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When I found myself with a three-car garage and but one car that sits in the driveway, I thought to myself, "hey, I could put a woodworking shop in here."

 

About $1,500 later, I've got lots of cool powertools, and I've started building stuff. I still need to drop another $1,000 - $1,500 to be really functional. I hope to make cabinets, coffee tables and stuff like that.

 

Anyone else work with wood?

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When I found myself with a three-car garage and but one car that sits in the driveway, I thought to myself, "hey, I could put a woodworking shop in here."   About $1,500 later, I've got lots of co

Very impressive, Stone.   I've always wanted a Nakashima. I think the pieces are more akin to sculpture than furniture. The prices are prohibitive now, of course. Why, oh why didn't my parents l

If you don't want to use plate joiners, dowels are a good alternative... and no templates.

Good for you, Stone!

 

I’ve been designing furniture for a while, but haven’t had the time or space to build much of it yet. My brother has a woodshop in the barn behind his house, so when we both have a bit of free time we work together. I've found Fine Woodworking magazine to be a great resource for construction and finishing techniques.

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That was my profession for 30 or so years. Let me know if you have any questions. :o

Yeah. What kind of table saw should I buy?

I've quickly realized that the table saw, planer and jointer are the onion, carrot and celery of the wood world. People tell me to look for deals on a used TS, but I'm worried since I don't know what the hell I'm looking at. I couldn't tell if it was in good condition or about to drop apart. I'm giving serious thought to a Grizzley, although Jet, Delta and GI are highly regarded.

 

I figure I wan't a contractor's saw, 2-3hp, with left tilt.

 

I'll probably drop the $500 for a Dewalt 13" planer, although I'm told to buy a $300 from Harbor Freight. Same with the jointer -- I'm told Harbor Frieght sells a reasonably priced and good 6" unit.

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Good for you, Stone!

 

I’ve been designing furniture for a while, but haven’t had the time or space to build much of it yet. My brother has a woodshop in the barn behind his house, so when we both have a bit of free time we work together. I've found Fine Woodworking magazine to be a great resource for construction and finishing techniques.

You're welcome to come by and show me how to save my fingers.

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Good for you, Stone!

 

I’ve been designing furniture for a while, but haven’t had the time or space to build much of it yet. My brother has a woodshop in the barn behind his house, so when we both have a bit of free time we work together. I've found Fine Woodworking magazine to be a great resource for construction and finishing techniques.

You're welcome to come by and show me how to save my fingers.

You could do the same thing I do: get someone else (my brother, in my case) to do all the scary stuff :o

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Delta unisaw is the standard of the industry but pricey. Last place I worked mine was 35 years old and going strong. Dewalt makes a nice 10" model DW746X for just under $1000. Best prices are found at ToolCrib at Amazon. I never used a joiner. A good blade and accurate fence will give you a good glueline. A drum sander is more useful than a planer (Delta 18X36). Get a Dewalt 12" double bevel sliding compound miter saw with a stand. Get a good router. I like Deltas with a pistol grip. I'd stay away from Harbor Freight.

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Get a Dewalt 12" double bevel sliding compound miter saw with a stand.

Got that. (No stand.) Got the Bosch jig. Got the PC router with fixed and plunge bases. I'm in the process of building a router cabinet. (Or a lopsided hung of scrap wood -- remains to be seen what the final product will be.)

 

Everything I read says that I will not be able to make decent furniture without a planer and jointer. I'm less concerned about the jointer -- I think I can use a flush-trim router bit to get a good glue line.

 

But my biggest problem seems to be finding wood in the right sizes. I guess and rip everything down on the TS, but I think a planer will be easier.

 

The TS choice is causing me much angst. I'm wavering between spending $5-600 on the TS (before tax, delivery) or $1K.

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Good for you, Stone!

 

I’ve been designing furniture for a while, but haven’t had the time or space to build much of it yet. My brother has a woodshop in the barn behind his house, so when we both have a bit of free time we work together. I've found Fine Woodworking magazine to be a great resource for construction and finishing techniques.

You're welcome to come by and show me how to save my fingers.

You could do the same thing I do: get someone else (my brother, in my case) to do all the scary stuff :o

If he's in Dutchess County, he's welcome to stop by. I'll make bbq.

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You're welcome to come by and show me how to save my fingers.

I can't believe that I didn't see this thread earlier! :rolleyes:

 

Not knowing your level of expertise:

For a table saw, the use of a featherboard and push sticks will help to save your fingers.

 

For routers, use tungsten-carbide (long lasting), chip-limitation-style bits (they're safer than regular bits). Choose bit bodies that have a non-stick coating to make resin removal easier.

 

When using edged power tools (saws & routers mostly), especially on softwoods, resins deposit behind the cutting edge. With continued use, the resin builds up and causes friction between the tool and the wood, resulting in the blade/bit getting hotter. TS blades can then warp and bits can fail. Both results of hot tools also cause your wood to burn. Use a resin remover.

 

 

So, did you get the table saw yet?

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Just got the TS up and running this weekend. It's great. I'm well on my way to building a coffee table. My problem is making mortises. I'm trying to avoid buying any more big tools for now -- so a mortiser is out of the question. I also want to avoid buying a $800 FMT. So I'm trying to make templates -- and they're a huge pain in the ass.

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When I had a house and a basement, i put in a wood shop with a good table saw, a drum sander, a router with a good router table, and an electric miter saw. After a while, I became a carpenter and built a wine cellar and some wood ceilings and did some shelving and storage in the garage.

 

Then I became a furniture maker and made a simply dandy work bench, large and very user friendly and fairly well-finished. I was going to try to become a cabinet maker but my wife rid the house of me before I had a chance, and I abandoned that trade.

 

Remember that really excellent hand tools are a pleasure to work with and necessary for the finest cabinetry. I'm thinking mainly of planes, saws, and chisels. The Brits and the Japanese make really elegant and serviceable hand tools, with Japanese saws being works of art as well as hard workers (but they are mostly backward, cutting on the pull rather than the push, and thus require some getting used to). (And the great Japanese cabinet makers like Koizumi wouldn't think of using power tools.)

 

Bon Chance, and strive for perfection.

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Just got the TS up and running this weekend. It's great. I'm well on my way to building a coffee table. My problem is making mortises. I'm trying to avoid buying any more big tools for now -- so a mortiser is out of the question. I also want to avoid buying a $800 FMT. So I'm trying to make templates -- and they're a huge pain in the ass.

Two words for you, Plate Joiner. In 30 years of doing this I have never cut a mortise or a tenon. Dowels or plates are all we used. Be a purist if you like but if the tools are available use them.

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