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Were your premium darjeelings labeled with the name of the estate it came from?  Someone at Peet's once tried to sell me "premium first flush darjeeling" without telling me where it came from, "urr...India?" was the answer.

 

Selling generic First Flush is, to me at least, like selling generic First Growth Bordeaux.....really, it came from Bordeaux, but we are just not gonna tell you what chateau....

 

heh.

what do you know, they have a website. prices in dollars are quite a bit higher than in rupees in delhi. i've had excellent tea purchased from these folks before. it is possible that this bag of first flush is just a little old.

 

as for not labelling estate names, i suspect this isn't such a big deal in india, at least for tea sold to indian consumers. other than at the extreme high end it is probably only beginning to happen now as people realize that tea snobs in the west are willing to pay a premium for terroir and packaging.

 

edit: and for those who want to buy directly from the famous makaibari estate. note: the prices listed are by kg but they sell in much smaller weights as well.

Edited by mongo_jones
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I have tea every day of my life. I've been drinking it since I was seven years old, despite having grown up in a family of coffee drinkers. I don't have the world's biggest collection, but I do have s

what do you know, they have a website. prices in dollars are quite a bit higher than in rupees in delhi. i've had excellent tea purchased from these folks before. it is possible that this bag of first

A nice blog about tea.

as for not labelling estate names, i suspect this isn't such a big deal in india, at least for tea sold to indian consumers. other than at the extreme high end it is probably only beginning to happen now as people realize that tea snobs in the west are willing to pay a premium for terroir and packaging.

 

edit: and for those who want to buy directly from the famous makaibari estate. note: the prices listed are by kg but they sell in much smaller weights as well.

Some tea snobs in the west are buying them in paper bags honey. It's not about packaging. Most teas that come in pretty packaging are not all that good. The real stuff is sold in bulk, not prepackaged.

 

On the issue of labelling the estate name, it's just a matter of knowing where your tea comes from. The website of your friend's company made a point of warning the consumers that many teas that are labelled "Darjeeling" don't come from Darjeeling at all, so certainly knowing where your tea actually comes form is not entirely a bad thing, no? Also, not all tea plantations are created equal. Growing/fermenting practice and site location and elevation will affect the resulting tea. Knowing where your particular tea comes from means that you, not some dodgy tea merchants, are the one making the choice.

 

Heck I even know where my tomatoes come from, if that's being snob then..boo.. :o

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edit: and for those who want to buy directly from the famous makaibari estate. note: the prices listed are by kg but they sell in much smaller weights as well.

Excellent estate, biodynamic besides. Their First Flush tends to be more astringent than, say, North Tukvar's, but the fragrant is supremely heady.

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Some tea snobs in the west are buying them in paper bags honey.  It's not about packaging.  Most teas that come in pretty packaging are not all that good.  The real stuff is sold in bulk, not prepackaged.

honey?

 

i wasn't suggesting anything about you or any other tea snobs that you might know--just making a general point about the dynamics of the higher end tea business (gleaned as it happens from friends whose families are in the tea-trade).

 

 

On the issue of labelling the estate name, it's just a matter of knowing where your tea comes from.  The website of your friend's company made a point of warning the consumers that many teas that are labelled "Darjeeling" don't come from Darjeeling at all, so certainly knowing where your tea actually comes form is not entirely a bad thing, no?  Also, not all tea plantations are created equal.  Growing/fermenting practice and site location and elevation will affect the resulting tea.  Knowing where your particular tea comes from means that you, not some dodgy tea merchants, are the one making the choice.

 

Heck I even know where my tomatoes come from, if that's being snob then..boo.. :o

 

nor did i suggest that there's anything wrong with knowing where your tea comes from. merely speculated that this may be a relatively new development. and in the indian market not as much of a consideration. and sometimes in india--though i have no information to suggest that this is true of the high-end tea trade--what it says on the package can be more in the "nice to read" category.

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Some tea snobs in the west [care not a jot for the packaging, just about where the tea was grown].  [i like to know where my tea comes from.] . . . .  Heck I even know where my tomatoes come from; if that's being snob then . . . boo . . . .  :o

Ah, Chere Pim--

 

You're a tea terroir terror and tea snob tres sympa. But where are them tomatoes from?

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But where are them tomatoes from?

Dirty Girl Produce (just off Highway Nine, in downtown Santa Cruz)...quite a pretty little farm, and quite a pretty farmer (Joe Schirmer).

 

I sure know where all of my tomatoes come from, too: Joe and Greg and Kirsten and Jasmine and Thom and another Joe, Rubin). I like to spread the love around.

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Do they sell those German giant sachets around here? I usually bring them with me from Germany for my mom, who makes great iced teas from various stuff in her herb garden. But sometimes I forget to pack them...:wub:

 

I use the bodum plunger thing. We have two now that we combined households. I like a nice big pot of tea, and I have a tea-light holder to keep it warm. The best thing is the candle looks nice and cozy on the coffee table when I am working.

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reading up on tea several years back, i was speaking with a friend about some tea facts. ignorantly, i said to him, "did you know that almost all teas come from the same plant?"

he replied "man, that must be a big plant!!!"

 

of course, i was referring to camelia sinensis.

 

it has been mentioned on this forum before, but i like the green teas from harney and sons. www.harney.com

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Guest Suzanne F
I use the bodum plunger thing. We have two now that we combined households. I like a nice big pot of tea, and I have a tea-light holder to keep it warm. The best thing is the candle looks nice and cozy on the coffee table when I am working.

We make a big (more than 40-ounce) pot (English brown betty-type) and transfer most of it to a 1-liter thermos bottle. Keeps it hot all day without "cooking" it any more.

 

On a sad note: the tea shop I mentioned near me closed and turned into a coffee place. :lol: So now I've got to find other decent purveyors, uptown. :wub:

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I can't get enough of Genmaicha (I think that's what it's called), at the moment. It's the japanese green tea with roasted rice. The flavour is very round and I find it a huge pick-me-up. Tea with carbs - what's not to like?

 

As I tend to make it in a cup, I have one of those devices that looks like an upside down witches hat, that sits on the rim. Seems to work very well, and I have a nice little ritual involving a 'special' spoon to measure out the tea etc.

 

What do people think about the tea that's made in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony? I was at the V & A museum a few years ago when they were doing a demonstration and asked for volunteers to be the 'guests'. After kicking a few children out of the way, I managed to volunteer, and found the tea quite strange - I think because the tea leaves, are minced rather finely and incorporated in the water.

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Do they sell those German giant sachets around here? I usually bring them with me from Germany for my mom, who makes great iced teas from various stuff in her herb garden. But sometimes I forget to pack them...:wub:

 

I use the bodum plunger thing. We have two now that we combined households. I like a nice big pot of tea, and I have a tea-light holder to keep it warm. The best thing is the candle looks nice and cozy on the coffee table when I am working.

Do you mean the Finum filter bags? I love those. I get them at the T Salon in NYC, but I know they sell them online.

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I can't get enough of Genmaicha (I think that's what it's called), at the moment. It's the japanese green tea with roasted rice. The flavour is very round and I find it a huge pick-me-up. Tea with carbs - what's not to like?

 

As I tend to make it in a cup, I have one of those devices that looks like an upside down witches hat, that sits on the rim. Seems to work very well, and I have a nice little ritual involving a 'special' spoon to measure out the tea etc.

 

What do people think about the tea that's made in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony? I was at the V & A museum a few years ago when they were doing a demonstration and asked for volunteers to be the 'guests'. After kicking a few children out of the way, I managed to volunteer, and found the tea quite strange - I think because the tea leaves, are minced rather finely and incorporated in the water.

I love genmai cha as well as hoji and sencha. Koreans have a toasted barley tea called bori cha that I like to keep chilled in the fridge during the summer. Sometimes I'll substitute hojicha leaves when I'm out of barley.

 

I'm not 100% sure but I think the type of tea they use during tea ceremonies is matcha. The last time I bought a tin of matcha it was 15 bucks for a teeny tiny tin, it's pricier than loose teas. For the most part, I use it in cooking/baking. I've never actually prepared matcha for myself, but if put in front of me I'd drink it.

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Greens I Like: Bancha, Genmai Cha, Jasmine.

 

Blacks I Like: Lapsang Souchong, Oolong, and any Blackcurrant.

 

For iced black teas I just use a good blackcurrant. For iced herbal, a mixture of lemongrass, peppermint, and chamomile (my chamomile is also a mixture, but it's proprietary :wub: ).

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