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Paris Bistros, Restos


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What else do you have lined up? Are you doing either Vantre or Table? A L'Ambroisie check in?

 

Yes. Already been to Arnaud Nicholas and a couple of others, will report shortly.

 

Oh, and not really a restaurant (I think there's some simple food earlier in the evening) but an excellent place for a second stop is Benichat - beautiful natural wine list, nice owner, Iago the terrific dog, random meeting with friends of friends from Japan, and some Cornelissen or Partida Creus or such. (note that there aren't many bottles available btg, so prepare your liver). Genuinely open until 2am midweek.

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As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

It's worth noting the obvious, that while there are increasing numbers of great price/quality venues, one can still overpay for an ordinary meal or eat and drink badly at every price point. The old calculus no longer applies.

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Picking up an earlier comment, I think Australia is an exception to the observation about the base cuisine being more vivid to outsiders, which perhaps made it the ideal launch pad for "fusion."

 

Curiously, modern Australian cuisine (local game, indigenous herbs and fruits, etc) post-dated fusion. Before fusion there was seafood or BBQ (grilled rather than smoked) or the cuisines of various immigrant communities.

 

If there was a recognized "Australian" cuisine, it was oddly reconfigured British old school; pies and sponge cakes and puddings.

 

Anyway, France...

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Back in the upright hemisphere - Arnaud Nicolas took over a space that some of you may remember as the very foie centric Au Petit Sud Ouest. There he offers some of the most refined terrines you can hope to find anywhere, along with a wine menu with many surprises and classic French dishes. We went with the recommendation to take four different half-portion terrines - one of duck chicken and foie, a head cheese, jambon persille and grandma's pate, and then a main course of their tourte of foie, pig, and truffles. In hindsight not the best recommendation as you end up with a meat of ground and chopped meat, but still excellent with everything truly expressive of its ingredients and not just pork fat and spices. The wine list has many choices from small producers - we got a bottle from Michaël Georget who works some previously abandoned plots near Perpignan - this is one of those cases where you would never guess that it's a wine from the south, or that it's primarily grenache / syrah, which both makes it excellent and casts the usual doubt about what exactly natural winemaking ends up expressing. Cheeses to finish - very good and again in keeping with the theme - restrained and refined - like the most perfect brie de meaux ever. I think the best use of the place is to get the terrines and foie for a picnic, or maybe for lunch, but anyway, try his terrines. €220, about €100 of it on wine.

 

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TIL what French tacos are. It's funny.

 

Yoshinori - on rue Grégoire de Tours where a while ago you'd think terrible greek restaurants and Fakey O'Brian's pub, two Japanese guys in the kitchen, one waiter, delivering very good modern French food at bargain prices - 70 Euros for a three course menu, plus 10 if you want their beautiful pigeon tourte, plus 30 if you want homard bleu. I didn't love the wine list overall, but found something nice from Chassorney. The small team does mean the meal is very slow, even by French standards, and there are some missteps (how would you like, as the last bite of the meal, a simulation of nuclear fission in your mouth from overly ecstatic popping candy?), but very good.

 

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These are excellent posts. Very interested to hear about Le Clarence - its off the (my) radar in the Paris two star group, so interested both in how it was and how you ended up there.

 

On the prices, I already forget about there 20% gross up on nyc bills. Paris is pretty clearly less expensive.

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There's a terrific little dumpy room called Amarante - the food is very, very simple (I reckon the kitchen is three pans and an oven) but well prepared - fried brains, sweetbreads (well cooked and pressed then seared), tongue, kintoa pork shoulder steak, etc. It's open Sundays and Mondays and they have generous glasses of the JF Chene l'O2 Vigne for 8 and other such things. The chef used to have a place called Christophe a while back that the french blogopress liked but I didn't really get.

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I'm not sure what we're doing here since there was still no reference to the laughable opulence of Le Clarence :)

 

But for what it's worth, the green asparagus at Le Clarence is so much better than anything you will find served on rue Denoyez (and I am saying this without recommending the restaurant) that if anything, it tells the story - many nice places to eat without a fuss but almost none of them remarkable in any way...

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