Jump to content

Supper


small h

Recommended Posts

Mild souse on toast, cabbage with lardons. 

6373EAF3-4021-4685-AE6A-4E8AE5F3359F.jpegI am fond of souse, which is widely available in Harlem supermarkets, at least. But for a long time I believed I could treat it like scrapple. Slice it, gently warm it; or bread or flour it and fry it.

No.

If you do that, you get soup. Delicious, sticky soup, but soup. And I believe it is served that way in the Caribbean.

So why not just pay attention to how it is served where it is made? Sliced and served cold on crackers or toast. I like the hot toast option. 
 

:world-of-headcheese:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mrs. P made some awesome surf and turf with a Dartagnan double cut pork chop stuffed with bacon, apples, blue cheese, garlic, and shallots, and steamed Dungeness crab. She made roasted delicata squash drizzled with hot honey as a side dish. It all went great with an excellent cabernet.

CCD240E5-F8AE-4A74-AE93-9DB8883CA144.jpeg

0BE98747-D6CB-49CC-B1CE-E4E571A25521.jpeg

C8E04DA3-2440-4663-B396-138AB1D96634.jpeg

CF45139D-CBAC-430C-A742-E640000A741C.jpeg

21C6B29B-5EA5-40FC-82BD-63DA11CD72DE.jpeg

1D999D5E-4795-47E3-874B-BC4A513EE9FC.jpeg

CE932CAE-F34D-43EC-8670-ECEDC5249566.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After an extra special, especially delicious Christmas eve dinner at Foxface, Christmas night dinner meant some kitchen time for me.

IMG_1237.thumb.jpeg.4fea784e61114c10c130f59a378383f8.jpeg

I wanted to use the remainder of a chicken roasted a few nights prior.  In a sort of shepherd's pie, or as it might be known in France...

IMG_1241.thumb.jpeg.f91d1228ef4af09565b24e1840e795dc.jpeg

Parmentier.  Recipe above appears in the La Régalade Cookbook.

Prior to oven...

IMG_1238.thumb.jpeg.458d8acde2e8b3a1d3646a298ba1c7f8.jpeg

Post oven:

IMG_1240.thumb.jpeg.ae432cf913fa18fcbb4fce5098a9e1ee.jpeg

Other than burning the shit out of our mouths, it was pretty good.  Mashed potatoes were only made with butter and cream, no eggs or egg yolks, so probably would be a little tighter with the addition of yolks.

For those who care, Parmentier was a pretty cool character...

Quote

Parmentier then began a series of publicity stunts for which he remains notable today, hosting dinners at which potato dishes featured prominently and guests included Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier. He gave bouquets of potato blossoms to the king and queen, and surrounded his potato patch at Sablons with armed guards during the day to suggest valuable goods, withdrawing them at night so people could steal the potatoes (the same story exists in Germany about Frederick the Great). These 54 arpents of impoverished ground near Neuilly, west of Paris, had been allotted him by order of Louis XVI in 1787.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine-Augustin_Parmentier

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After a long day shopping for holiday menus I realized I needed to cover a solo dinner this week. I was in Essex Market so gambled on a larded quail from Ends Meats ($16.99 I think).

It was unusually good. A large, meaty bird, very juicy. I think the larding was pancetta rather than bacon. Would buy it again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Leftoverpalooza continues. The extra red pepper from the crudite and the extra basil from the Greek goddess dip went into this pesto sauce for shrimp. Balcony mustard greens are not technically left over, unless they're left over from summer, and sure, why not. With blue cheese vinaigrette.

dinner.jpg.f8eb52f291775b6a82a79149f6d59175.jpg

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday's baking projects meant might as well keep the oven going all day (there was a nice cross breeze cooling the kitchen).

IMG_1257.thumb.jpeg.8212480d9fc22cb05918aee38a320d76.jpeg

Overnight cure on the Hudson Valley duck legs, and then a couple of hours on low heat before crisping up the skin.

Duck fat roasted potatoes.  Bitter greens salad.

A bonus was the almost full cup of lovely duck fat spooned out of the baking dish during the first hour or so of low-heat roasting.

Edited by MitchW
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

We stayed home and had fancyfood: crab legs, oysters, caviar, etc. I made blini, which turned out to be a great way to use up the teff I have left over from my adventures in injera. There's leftover crab and caviar (and still more teff!), so tonight I think I'll do it all again.

IMG_2493.thumb.JPG.1229cd990056a778465ce17bb8404159.JPG

IMG_2497.thumb.JPG.c873fe9b0e3f8b5024c60d718362eb66.JPG

IMG_2502.thumb.JPG.f5b525a5848c4283d510c06907a030e5.JPG

 

Edited by small h
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...