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Paris Bistros, Restos


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As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

We are leaving Sunday. Unless someone can get us in to Le Comptoir, we are eating at Le Mesturet Wed. night. The other meals are all in bistros. We decided not to go for 3* food this trip except for one meal in Brittany.

There aren't any three stars in Brittany to my knowledge. :wub:

 

If you are thinking of Roellinger or Jacques Thorel, they are both only **.

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Generally, what's the best way (if there is any) to go about reservations to bistrots?  Do I try a few weeks before?  Later?  Do I call from the hotel the night before?  :wub:

If you have a concierge at your hotel, you should be able to call him/her or use e-mail or fax and tell him what you need. Usually, they can line it up for you. A small gratuity is usually appreciated.

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Generally, what's the best way (if there is any) to go about reservations to bistrots?  Do I try a few weeks before?  Later?  Do I call from the hotel the night before?  :wub:

If you have a concierege at your hotel, you should be able to call him/her or use e-mail or fax and tell him what you need. Usually, they can line it up for you. A small gratuity is usually appreciated.

And a huge gratuity will turn almost any concierge into your body servant and bondsman for the duration of your stay.

 

I used to arrange my walking to take me near a restaurant I wanted on the day before I wanted it. Then I'd drop in and ask for a reservation for the next day. My physical presence and my discussion with the patron of the resto's cuisine were usually powerful arguments in my favor, even when obtaining reservations by more conventional means was a dicey proposition. (That and the fact that I wasn't too insistant on a particular time.)

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We are leaving Sunday.  Unless someone can get us in to Le Comptoir, we are eating at Le Mesturet Wed. night.  The other meals are all in  bistros.  We decided not to go for 3* food this trip except for one meal in Brittany.

There aren't any three stars in Brittany to my knowledge. ;)

 

If you are thinking of Roellinger or Jacques Thorel, they are both only **.

If you've eaten there I'd love your opinion on his use of spices.

 

I understand that he uses them very delicately and it's hard to pinpoint what/how. And I do know that spices can be used in a such a way.

 

But I'm interested in more specific details.

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We are leaving Sunday.   Unless someone can get us in to Le Comptoir, we are eating at Le Mesturet Wed. night.  The other meals are all in  bistros.  We decided not to go for 3* food this trip except for one meal in Brittany.

There aren't any three stars in Brittany to my knowledge. ;)

 

If you are thinking of Roellinger or Jacques Thorel, they are both only **.

If you've eaten there I'd love your opinion on his use of spices.

 

I understand that he uses them very delicately and it's hard to pinpoint what/how. And I do know that spices can be used in a such a way.

Naturally I have dined on Roellinger's cuisine (three meals; single visit). I disliked his cuisine; his use of spicing is not at all subtle. It's arguably abrasive (at least to my tastebuds, which admittedly, prize subtlety more than most). I was not particularly impressed, and doubt I would return. I can see why he has had problems getting his third star, although I don't doubt he may do so one of these days.

 

I'm actually quite interested in views on Jacques Thorel's cuisine at Auberge Bretonne. That's one I'm interested in visiting.

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We are leaving Sunday.  Unless someone can get us in to Le Comptoir, we are eating at Le Mesturet Wed. night.  The other meals are all in  bistros.  We decided not to go for 3* food this trip except for one meal in Brittany.

There aren't any three stars in Brittany to my knowledge. ;)

 

If you are thinking of Roellinger or Jacques Thorel, they are both only **.

If you've eaten there I'd love your opinion on his use of spices.

 

I understand that he uses them very delicately and it's hard to pinpoint what/how. And I do know that spices can be used in a such a way.

Naturally I have dined on Roellinger's cuisine (three meals; single visit). I disliked his cuisine; his use of spicing is not at all subtle. It's arguably abrasive (at least to my tastebuds, which admittedly, prize subtlety more than most). I was not particularly impressed, and doubt I would return. I can see why he has had problems getting his third star, although I don't doubt he may do so one of these days.

 

I'm actually quite interested in views on Jacques Thorel's cuisine at Auberge Bretonne. That's one I'm interested in visiting.

Unnaturally, I have also dined at Roellinger. My pedestrian palate found it to be one of my favorite meals in France. I went into more detail on eG, but I would go even just for the accompanying hotel room and surroundings, which were beautiful.

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Unnaturally, I have also dined at Roellinger. My pedestrian palate found it to be one of my favorite meals in France. I went into more detail on eG, but I would go even just for the accompanying hotel room and surroundings, which were beautiful.

There's something to be said for the gestalt, I find.

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Lunched at Roellinger's last week and enjoyed it. It is a three star experience. His use of

spicing adds elements of surprise to otherwise familiar dishes (lobster/wild duck), yet do not overpower or transform the food to something away from its gustatory roots. I would make a journey to eat there again.

 

On the other hand, lunch at l"Ambrosie was a disappointment. Truffles everywhere but unexciting preparations made the meal, well, just a meal. Eggs florentine with white truffles, scallops with white truffles, bresse chicken with chesnut butter and truffles all were refined, enjoyable but singularly unexciting. My juices would have been stirred more by choucroute than this 700 Euro lunch. 2000 Batard Montrachet (Jadot) was the highlight of the meal. What a wine!

 

Paris bistros sampled were reliable but not to shout about. Oysters, foie gras and champagne at La Coupole is always fun.

 

Single best dishes on the trip were grilled breton lobster with beurre blanc sauce and quenelles in an ecrevisse sauce. The former at Hotel de Point du Grouin in Cancale and the latter at Auberge Bressanes on Ave. La Motte Piquet in Paris.

 

Most imaginative cooking was at Fleur de Sel in Honfleur.

 

Most enjoyable overall meals one night after another were at the Moulin de Vey in Clecy, Normany. We were the only diners in this end of season lovely place, and they served us like royalty.

 

Worst meal was a 5 hour horror waiting for pressed duck at Hotel Dieppe in Rennes. We almost left before the duck quacked.

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