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Paris Bistros, Restos


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As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

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It's as if the conversation is moving back in time. From a decade lag we're now saying you have to be a coke head to like natural wine? That a label is much needed?

 

Did not write that at all, and on that subject of coke referred only to a vocal handful of its militants. The issue being tasting ability. I have to work with them sometimes. I'm describing the current state of things.

 

The need for a label is still heavily discussed. No one has been able to come up with one yet.

 

It sort of figures that this side of the situation should be at a standstill for years in such conditions. Meanwhile, better natures are being made.

 

(I don't see the point of your post.)

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You're right that there is no point in responding to a generic argument about rock, punk, modern art, or natural wine and how the practitioners of such fields can't sing, dance, paint, or taste, and are druggies for sure.

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"joethefoodie" post: "And how could I forget - a great meal at Chez La Vieille (a real blanquette de veau, rabbit kidneys, tete de veau, great huge oysters, etc. etc.), where we may have been known to the house, as the number of comps sent out meant we could barely put a dent in our plats. I'm pretty sure there was a course containing fraise de veau at a meal somewhere, somehow.”

 

We went to Chez La Vieille last night & had a similarly excellent meal (no comps, although staff and surrounding diners were interested in that we’d been to Le CouCou). I also had the rabbit kidneys and blanquette de veau &, while Ginny’s duck terrine and beef dish were very good, mine were great. The white chocolate mousse w/rhubarb crumble wasnt bad either.

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We spoke to the young Israeli chef - really nice guy.  What was funny was how he compared Frenchie To-Go's pastrami to Katz's and said it was nowhere near as good. And then pointed out that it was similar to how everyone likes the falafels on Rue des Rosiers - but they can't hold a candle to most of what's available - in Israel!

 

That's a bit of hyperbole. Most of what's available in Israel is made from commercial mix (that has many things going on in it except for chickpeas and spices) and fried in burnt oil, but then you don't eat most of what's available, you go to the good places. The stuff on Rue de Rosiers is above average in Israel as a whole, but not major league. I hope Frenchie's doesn't relate to Katz in the same way, but I suspect it might.  :D

 

A good point about comparisons.   What's special is when you inadvertantly fall over one that beats everything in your experience.   

 

Not to mention that L'as du Fallafel and its friends on Rue des Rosiers serve some of the cheapest most available Sunday food and lunch outside of 12-230 in Paris.  There might be some portion of the tourists in line that believe they're getting better falafel than they can get in Israel, but I think most are thinking something more along the lines of "I'm getting a tasty affordable meal and we can have a big group in and out in a fraction of the time it would take to go pretty much anywhere else in Paris." I eat there not infrequently and I'm glad to have it in the neighborhood.  If it were in NY I'd probably eat there too, not withstanding the fact that technically better meals would be widely available to me there as well.

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@Jesikka   "Not to mention that L'as du Fallafel and its friends on Rue des Rosiers serve some of the cheapest most available Sunday food and lunch outside of 12-230 in Paris.  There might be some portion of the tourists in line that believe they're getting better falafel than they can get in Israel, but I think most are thinking something more along the lines of "I'm getting a tasty affordable meal and we can have a big group in and out in a fraction of the time it would take to go pretty much anywhere else in Paris." I eat there not infrequently and I'm glad to have it in the neighborhood.  If it were in NY I'd probably eat there too, not withstanding the fact that technically better meals would be widely available to me there as well."

 

By and large, fallafel is fallafel, hardly an epiphany.    But so far, no one has pointed me toward better table sauce than they serve at L'as.    "Memorable" is an understatement.       

 

 

 

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@Jesikka   "Not to mention that L'as du Fallafel and its friends on Rue des Rosiers serve some of the cheapest most available Sunday food and lunch outside of 12-230 in Paris.  There might be some portion of the tourists in line that believe they're getting better falafel than they can get in Israel, but I think most are thinking something more along the lines of "I'm getting a tasty affordable meal and we can have a big group in and out in a fraction of the time it would take to go pretty much anywhere else in Paris." I eat there not infrequently and I'm glad to have it in the neighborhood.  If it were in NY I'd probably eat there too, not withstanding the fact that technically better meals would be widely available to me there as well."

 

By and large, fallafel is fallafel, hardly an epiphany.    But so far, no one has pointed me toward better table sauce than they serve at L'as.    "Memorable" is an understatement.       

Agree.  That sauce is great.  I ate a lot of it on a piece of grilled chicken (also hardly an epiphany) yesterday and I felt like I'd basically had a 3 day juice cleanse equivalent (I have no idea what a three day juice cleanse is like and don't want to know).  

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You mean the harissa or another sauce?

The sauce they put on the table in a (too) little container that I consume all of and annoy the hostile waiters by smiling and asking for more.    I would classify it as near east salsa; it's not harissa as I know it.

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I never sat down to eat, just assumed it was something along the lines. What they put in the sandwich is more like red zhug in terms of spiciness and spicing iirc. (and would have that, err, cleansing effect)

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