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Gosh, they are trying hard. It reminds me of the original menu at The Clocktower but with even more British-isms. No bubble & squeak.

Centuries ago, Fergus Henderson showed up for a chat on eGullet, and I think I observed that he was doing a very British kind of cooking which was an idea of what British people eat rather than what they actually eat.

And here we find “beef dripping fries” which I believe I last ate on Guernsey in 1984, and very brown and rich they were.

And we have “Yorkshires,” those bland batter puddings which added ballast to the Sunday roast.

Skirlie, a poor person’s filler I don’t think I’ve ever eaten.

”Traditional English trimmings” for the chicken? I have no idea. It might involve a sage stuffing, but otherwise I can only imagine a succession of limp vegetables.

At least it’s a long menu and there are things on it I’d order. But it’s a performance. No Heinz Salad Cream?

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Thought we needed a thread on places we walk by, places we hear about, places we want feedback on without starting a thread about it (yet)...   So last night we walked by Lure Fishbar. I love the l

Walked by that newish place Turquoise on E. 81. Nice fish menu - lots of whole fish, and meditarannean stuff. Not wacky expensive, believe it or not. If they do all the fish well, might be nice. N

I went a few months ago. I liked the wings; the potato mochi are good if you don't mind the typical mochi texture. They're served with a sweetish sauce and lots of butter. The place really is small

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42 minutes ago, Wilfrid said:

 

Centuries ago, Fergus Henderson showed up for a chat on eGullet, and I think I observed that he was doing a very British kind of cooking which was an idea of what British people eat rather than what they actually eat.

....

And we have “Yorkshires,” those bland batter puddings which added ballast to the Sunday roast.

 

If you look at the supposed classic foods of many developed countries, aren't they mired in mid-20th C?    Food middle-class people ate before women left the kitchen for the workplace and convenience foods came to the grocery shelf and  small town intersection?   So Fergus spoke to or from a bigone era, but not less authentic if historic.  

This we can argue, but insult our adopted Yorkshire and you've restarted the revolution.    On our holidays, we cook the roast in order to get drippings for the Yorkshire.   "And, Mom, for once will you make ENOUGH?!"

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No. That's kind of the point.  It's not actually historic.  At no point we're people eating his weird synthesis of what British food "was." That's also what's kind of fascinating about it's huge appeal and influence on the current scene.  He kinda sorta anglicized ingredient driven southern Europe food.

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2 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

Gosh, they are trying hard. It reminds me of the original menu at The Clocktower but with even more British-isms. No bubble & squeak.

Centuries ago, Fergus Henderson showed up for a chat on eGullet, and I think I observed that he was doing a very British kind of cooking which was an idea of what British people eat rather than what they actually eat.

And here we find “beef dripping fries” which I believe I last ate on Guernsey in 1984, and very brown and rich they were.

And we have “Yorkshires,” those bland batter puddings which added ballast to the Sunday roast.

Skirlie, a poor person’s filler I don’t think I’ve ever eaten.

”Traditional English trimmings” for the chicken? I have no idea. It might involve a sage stuffing, but otherwise I can only imagine a succession of limp vegetables.

At least it’s a long menu and there are things on it I’d order. But it’s a performance. No Heinz Salad Cream?

I thought the same as you but then I went and looked at the menu of the branch I ate at in London and more similar than I remembered.

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2 hours ago, Anthony Bonner said:

No. That's kind of the point.  It's not actually historic.  At no point we're people eating his weird synthesis of what British food "was." That's also what's kind of fascinating about it's huge appeal and influence on the current scene.  He kinda sorta anglicized ingredient driven southern Europe food.

Entirely agree. My parents and grandparents didn’t eat that food. Some elements of that food were of course eaten here and there in different parts of the country, but it was a fantasy of British food (not that it was bad to eat at all).

 

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7 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

I grew up with Yorkshire puddings and the only way you could get me to eat another one would be to stick a sausage in and call it toad in the hole and even then I’m not craving it.

 Many of us grew up with our mother's and grandmother's cooking, vowing to maybe never eat a matzo ball, gefilte fish or overcooked brisket again.

But then, you know what?  Good versions actually do exist, and do what they're meant to do. I didn't grow up with Yorkshire puddings, but I imagine a good version, soaking up some nice gravy with a great hunk of beef, can't be all that bad. 

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7 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

Entirely agree. My parents and grandparents didn’t eat that food. Some elements of that food were of course eaten here and there in different parts of the country, but it was a fantasy of British food (not that it was bad to eat at all).

 

I guess sort of like Chinese restaurants here are to people who grew up in China. Or even more specifically, how a restaurant like Rezdora might be to someone who grew up in Modena.

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2 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

 Many of us grew up with our mother's and grandmother's cooking, vowing to maybe never eat a matzo ball, gefilte fish or overcooked brisket again.

But then, you know what?  Good versions actually do exist, and do what they're meant to do. I didn't grow up with Yorkshire puddings, but I imagine a good version, soaking up some nice gravy with a great hunk of beef, can't be all that bad. 

Amen.   Good Yorkshire pudding, or at least the way I make it, is cooked  in a little roast drippings on the fond and tastes like roast cap;.   

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/9/2021 at 7:04 PM, joethefoodie said:

Hawksmoor. In that gorgeous building.

Going tomorrow. Lots of mains. Lots o' meat. Probably lots o' money.

I'm going in a couple weeks also.  I've been to the Seven Dials location and liked it a lot.

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12 hours ago, LiquidNY said:

I'm going in a couple weeks also.  I've been to the Seven Dials location and liked it a lot.

It was less money, and better, and more fun, than I expected. Seriously for a newly opened place, the staff was on it - and they were very well staffed. Maybe we'll start a thread about it - I was waiting to hear @Sneakeater's take on it. (It doesn't hurt that it's in a gorgeous space).

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  • 2 weeks later...

File under not so curious, after further investigation. I had hoped that Hakka Cuisine, in the old Fuleen space, might actually feature Hakka cuisine, or at least some notable Hakka dishes. You know, what with the name being “Hakka Cuisine” and all. 
 

What I wasn’t quite expecting was just the Hwa Yuan menu, right down to not even bothering to take Tang’s name off the signature dishes. Oh well. 

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