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Tamar G

Clueless questions II (The Ones You Really Want Answered)

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Next question: Why does hot liquid foam and bubble when you add salt to it?

Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

 

Chemicals volatizing from the salt because of temperature? (Guessing.)

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Next question: Why does hot liquid foam and bubble when you add salt to it?

Two possibilities spring to mind.

 

1) If the liquid is oil at a temperature above 100C, the bubbles might be from the vaporization of water that has been absorbed by the salt.

 

2) If the liquid is at boiling point, the salt crystals will act as seeds for the formation of bubbles of vapor.

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why is meat not cooked very long called "rare" when all the other grades are more directly descriptive?

Call yourself an academic and you can't use a dictionary?

 

It's a corruption of rear meaning underdone from the old English hrér.

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why is meat not cooked very long called "rare" when all the other grades are more directly descriptive?

Call yourself an academic and you can't use a dictionary?

 

It's a corruption of rear meaning underdone from the old English hrér.

deek-shun-urry? what is that?

 

so have "medium" and "well done" always been "medium" and "well done"? or has only "rare" survived? and if so, why? you have 3 minutes.

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I know why it's called "love" in tennis, if that helps.

i do too! are you hot? do you want to cyber?

 

god, it's a slow day on all the sites i visit.

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so have "medium" and "well done" always been "medium" and "well done"? or has only "rare" survived? and if so, why? you have 3 minutes.

The finest steaks were originally prepared by specially trained psychics: hence, "medium". But since they knew in advance how much a customer would tip, the level of service proved inconsistent, and the practice died out.

 

"Well done" is a joke, of course.

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why is meat not cooked very long called "rare" when all the other grades are more directly descriptive?

Call yourself an academic and you can't use a dictionary?

 

It's a corruption of rear meaning underdone from the old English hrér.

deek-shun-urry? what is that?

 

so have "medium" and "well done" always been "medium" and "well done"? or has only "rare" survived? and if so, why? you have 3 minutes.

It just occurred to me that the etymology of raw must be similar. I was, of course, correct: old English hréaw. And the reason for the survival of 'rare' is surely that 'raw' sounds very unappetizing.

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I am surprised the old English had much use for a word for "underdone".

 

"How would you like your oxen, Caractacus?"

 

"Underdone is fine, thanks, Catweazle."

 

"Not raw?"

 

"No, just slightly underdone is fine."

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Next question: Why does hot liquid foam and bubble when you add salt to it?

Two possibilities spring to mind.

 

1) If the liquid is oil at a temperature above 100C, the bubbles might be from the vaporization of water that has been absorbed by the salt.

 

2) If the liquid is at boiling point, the salt crystals will act as seeds for the formation of bubbles of vapor.

I buy #2 for when I add salt to boiling water, and #1 might explain why the hot (not boiling) cup of chicken broth I added salt to this afternoon got a layer of little white bubbles. There's some fat in the broth.

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Next question: Why does hot liquid foam and bubble when you add salt to it?

Two possibilities spring to mind.

 

1) If the liquid is oil at a temperature above 100C, the bubbles might be from the vaporization of water that has been absorbed by the salt.

 

2) If the liquid is at boiling point, the salt crystals will act as seeds for the formation of bubbles of vapor.

In which case, couscous, polenta or oatmeal will do just as well.*

 

 

*Trust me on this.

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Guest Suzanne F

Today, Wednesday, September 28, is "Ask a stupid question" Day. Carry on.

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