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GG Mora

You Learn Something New Every Day

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Wow. I have absolutely no idea what that means. Amazing.

 

I actually sometimes like liver flavors, but...

You have to try those two wines with a duck and/or goose liver pate. One taste is not nice, one is scrumptious.

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edit: dupe post, DOH!

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I actually sometimes like liver flavors, but...

You have to try those two wines with a duck and/or goose liver pate. One taste is not nice, one is scrumptious.

 

I think I get it. You mean you were eating some liver paté and had some chardonnay and some sauternes at the same time. That with the chardonnay, the paté tasted livery and with the sauternes it tasted buttery. Right?

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A pilot told me awhile back that very humid air is lighter and dry air is heavier, which is related to lift. It is confusing to me that humid air, which feels oppressive, is light but also more difficult to get lift in. Any pilots who know abou tthis?

Humid air feels more oppressive to you because it inhibits the ability of sweat to evaporate. Evaporation of sweat being what cools your body not the actual sweating itself. As a result you sit their with the sweat just hanging onto your skin and that oppressive feeling.

 

All other things being equal, humid air is less dense than dry air.

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Humid air feels more oppressive to you because it inhibits the ability of sweat to evaporate. Evaporation of sweat being what cools your body not the actual sweating itself. As a result you sit their with the sweat just hanging onto your skin and that oppressive feeling.

 

All other things being equal, humid air is less dense than dry air.

 

Thanks for that. I remembered something about lightness of humid air, and it being more difficult to take off in.

 

And check that MN. Pate, chard= ugh. Then Pate, sauternes= yum!

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What I learned today:

 

...meromictic lakes, which means that there is no fall and spring mixing of surface and bottom waters. Such lakes have a high potential for evidence of ancient plant and animal life.

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What I learned today:

...meromictic lakes, which means that there is no fall and spring mixing of surface and bottom waters. Such lakes have a high potential for evidence of ancient plant and animal life.

My first thought was, hmm, never heard of meromictic latkes before.

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Yes, a whole week in that tank. The sight was quite creepy to me. I think I'd have got the bends. Also, it's suggested he stayed in the tank this long to prepare for holding his breath; I'd have thought the ordeal would've weakened him.

 

 

Someone at Slate raised an interesting question...

 

We learned what Blaine consumed in the tank—sports drinks mixed with water, 10 to 12 times a day—but not how he eliminated it.

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I read that he said he'd had a catheter for urine and tight muscles for any other contingency. :lol:

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yup :lol:

 

He also spent the previous week eliminating solid waste from his system and consuming liquids so he would not have any poo in the pipes.

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