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Clueless questions II (The Ones You Really Want Answered)


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The Zahav hummus (and tahina) are the best I have ever made. The infusing the lemon juice with the garlic gives it a nice garlicky flavor but without the sharpness that garlic usually adds. Second best hummus was the recipe from Falastin. (I make a lot of hummus). Solomonov has a "quick hummus" recipe in Israel Soul, but I haven't tried it.

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4 minutes ago, bloviatrix said:

The Zahav hummus (and tahina) are the best I have ever made. The infusing the lemon juice with the garlic gives it a nice garlicky flavor but without the sharpness that garlic usually adds. 

Totally agree, and it also stays at the same level of garlicky after a day in the fridge. 

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I blanch the garlic if it's too strong, and I include most of it in a lemon+garlic+chili+salt+parsley+cumin topping so it can be added at the last moment instead of sitting in the tahini and becoming increasingly stinky. 

Also I peel the chickpeas and grind them in a meat grinder as the skins aren't good for anything and so as to get less air in there than a blender would. Of course the vitamix / blender version can be very good if the skins aren't too thick. 

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49 minutes ago, Orik said:

I blanch the garlic if it's too strong, and I include most of it in a lemon+garlic+chili+salt+parsley+cumin topping so it can be added at the last moment instead of sitting in the tahini and becoming increasingly stinky. 

Also I peel the chickpeas and grind them in a meat grinder as the skins aren't good for anything and so as to get less air in there than a blender would. Of course the vitamix / blender version can be very good if the skins aren't too thick. 

I've taken to adding baking soda to both the soaking water and the water I boil the chickpeas in. It definitely helps to soften the skins if you're too lazy to peel.

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Of course. My trick for peeling is to cook them until a few skins come off, then reserve some of the cooking water and replace with cold water, and just rub the chickpeas underwater. You can get about 75% of the skins off and floating this way, and then finish cooking with relatively little water until very soft. I've seen palestinian cooks roll chickpeas between two towels and then return them to the water with similar effect (and I guess better water and energy efficiency). 

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3 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

Another aggregation of words that I'm having trouble making sense of as a unit.

A number of years ago, Film Forum screened "Garlic is Better Than Ten Mothers" and roasted garlic as the movie was playing.  Naturally, N and I had to get something with garlic right afterwards.  We ended up at Bleecker Street Pizza on 7th Avenue and Bleecker, where their "garlic bread" was essentially raw chopped garlic sprinkled over toasted plain Italian bread.  No butter on the bread, even.  THAT was strong, strong stuff.

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2 hours ago, Orik said:

Of course. My trick for peeling is to cook them until a few skins come off, then reserve some of the cooking water and replace with cold water, and just rub the chickpeas underwater. You can get about 75% of the skins off and floating this way, and then finish cooking with relatively little water until very soft. I've seen palestinian cooks roll chickpeas between two towels and then return them to the water with similar effect (and I guess better water and energy efficiency). 

The hazelnut rub-between-two-towels trick for skinning!

I'm a fan of underwater peeling and floating;  I also do it with cornmeal (putting the cornmeal in a bowl of water and removing what floats up - a Sean Brock teaching).

Once again, Rancho Gordos' chickpeas are the bomb.

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