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banh cuon

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With a shopping friend, a return trip to Brighton/Sheepshead et al. was in order. As was lunch. At Varenichnaya.

 

I think they may have upped their game, since my last visit some 5 - 9 years ago.

 

Skewers of both pork and lamb - nicely cooked, nicely properly seasoned.  

 

Pelmeni (veal) and vareniki (mushroom/potato) - just great. I now have 50 of each in my freezer, though slightly different fillings.

 

But the thing that got me, the dish that I must make, was this...

 

i1UuQoB.jpg?1

 

Known here as Lagman A La Uzbekski, known and served in other places much differently (my research suggested) than at Varenichnaya, it was wonderful on a cold day. The soup itself, rich and delicious, with a nice hint of star anise, tender beef, bell peppers, and I don't know about potatoes, but maybe a little turnip or rutabaga. The noodle within? In true cross cultural fashion, actually a bucatini blanched and shocked prior and added to the soup at the last minute. But again, cooked properly - they were still very al dente. I'd go back for this alone.

 

As mentioned above, with any cross cultural dish, many variations of laghman exist; variations in ingredients and plating, and noodle, etc. Evidently, the traditional noodles are hand-pulled. 

 

https://silkroadchef.com/2015/01/10/uyghur-style-laghman-noodles/

 

https://valentinascorner.com/uzbek-lagman/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zR5aLXkqog

 

As always, Net Cost still a fascinating place.

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This is very much the way Lagman is served at the better bukharan jewish places, including the separately cooked pasta (egg noodles usually), although usually with no anise.

 

The recipe I have is:

 

2 lbs beef rib, cubed

Oil

4 lamb bones

1 sweet red pepper

1 green pepper

1 hot green pepper

1 head of garlic

5 oz green beans

1 eggplant

2 onions

4 tomatoes

2 Tbsp tomato paste

Dry chili flakes

2 liter water

egg noodles

scallions and cilantro for garnish

 

Make soup as expected, cook noodles, top soup with noodles, garnish

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This is very much the way Lagman is served at the better bukharan jewish places, including the separately cooked pasta (egg noodles usually), although usually with no anise.

 

The recipe I have is:

 

2 lbs beef rib, cubed

Oil

4 lamb bones

1 sweet red pepper

1 green pepper

1 hot green pepper

1 head of garlic

5 oz green beans

1 eggplant

2 onions

4 tomatoes

2 Tbsp tomato paste

Dry chili flakes

2 liter water

egg noodles

scallions and cilantro for garnish

 

Make soup as expected, cook noodles, top soup with noodles, garnish

Oh yeah - sounds great.

 

Is eggplant a classic ingredient in this?

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Fennel sounds likely.

 

Re eggplant - the veggies change with season and pricing, and often based on what else is being cooked, so e.g. if there's lamb with chickpeas some of them may find their way into the ramen.

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With a shopping friend, a return trip to Brighton/Sheepshead et al. was in order. As was lunch. At Varenichnaya.

 

I think they may have upped their game, since my last visit some 5 - 9 years ago.

 

Skewers of both pork and lamb - nicely cooked, nicely properly seasoned.  

 

Pelmeni (veal) and vareniki (mushroom/potato) - just great. I now have 50 of each in my freezer, though slightly different fillings.

 

But the thing that got me, the dish that I must make, was this...

 

i1UuQoB.jpg?1

 

Known here as Lagman A La Uzbekski, known and served in other places much differently (my research suggested) than at Varenichnaya, it was wonderful on a cold day. The soup itself, rich and delicious, with a nice hint of star anise, tender beef, bell peppers, and I don't know about potatoes, but maybe a little turnip or rutabaga. The noodle within? In true cross cultural fashion, actually a bucatini blanched and shocked prior and added to the soup at the last minute. But again, cooked properly - they were still very al dente. I'd go back for this alone.

 

As mentioned above, with any cross cultural dish, many variations of laghman exist; variations in ingredients and plating, and noodle, etc. Evidently, the traditional noodles are hand-pulled. 

 

https://silkroadchef.com/2015/01/10/uyghur-style-laghman-noodles/

 

https://valentinascorner.com/uzbek-lagman/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zR5aLXkqog

 

As always, Net Cost still a fascinating place.

I have been relegated to shopping friend.  The food was excellent, especially the soup, which was unexpected for both of us.

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