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if i were eating alone, i would eat comfortably. but what is considered appropriate when dining with family, guests, and other acquaintances was my question.

 

i prefer to eat certain things with chopsticks. it just seems better to have most asian foods that way; i don't know why. probably just me.

 

also, what is the deal with metal v.s. wooden chopsticks in a korean restaurant?

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if i were eating alone, i would eat comfortably. but what is considered appropriate when dining with family, guests, and other acquaintances was my question.

are these people korean? if so, follow their lead.

 

metal chopsticks are more formal. you pick at the banchan communally--it is usual to go straight from serving bowl/plate/grill to mouth and back again. try not to lick your chopsticks before thrusting them back into serving bowls/plates. again, probably more usual to eat rice with spoon but no one will look askance if you use chopsticks. keep in mind the adage about dogs walking on hind legs.

 

do you eat indian food by hand?

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actually i do. well, for the most part. i eat rice with a fork, but i always order extra roti, or naan, or my fave, aloo paratha, to eat things like lamb rogan josh, or veggie korma (is it kormo, or korma?). meats from the tandoor are also eaten by hand.

like i said, i don't know why, but it just seems better that way. i guess it's the adage " when in rome..."

 

oh, btw, thanks for the info mongo.

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oh, btw, thanks for the info mongo.

you're welcome. though i expect the resident koreans will all contradict me soon enough.

 

actually i do. well, for the most part. i eat rice with a fork, but i always order extra roti, or naan, or my fave, aloo paratha, to eat things like lamb rogan josh, or veggie korma (is it kormo, or korma?). meats from the tandoor are also eaten by hand.

like i said, i don't know why, but it just seems better that way. i guess it's the adage " when in rome..."

 

well, many indians eat these things with forks and spoons--especially in restaurants. and if you really wanted to eat "authentically" you'd eat everything by hand. you know you've graduated when you can go to a wedding and eat dal and rice off a banana leaf by hand without wasting a drop or getting anything on your clothes.

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For the most part, Korean restaurants are pretty informal. Nobody blinks an eye if kids are running around and nobody will care if you use chopsticks or a spoon to eat your rice. My mom used to tell me it's impolite to bring the rice bowl up to your mouth to eat it, but I've seen plenty of people do that at Korean restaurants as well.

 

Not that I think you're the type to do this, but the one thing I would advise against is sticking your chopsticks straight up into your bowl of rice. It's considered horrible manners to do so, since chopsticks straight up in a bowl of rice is how you make offerings to your dead ancestors.

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thanks ellen.

 

yes, i knew about the chopsticks. i promise not to make any offerings this week. :wub:

 

i just always wondered about the double, well, multiple dipping thing.

 

do you know the name of the steamed egg dish, served in a small crock, that is commonly served in korean bbq joints? sometimes, during very busy hours at the restaurant, the only ones who get it, and shiso leaves, are the ones who ask. i would like to ask for it by name to be polite.

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do you know the name of the steamed egg dish, served in a small crock, that is commonly served in korean bbq joints?

According to bbq monster:

 

the steamed egg dish is called gyeran-chim (keh-ran chim).
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scream, that looks fantastic.

 

i hope i'm not being too personal, but i was wondering if you could help me with some korean table manners, specifically at a bbq restaurant.

 

my wife and i are going friday to a korean bbq place, and i've always wondered about certain rules of etiquette.

 

how are the servings in the small dishes supposed to be shared? do you eat them by directly taking them from the dish to your mouth with chopsticks, or do you put a small amount on your tiny plate, one at a time to consume them. also are there different rules about this when dining with family and friends, as opposed to business associates?

 

kam sa ham ni dah, in advance.

In a more formal setting, say a business or diplomatic meal, the top weiner always picks up his spoon/chopsticks first and he/she gets the first taste of what's on the table.. In other words no one else touches the kimchi for instance until he has.

 

For dining more casually with family and friends this doesn't apply so much, but some people will wait for the eldest at the table. Some families don't care about table manners others do. My parents were quite strict about Korean table manners when I was growing. Korean table manners of course include things that might seem unappealing to other people. It's okay to chew with your mouth open for instance, slurp, etc...

 

Mongo and Ellen mentioned somethings already. Another thing is not to tap your chopsticks on the dishes or the table. Don't hog your favorite banchan although at a restaurant you can always ask for more and if are a guest at someone's home you will be offered more of your favorite dishes.

 

There are some other things. But whenever talk of table manners goes into greater detail it seems to me issues of class come up and feelings get hurt.

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thanks ellen.

 

yes, i knew about the chopsticks. i promise not to make any offerings this week. :wub:

 

i just always wondered about the double, well, multiple dipping thing.

 

do you know the name of the steamed egg dish, served in a small crock, that is commonly served in korean bbq joints? sometimes, during very busy hours at the restaurant, the only ones who get it, and shiso leaves, are the ones who ask. i would like to ask for it by name to be polite.

You pick up whatever morsel of banchan your chopsticks touch first. You're not supposed to forage with your chopsticks for your favorite bits.

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p10100014bj.jpg

 

Lunch at mom's yesterday.

Screamie, what a beautiful table of food that is. All of this food is for how many? I only see 2 sets of chopsticks. :wub:

 

edit to add: I just showed my husband this photo of your mom's lunch and he said he wished he could have been sitting at your table, too. ::we're envious:: emoticon!

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thank you daisy and scream.

 

i have quietly observed different behavio(u)rs amongst the other patrons of my favorite korean bbq restaurant, and was always curious as to the distinctions. my wife and i are usually the only non-asians when we have dined there. from appearances, probably the only non-koreans/korean-americans in the place; in fact, much of the signage on the walls is wholly in korean, so we were able to immerse ourselves in what i've found to be fascinating korean-american culture. i hope to travel to korea someday, as a friend and co-worker will be retiring in a few years and will be moving home, and has invited me to visit.

 

if anyone is looking for a good korean bbq joint, only a few minutes away from the george washington bridge, in palisades park, n.j. is a great place called so moon nan jib. there are a lot of korean restaurants in pal park, i've eaten in most, but this would be my recommendation. the service is unbelievable, the atmosphere a bit rushed and hectic, but the food is awesome.

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BuckyTom

 

If you like Korean food Seoul and Jeon Ju (almost everyone there with the same last name as my mom is a related to us, up until about 20 years ago it used to be the case that everyone was, but as an older relative of mine said, "some newbies are moving in") are the cities to go to in Korea. Pusan is fantastic for seafood as well. Seoul is a non-stop city, it's very easy to find good Korean food if you know what to look for. Generally speaking sticking with restaurants that specialize in certain dishes is a good idea.

 

Kyongju is a must if you're interested in Korean art and architecture. The city is sometimes called "Korea's museum without walls"

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