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Paris Bistros, Restos


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This is an endemic problem across all boards, even the most highly moderated ones. It’s illustrative that falafel fights are the only kind of posts that generate real back and forth.

 

So what’s good in Paris? It would be a better fight at least.

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As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

This is an endemic problem across all boards, even the most highly moderated ones. It’s illustrative that falafel fights are the only kind of posts that generate real back and forth.

 

So what’s good in Paris? It would be a better fight at least.

The "fight" is not about falafel, but rather respecting others' opinions.   Maybe just about respect.  

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This is an endemic problem across all boards, even the most highly moderated ones. It’s illustrative that falafel fights are the only kind of posts that generate real back and forth.

 

So what’s good in Paris? It would be a better fight at least.

Fine, I'll play ball.  Here are some restaurants I like that I've never seen any of you talk about: Sur Mer, L'Attache, Dilia, Le Rigmarole.  I had a great meal recently at Passerini with someone else from this board who doesn't post anymore.  Who would like to start by telling me I'm wrong?

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This is an endemic problem across all boards, even the most highly moderated ones. It’s illustrative that falafel fights are the only kind of posts that generate real back and forth.

 

So what’s good in Paris? It would be a better fight at least.

Fine, I'll play ball.  Here are some restaurants I like that I've never seen any of you talk about: Sur Mer, L'Attache, Dilia, Le Rigmarole.  I had a great meal recently at Passerini with someone else from this board who doesn't post anymore.  Who would like to start by telling me I'm wrong?

 

Sur Mer was on our list for last visit but we fell out of time.   I love Dilia.   With your recs, I'd certainly be willing to try L'Attache and La Rigamarole.   We have a very long history with Giovanni at both his original Rino and later at current Passerini.   Superb pastas and mains as well, not always the case today.    Excellent treatment of game birds and meats.    So far, you're batting well

 

I was just musing about touting low brow food.    If I went to NY, I would love to write about a funky sandwich shop accessed by a window where half the time they ran out of food before they ran out of customers, or a even funkier bodega that was turning out really interesting dishes, worthy of a detour.     Would be nice...

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This is an endemic problem across all boards, even the most highly moderated ones. It’s illustrative that falafel fights are the only kind of posts that generate real back and forth.

 

So what’s good in Paris? It would be a better fight at least.

Fine, I'll play ball.  Here are some restaurants I like that I've never seen any of you talk about: Sur Mer, L'Attache, Dilia, Le Rigmarole.  I had a great meal recently at Passerini with someone else from this board who doesn't post anymore.  Who would like to start by telling me I'm wrong?

 

Sur Mer was on our list for last visit but we fell out of time.   I love Dilia.   With your recs, I'd certainly be willing to try L'Attache and La Rigamarole.   We have a very long history with Giovanni at both his original Rino and later at current Passerini.   Superb pastas and mains as well, not always the case today.    Excellent treatment of game birds and meats.    So far, you're batting well

 

I was just musing about touting low brow food.    If I went to NY, I would love to write about a funky sandwich shop accessed by a window where half the time they ran out of food before they ran out of customers, or a even funkier bodega that was turning out really interesting dishes, worthy of a detour.     Would be nice...

 

If you know the chef, she'll even tell you when they're open via text and you can make sure they don't run out - or cater your goodbye party when you change countries!  

 

Sur mer is super casual and just totally delightful.  L'Attache is mostly the most fun bar in town (lots of late night restaurant folk and open much later than other places), but Sofiane turns out some really lovely food with basically no kitchen and it has flown entirely under the radar so its a nice option to know about.  I doubt much of the crowd even knows they serve food.  I have a couple new ones on my list to try so I'll report back, especially Adelaine Grattard's new spot L'aitcha.

 

I am currently interested in any great sushi that could be recommended in Paris.

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If I went to NY, I would love to write about a funky sandwich shop accessed by a window where half the time they ran out of food before they ran out of customers,

If there's one thing there's no dearth of on MFF, it's posts about that.

 

 

I mean, it is utterly appropriate that the crazy French food writer ingredient obsessive guy opens a clubby one-star, the crazy British food blogger ingredient obsessive guy opens an unsustainable and celebrated one star, and the crazy American message board poster ingredient obsessive guy opens a sandwich shop that keeps running out of sandwiches. 

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We were in Paris when the Sur Mer (then Le Verre Vole Sur Mer) was threatening to break Not Drinking Poison's face. I've heard the current iteration is much better (and less violently alcoholic) but haven't tried it yet. 

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We were in Paris when the Sur Mer (then Le Verre Vole Sur Mer) was threatening to break Not Drinking Poison's face. I've heard the current iteration is much better (and less violently alcoholic) but haven't tried it yet.

The former chef now owns the restaurant and she’s done nicely on her own with it. It’s really quite simple food, basically high quality shellfish relatively untouched. The atmosphere is high spirits but I cannot imagine threats or fistfights.

 

Like most of the best of Paris right now, the food is extremely simple and very high ingredient quality. It’s all the kind of thing you think you could pull off yourself at home, but you: 1) can’t actually get the best petit pois in all of France and 2) if you did you couldn’t cook them perfectly and barely at all, even though you think you could. Bruno Verjus recently served me an extremely sultry sliced tomato. While NY reintroduces sauces and the two most popular restaurants serve heavy French food, we’re just sitting around in Paris eating raw oysters, petit pois with lemon and butter, perfectly cooked poultry with a crispy skin and a sauce made from reduced tomatoes with raw tomatoes tossed in salt and olive oil. The French have not forgotten how to make sauces but they don’t do it just to prove they remember. The most popular lunch spot makes great cookies, better than any I’ve had in America (except for the occasional Abraco triumph). It’s like Alice Waters in 2019 if the ingredient quality were 30% better than at Chez Panisse and the technical cooking skills were 2-3x. Perfect for a summer of canicules and it goes well with l’heure bleue, because the magical sky in Paris definitely makes the food taste better.

 

Come at me.

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We were in Paris when the Sur Mer (then Le Verre Vole Sur Mer) was threatening to break Not Drinking Poison's face. I've heard the current iteration is much better (and less violently alcoholic) but haven't tried it yet.

The former chef now owns the restaurant and she’s done nicely on her own with it. It’s really quite simple food, basically high quality shellfish relatively untouched. The atmosphere is high spirits but I cannot imagine threats or fistfights.

 

Like most of the best of Paris right now, the food is extremely simple and very high ingredient quality. It’s all the kind of thing you think you could pull off yourself at home, but you: 1) can’t actually get the best petit pois in all of France and 2) if you did you couldn’t cook them perfectly and barely at all, even though you think you could. Bruno Verjus recently served me an extremely sultry sliced tomato. While NY reintroduces sauces and the two most popular restaurants serve heavy French food, we’re just sitting around in Paris eating raw oysters, petit pois with lemon and butter, perfectly cooked poultry with a crispy skin and a sauce made from reduced tomatoes with raw tomatoes tossed in salt and olive oil. The French have not forgotten how to make sauces but they don’t do it just to prove they remember. The most popular lunch spot makes great cookies, better than any I’ve had in America (except for the occasional Abraco triumph). It’s like Alice Waters in 2019 if the ingredient quality were 30% better than at Chez Panisse and the technical cooking skills were 2-3x. Perfect for a summer of canicules and it goes well with l’heure bleue, because the magical sky in Paris definitely makes the food taste better.

 

Come at me.

 

 

Certainly, I've found that in my recent trips to Paris. The quality of the baseline inputs at places like Table and Sauturn, not to mention the precise, delicate, technique was far beyond what I ever get to see in North America. 

 

That said, I do get the general feeling (perhaps not empirically justified), that there is this sort of "Le Fooding" category of restaurant that is (i) yes, really popular with Parisians but (ii) gets a lot of focus from North American audiences, while there is also a deep category of restaurants cooking a more traditional style of French food, or a Michelin-style of of French food, that exists, and is seemingly doing really well, but doesn't get a lot of coverage in the English language press. 

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