Jump to content

Korean cuisine


Recommended Posts

I'll answer some questions I was asked elsewhere.

 

Yes, people still make their own kanjang, gochujang and dwenjang. More so in rural areas. In urban areas alot of people simply do not have the space to make them. My generation of Korean women for the most part don't know how to make it. It's something we saw our mothers do a long time ago. The commercially prepared dwenjangs and gochujangs can be very good. Also there are smaller makers (dare I say artisanal? :wub: ) who produced excellent products. I do not know of a commercial Chosun kanjang that can begin to compare with a homemade version.

 

I wrote this about the three mother sauces on another forum

 

Kochujang is one of the mother sauces of Korean cooking. The other two are dwenjang and kanjang When homemade there is a process/method that produces all three from a base. Korean kanjang is also called Chosun kanjang. It's different from commercial soy sauce. My mother has a bottle of Chosun kanjang from a batch she made when we first immigrated to America. It's about 30 years old!

 

There is a shortcut method to making kochujang at home from Japanese miso paste. It produces a pretty tasty product, but it does not have the complexity and depth of flavor of homemade kochujang.

 

You can buy premade kochujang, it's readily available in Korean stores or online. For bibimbap I thin it down with a little rice wine vinegar and add a bit of sugar. If you thin the sauce down more, that's basically the sauce you get at Korean seafood restaurants.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 67
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Ludja asked about my homecooking.

 

 

I don't actually cook with my mom. She's very picky about how she prepares her food and everything in her kitchen has its precise place. I am there to assist her.

 

She loves my cooking, excpet Korean. It's good she says, very good BUT she can do it better. Yeah, mom is a bit competitive. Since her Korean cooking is great she'd rather have me prepare other types of dishes that she does not know how to make.

 

In my home these days it's about 60% Korean, 30% Algerian, 10% French or other. I give the kids a list of dishes and let them choose the menu.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not sure where I'll go with this thread. Posting on forums takes time away from actually posting recipes on the blog.

 

So far I've taken photos of the following recipes:

 

baechu kimchi

nengmyun ( restaurant photo, but I posted the hoeng hwe recipe, so I don't think it's neccessary to see how the noodles are boiled)

guchulpan

kimbap

japchae

bulgogi

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 years later...

Is freezing kimchee/kimchi really such a bad idea? It's the kind made from hakusai--Chinese cabbage?

 

I just spent a small fortune on some kimchi for my grandfather, and I'm going to be bringing it on a plane. I'm hoping to freeze it so it won't stink up my luggage too much.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is freezing kimchee/kimchi really such a bad idea? It's the kind made from hakusai--Chinese cabbage?

 

I just spent a small fortune on some kimchi for my grandfather, and I'm going to be bringing it on a plane. I'm hoping to freeze it so it won't stink up my luggage too much.

 

I forgot about this thread. This is the one that go me banned from eGullet. :lol:

 

Freezing kimchi is a bad idea if you don't know what you're doing and don't have the proper temp controls. My mother brought some almost frozen kimchi back from Seoul. She said it was frozen to mimic old fashioned "buried in the ground" winter kimchi, which very few people make these days. At least not in Seoul, because it's hard digging through concrete.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is freezing kimchee/kimchi really such a bad idea? It's the kind made from hakusai--Chinese cabbage?

 

I just spent a small fortune on some kimchi for my grandfather, and I'm going to be bringing it on a plane. I'm hoping to freeze it so it won't stink up my luggage too much.

 

I forgot about this thread. This is the one that go me banned from eGullet. :lol:

 

Freezing kimchi is a bad idea if you don't know what you're doing and don't have the proper temp controls. My mother brought some almost frozen kimchi back from Seoul. She said it was frozen to mimic old fashioned "buried in the ground" winter kimchi, which very few people make these days. At least not in Seoul, because it's hard digging through concrete.

 

Was that around the time a non-Korean person (with a Korean "best" friend) instructed you on the Korean etiquette of eating rice? I remember that discussion well. :lol:

 

I don't know what I'm doing, so I'll have to suffer the smell. I'm going wrap the plastic bags (they double bagged it) in aluminum foil and then put it in a thick plastic container and maybe wrap the container, too. Hopefully that will not only keep the smell away from my clothing, but prevent leakage all over my suitcase. I hope it doesn't stink up my fridge too much in the meantime.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Was that around the time a non-Korean person (with a Korean "best" friend) instructed you on the Korean etiquette of eating rice? I remember that discussion well. :lol:

 

I don't know what I'm doing, so I'll have to suffer the smell. I'm going wrap the plastic bags (they double bagged it) in aluminum foil and then put it in a thick plastic container and maybe wrap the container, too. Hopefully that will not only keep the smell away from my clothing, but prevent leakage all over my suitcase. I hope it doesn't stink up my fridge too much in the meantime.

 

Yeah, the etiquette stuff and the hounding. I had long forgotten about that. :lol:

 

Not sure how the foil will look when they scan through the machines. Asiana and Korean Air flights into LAX are filled with kimchi toting passengers. Wrapping it in several layers of plastic and tape seems to do the trick. My mom hasn't had a kimchi accident in several decades of flying. She brings back all kinds of pickles from Seoul.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Was that around the time a non-Korean person (with a Korean "best" friend) instructed you on the Korean etiquette of eating rice? I remember that discussion well. :lol:

 

I don't know what I'm doing, so I'll have to suffer the smell. I'm going wrap the plastic bags (they double bagged it) in aluminum foil and then put it in a thick plastic container and maybe wrap the container, too. Hopefully that will not only keep the smell away from my clothing, but prevent leakage all over my suitcase. I hope it doesn't stink up my fridge too much in the meantime.

 

Yeah, the etiquette stuff and the hounding. I had long forgotten about that. :lol:

 

Not sure how the foil will look when they scan through the machines. Asiana and Korean Air flights into LAX are filled with kimchi toting passengers. Wrapping it in several layers of plastic and tape seems to do the trick. My mom hasn't had a kimchi accident in several decades of flying. She brings back all kinds of pickles from Seoul.

 

Let's not be coy, Presantrin. I didn't "Instruct" anyone. I simply related my experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Was that around the time a non-Korean person (with a Korean "best" friend) instructed you on the Korean etiquette of eating rice? I remember that discussion well. :lol:

 

I don't know what I'm doing, so I'll have to suffer the smell. I'm going wrap the plastic bags (they double bagged it) in aluminum foil and then put it in a thick plastic container and maybe wrap the container, too. Hopefully that will not only keep the smell away from my clothing, but prevent leakage all over my suitcase. I hope it doesn't stink up my fridge too much in the meantime.

 

Yeah, the etiquette stuff and the hounding. I had long forgotten about that. :lol:

 

Not sure how the foil will look when they scan through the machines. Asiana and Korean Air flights into LAX are filled with kimchi toting passengers. Wrapping it in several layers of plastic and tape seems to do the trick. My mom hasn't had a kimchi accident in several decades of flying. She brings back all kinds of pickles from Seoul.

 

Let's not be coy, Presantrin. I didn't "Instruct" anyone. I simply related my experience.

 

I wasn't being coy; I actually thought it was FG. I do remember when reading it, I got the distinct impression of being "instructed". More "This is how it's done," than "This is what I heard." At least with the first assertion. It wasn't until later that "This is what my Korean best friend does" came in. I get that kind of "instruction" a lot regarding my own ethnicity/culture, so I know it well.

 

Here, I looked it up for you.

 

The main difference between Korean dining etiquette and that of other Asian countries is that you eat rice with a SPOON and you do not pick the bowl up.

 

And it's Prasantrin. If you're going to attempt to slap my wrist, at least have the courtesy to spell my name correctly.

 

Back to kimchee, I'd like to find a glass jar to hold it, but I fear the kimchee is too big. It's a big-ass Chinese cabbage. I'll collect more plastic bags from the grocery store, and use some packing tape to wrap it well. Or maybe get one of the big plastic umeshu-making jugs from the Y100 store. I once wrapped a whole salted threadfin in several layers of aluminum foil and brought it to Japan from Thailand. No one bothered with it, as far as I know, but I don't want to take any chances with my $25 kimchee.

 

Is homemade-style kimchee always so expensive? My original plan had been to buy the big plastic jug from Costco, and it's maybe half the price or less.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Glass jar for the flight? My mom always packs in plastic containers. The ones with the side locking lids are especially secure. I'm sure they have those in Japan.

 

I don't know what the going rates are for homemade kimchi. I know Japanese tourists in Korea buy a lot of kimchi, along with roasted seaweed, salted pollack roe, and marinated kalbi or bulgogi. I saw packaged products with Japanese writing on them at tourists spots. The prices were much higher than for the local market.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like I'll have to try Miga by my lonesome. Can't get anyone to go with me. I did get some bibim bap twice at a mom & pop place on Sansom Street in Center City. It was delish.

 

Does Korean cuisine have its own version of dumplings?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Does Korean cuisine have its own version of dumplings?

 

Mandoo (mandu). They're served boiled, shallow fried or steamed. We also have big Chinese-Korean steamed bun dumplings, some supermarkets in L.A. have specialty vendors that sell nothing but. Interestingly, I've heard that these dumplings are called Korean dumplings in parts of Russia because it's the Koreans who make them. In Korea it was almost always Chinese immigrants who made them. Go figure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...