamo, or Pan Quotidien's baguette freeze well. I'm betting the Nordic bread I froze will thaw sucessfully, and freezing it in portions and doling it out will keep me from looking like fat Betty Draper. :P

 

Truly, whatever makes this stuff so tangy also keeps it from molding. And it doesn't dry out; we keep it in the paper bag inside a plastic zip-top. But yes, it freezes and thaws well, too. We've done that with the smaller rounds. We find it easiest to split before freezing, and then just pop it in the toaster oven to heat a bit or toast to crunchiness.

 

Just as well I didn't go get any today; Paul is away for a couple of days and I wouldn't trust myself with it in the house.:blush:

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Vegetables are coming in more and more!!!!!!!! :D :D :D :D

 

Yesterday Paul brought home tatsoi and golden chard.Today at Tribeca we got sugar snap peas, zucchini, and beets with gorgeous greens. (The guy at the stand asked if I wanted him to cut off the tops. :blink: Heavens, no!) And the greenhouse cherry tomatoes from Stokes are excellent.There were many other leafy greens--kales, collards, spinach, and beautiful lettuces--and lots of green garlic and garlic scapes, and of course all of Lani's exotic stuff. Had to keep reminding myself that we'll be having a couple of very quick dinners this week, and one out, so I shouldn't overbuy.

 

Strawberries are still pricey, but worth the splurge, mostly.

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[rant, based on my knee-jerk reaction, not on a careful count. Take it as you wish. Or not.]

 

My fears about and biases against New Hipsterdom seem to have been partially confirmed.

 

In particular, the fear that Robert LaValva really just wants it to be Smorgasburg West: Yet another fresh-food vendor is gone, leaving boutique producers and many ready-to-eat stands, including a relatively high proportion of instant-gratification stands that have nothing to do with the legitimate purpose of a public market (imo). Do Re Mi, the biggest fresh produce vendor, the one that had a large variety of vegetables and even some reasonable prices, told me they were informed late last Sunday night that they were not to return, in spite of having paid rent for the entire season. Since the reason I was told was given as hearsay, I can't repeat it. Yes, it was only from one party of the two, but it struck me as not well-founded business behavior. And possibly in violation of the market's by-laws, but the market people did not have their own clear presence, again, so there was no way to get their side. Why CB1 seems to have bought so much into LaValva's "vision" just mystifies me--or would if I didn't realize it is now top-heavy with neighborhood newcomers who pay outrageous amounts for their condos and rentals. Yes, I declare class warfare.

 

I'm not saying that the remaining fresh-food (including frozen whole meats) stands are unworthy of existing, but they are quite boutique-y and have much, much higher prices than what many who still live in the neighborhood can pay. Sure, the Wall-Street newcomers (and out-of-nabe visitors) don't seem to blink an eye, but I daresay the Southbridge folks and others of us who moved here long before those new residents "discovered" the area gasp at the prices.I don't deny the need for those micromanufacturers to have retail opportunities--an acquaintance has a twice-a-month stand--but who can feed a family only ice pops and pie pops and artisanal ketchup? Yes, I am guilty of NIMBY; we are still so desperate for reasonably priced fresh food in this area, I don't see that much value in having those artisans here.

 

I never imagined I'd have kind thoughts about the company that runs the SSSM market building, but at least they seem to have welcomed Do Re Mi, as well as one other former New Hipsterdom vendor.So we haven't lost them completely.

 

[/rant. I will not have time available to debate this issue with those of you who think it's a great market; I have to devote my time more productively, so I can buy what few items I can there.]

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my husband came back from the market with the same news Susanne reported about Do Re Mi farm. Strange that LaValva would not tell them why they are out, esp. since they have a signed contract and paid their fees upfront. Apparently he told them that he did not have to give a reason. glad they are still in the area as getting good produce down here is not easy and we buy from them every week.

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[/rant. I will not have time available to debate this issue with those of you who think it's a great market; I have to devote my time more productively, so I can buy what few items I can there.]

 

 

Nobody cares about your opinion on the purpose of a public market.

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my husband came back from the market with the same news Susanne reported about Do Re Me farm. Strange that LaValva would not tell them why they are out, esp. since they have a signed contract and paid their fees upfront. Apparently he told them that he did not have to give a reason. glad they are still in the area as getting good produce down here is not easy and we buy from them every week.

 

That is weird. I'll ask him next time I see him.

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[/rant. I will not have time available to debate this issue with those of you who think it's a great market; I have to devote my time more productively, so I can buy what few items I can there.]

 

 

Nobody cares about your opinion on the purpose of a public market.

 

Nor does anyone much care about your opinions. About anything.

 

:wub:

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